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~4 WEEKLY JOURNAL 
ILLUSTRATION **> COMMENT 




ESTABLISHED ^ 1&76 



Speed Up 

Your 

Business 



How to get more business? 

A larger use of the long distance and toll line 
service of your Bell Telephone will bring it. 

The two essentials, business enterprise and ap- 
preciation of the service possibilities of the Univer- 
sal Bell Telephone System. 

Speed up your business by reaching out for trade 
over the Bell long distance and toll lines. 

Widen your business field; expand your busi- 
ness; let the Telephone help you. 

The Pacific Telephone 
and Telegraph 
Company. 




THE WASP 



LEADING HOTELS AND RESORTS 



Have You Dined In the 

Palace Hotel 
Court? 

Service and Cuisine Perfect 



Fairmont Under Same Management 



Palace Hotel Company 



MOTEL OAKLAND 

30 Minutes from San Francisco 
DIRECT FERRY TO EXPOSITION GROUNDS 

Cuisine and Service Unsurpassed. Rates Reasonable. 

Under Management of Victor Reiter. 



i 



Holiday Greetings: 

A nice basket of wine or fine old liquors makes a present 
that will be appreciated. Prompt, Free delivery. Call us up. 

Kentucky Mercantile Co. 



X Phone Sutter 4031 



488 SUTTER ST. 



King George Hotel 

MASON STREET AT GEARY 
SAN FRANCISCO 

Opposite Columbia Theatre 



In the center of the down-town shop- 
ping and theatre district 

200 rooms, all with private bath 

RATES 

1 person $1.50 per day and up 

2 persons $2.00 per day and up 

A E. McMAHON, - - Manager 




mm?* — . 



Recognized as the most complete and beautiful residence hotel in the 
orld. 500 rooms, every one with attached bath. 

Tlie Rendezvous of tlie discriminating* travelers from every land 
Largest floor space devoted to public use of any hotel in the world. 
EUROPEAN PLAN 

PALACE HOTEL COMPANY 

SAN FRANCISCO. . . . 

Person ."V .t i.\l r.l .'. ."< ..SS00 J;o. - i5.00; 

Persons ; ??, J.;.*. ;.,••.•-,:. . S3.Q.Q:tj> •??.«£ 



x 
i 



FAIRMONT HOTEL 



Hotel St. Francis 




D D 






Turkish Baths 

Twelfth Floor for Men 
Eleventh Floor for Women 






JAMES WOODS, Manager 



JULES RESTAURANT 



DANCING 

Every Thursday and Saturday Evenings 



Dinner with Wine $1.00 

675 MARKET STREET 



Dancing at 7 p. m. 

OPP. CHRONICLE 



Established 1853 

Monthly Contracts $1.50 per Month 

NEW WORKS JUST ERECTED AT 

27 TENTH STREET, S. P. 

Largest and Most Up-to-Date on Pacific 
Coast. Wagons call twice daily. Cleaning 
Dainty Garments Our Specialty. 

F. THOMAS PARISIAN DYEING & CLEANING WORKS 




Wellington Coal 

Best for Family Use 
For Sale by All Dealers 



Western Fuel Co. 



MINERS AND SHIPPERS 



San Francisco's Fashionable Society, Play and Frolic, in The WASP 



NEW YEAR REJOICINGS 

Lei ua rejoice throughout the earn- 
ing year 

There still may come things pleas- 
ing to the car; 

Let ih be glad, a< Fast the days slip 
by, 

There may be tilings still pleasant 
to the eye! 

The bygone year has made our 

pulses thrill 
With sights and sounds, some bad, 

and some worse still; 
The hobble skirt, the harem and 

the slit, 
Puff bosom shirts and coats that 

did not fit; 
.Songs with no merit save a won- 
drous screech. 
Plays with such virtue as to over- 
reach : 
The bold Reception and the garish 

Tea, 
A woman always where a man 

should be, 
And vice versa — children more than 

rude, 
New platform speakers, nervy, crass 

and crude. 
Sore politicians, always to the front, 
The stupid actor with more stupid 

stunt, 
The silly novel of the Social Whirl, 
The toadyish write-up of some 

wealthy girl, 
And myriad other things as bad 

as these 
To steal our comfort and destroy 

our ease. 

Let us be thankful that the com- 
ing days 

May bear us safely through the 
latest craze 

For smutty stories, pictures, verses, 
songs, 

That should be handled with a 
pair of tongs; 

We may be saved from infamous 
attire. 

Suggestive scenes, the heat of pas- 
sion fire, 

Wherein is baked sin, tragedy, dis- 
ease- 
Let us rejoice! There still are things 
that please! 

— LURANA SHELDON in Town 
topics. 

*■ * * fl- 
it Might Be Worse 

Fifteen firms control the butter 
and egg prices of the United States, 
says a headline. Thank goodness 
there aren't 150 of 'em, for then we 
wouldn't eat those things at all. 



3&WASP 



THE ASSOCIATED CHARITIES AND 
ITS WORK 



The Associated Charities has tak- 
en exception to statements pub- 
lished in The Was]) several weeks 
ago concerning organized charity 
in San Francisco. Under arrange- 
ments made between the Editor and 
officials concerning its activities, 
that organization has submitted a 
statement concerning its activities. 
This statement has been gladly ac ; 
cepted by the Editor, who is 
pleased to accord space to it, in to- 
to. It follows: 

"80.5 per cent of all money re- 
ceived by the Associated Charities 
(including that given by the Coun- 
ty for the board of children) is 
spent on actual relief. Three-quar- 
ters of the relief given to families 
takes the form of food, showing 
that urgent necessities are met. 

"10.5 Per cent is spent for social 
service. This means the service of 
the district nurses, who teach 
mothers and foster mothers how to 
keep the baby well, who go to the 
various corners of the city, in re- 
sponse to the sick call, that im- 
mediate care may be provided. It 
means the time of a sympathetic 
and far-seeing worker, who can en- 
courage the girl with a fatherless 
child, and help her to meet the re- 
sponsibility of making good for 
herself and her baby. It means 
the time of workers who are trying 
to hold together the threatened 
homes in the community, or mend 
the broken ones. It means the ser- 
vice that makes available to sick 
poor free hospital care, valued at 
$18,500.00 annually. It means tele- 
phone service, by which employ- 
ment is found for those who seek 
work. Social service means so much 
that is constructive and goes so far 
toward making good citizens that 
we look forward to the day when 
public opinion will ask that a larg- 
er proportion of its money be so 
spent. 

"5.9 Per cent is spent for adminis- 



tration. This means bookkeeping, 
telephone service, stenography and 
clerical work in the keeping of 
records:— all work that must be ac- 
curately done in any well organized 
business. It also involves the ex- 
penses of the Finance Committee in 
collecting the income of the Asso- 
ciated Charities. That this is even 
as large as it is, is the responsibil- 
ity of the community and not of 
the Associated Charities. 

"3.1 Per cent is spent on the up- 
keep of building, taxes, printing, 
telepChone rental, stationery, etc. 

"Not a penny is spent in commis- 
sions for the collection of funds. A 
gift to the San Francisco Associated 
Charities means money spent in 
helping people to help themselves. 
A temporary boost or even a loan, 
in a time of great stress or emer- 
gency, may often helf self-respecting 
people to get upon their feet. In 
reviewing the work for 1913, the As- 
sociated Charities found that ap- 
proximately 50 per cent of the fam- 
ilies aided during the first half of 
the year were self-supporting at its 
close. 

"Boarding children and babies in 
private homes, with their own or 
foster mothers, was first introduced 
and made practical in San Fran- 
cisco by the Associated Charities. 
This is the system now recognized 
and endorsed by the State. In 1914, 
through the Children's Department, 
507 children were cared for in foster 
homes. On this group alone, the 
Associated Charities spent $18,000.00 
over and above that allowed by the 
County. 

"What the Associated Charities is 
doing for children is typical of the 
constructive and far-seeing work 
that is being done by the organi- 
zation. Children cared for in good 
homes, either by their own or fos- 
ter mothers; careful consideration 
for the education and training of 
these children, looking toward their 
future vocation; the reduction of 
the foundling death rate from 50 
to 2.9 per cent; families restored to 
self-support and self-respect; all 
this, and the spirit in which it is 
done, entitles our local Associated 
Charities to the respect and the 
support of the community." 



DEFIANCE 
i Mi! Spirit of the passing day. 
Whose charm is but the flight of 

thought, 
Wouldst wish me peace that ne'er 

could stray. 
To live and last 'til life was sought. 

The daffodil in watery bed 
Can sway and bend its gentle head, 
For it was made to bow to winds 
Which gave no thought, nor har- 
bored sins. 

But I am Life, with fear and love, 
Cast to this earth by One above, 
A child of chance and not of choice, 
Though one who hath both 
thought and voice. 

If tongues of men could strike to 

kill, 
My life would be the wish of will 
To spirit me to some dark place 
And lie and rust for'er in space. 

But thanks to Him who made, and 

Knows, 
I scoff at all their verbal blows. 
I'll conquer yet, for win I must, 
Let gossiping thunder end in dust. 
—EDWIN PARKER ROBBINS. 
# # # # 

Kind Milkman 

When little Bennie brought the 
milk in off the front porch one cold 
morning he found a pillar of frozen 
fluid sticking out of the bottle. 

"Oh, mamma," he cried. "I like 
our new milkman." 

"Is that so? Why?" asked the 
mother. 

Showing her the bottle, Bennie 
exclaimed: "Our old milkman bare- 
ly filled the bottle, but this one 
heaps it up." 

I I 

I Shreve & Company f 

•{• (Established 1852) •{• 

y X 

X One of the Largest Collec- % 

j ..... , 

•{• in the United States is now 



ROOKWOOD POTTERY 



on display on the second <£ 
floor. This collection in- X 
j* chides innumerable shapes £ 
•{• and sizes in Iris, Ombroso, •{• 
X Vellum, Matt and Glaze, fin- X 
X ishes decorated in scenic and *:* 
•|« floral effects. * 



Post Street and Grant Avenue 
San Francisco 



•****»******4*****************************************«**4**************«*»^t 




THE WASP 



Saturday, January 2, 1915 



INS AND OUTS OF 

THE SOCIAL WORLD 



BY GRACE TIBBITS 



Another Divorce 

Society has been very much inter- 
ested in the news of the pending 
divorce case of Dr. and Mrs. John 
R. Hopkins of Atlanta, Georgia. Dr. 
Hopkins is very well known all ov- 
er the country for two reasons, 
the first being that he has amassed 
a large fortune through the manu- 
facture of patent medicine adver- 
tised throughout the south as the 
"anti-kink remedy", or 'the only 
preparation guaranteed to remove 
the tight curl from the Ethiopian 
hair." Of course, no more popular 
preparation was ever put upon the 
market and Dr. Hopkins has sold 
millions of bottles of it. The second 
cause of his fame is nothing more 
nor less than being the father of 
that eccentric youth, Russel Hop- 
kins, who is frequently a visitor to 
our quiet shores. Russel first came 
into prominence some eight years 
ago when he eloped with seventeen 
year old Vera Lawrence Siegrist, 
which started up a large lawsuit 
drawn by her grandmother. Mrs. 
Joseph Lawrence of St. Louis and 
New York. 

Russel, who possesses a fiery crop 
of brick red hair, and his bride 
started housekeeping in a magnifi- 
cent estate at Irvington-on-the-Hud- 
son, where later, when their union 
was blessed by the arrival of a small 
son, he maintained one of the few 
private menageries of wild animals 
in the country for the amusement 
of the little tot. 

Last year Mr. and Mrs. Hopkins 
were here for a week or more and 
when they left on their private car 
for Coronado, invited several of our 
most popular maids to accompany 
them. 

Dr. Hopkins is the defendant in 
the divorce action and Mrs. McKee 
Bennett Hopkins, the plaintiff. 

* * * * 

Last Wish Observed 
Quite in accordance with the 
wishes of poor little Thelma Parker 
Smart, her ashes were taken to 
Hawaii, her native home and tossed 
to the four winds from the top of 
Mount Mauna Kea, which over- 
looked her plantation at Wainiea. 
And so the final chapter of her sad 
little life was ended in the romantic 
way that she had chosen. Mr. and 
Mrs. Fred Knight accompanied the 
ashes to the islands, Mrs. Knight 
remaining there for a visit. Mrs. 
Knight was one of the well-known 
Dowsett girls of Honolulu and it 
was from her first husband, the son 
of Colonel Parker that Thelma in- 
herited ail of her vast fortune. 

* * * -x- 

And Still They Knit 
Of course we are all very much in- 
terested in Red Cross work and 
thoroughly approve of most any- 
thing done in the sweet cause of 
charity, but there are limitations 
so say the gossips. For the last few 



months it has been a most common 
sight to see our society maids and 
matrons knitting at the various 
concerts or even pulling forth 
their bags of yarn during the in- 
termission of a most thrilling play 
But the limit was reached the other 
night, so I hear, at a very brilliant 
ball when a certain very well-known 
matron sat through the entire ev- 
ening knitting a long grey woolen 
neck scarf. No one remarked about 
the lady's industry, and the hostess 
suggested afterwards that dia- 
monds and grey wool seemed just 
a wee bit incongruous when mixed 
up together like that. 

A Hasty Marriage 
Both Army and civilian circles 
were very much surprised last week 
when the hasty nuptials of Miss 
Ruth Londahl and Lieut. William 
Hooper Jouett, U. S. A., were made 
public. Miss Londahl, it seems, was 
the daughter of Chaplain and 
Mrs. M. M. Londahl of the Thirtieth 
Infantry, which has been stationed 
at the Presidio for the past four 
or five months, in fact, ever since 
their return from Alaska. Young 
Jouett, who is a lieutenant of the 
Coast Artillery, fell very much in 
love with Miss Londahl who has 
been a decided belle here ever since 
her arrival at the Presidio. All 
went well apparently until the 
Thirtieth got orders to proceed to 
Plattsburg Barracks, New York, 
via the canal, sailing the day before 
Christmas. Then the young couple 
realized they couldn't stand the 
separation, and so two days before 
the transport sailed, without say- 
ing a word to anyone, off they 
skipped and were married. Lieut. 
Hooper is a San Franciscan by birth 
and he is the grandson of the late 
Colonel William Hooper, who for 
years was the proprietor of the old 
Occidental Hotel, which was always 
army headquarters for service peo- 
ple coming to the city. His mother 
was Frances Hooper who was di- 
vorced from her first husband Jou- 
ett and married Captain Fred L. 
Perry of the Coast Artillery Corps, 
now stationed at Fort Barrancas. 
Florida. He entered the naval Ac- 
caderny with the idea of making 
that branch of the service his career, 
but after several months there, he 
failed, and later entered the army 
by civil appointment. 

The young couple are now at Palo 
Alto where they are the guests of 
Mrs. William Lyons, who was Miss 
Rose Hooper, of this city, an aunt 
of the groom. On their return they 
will make their home at Fort Win- 
field Scott where Lieut. Jouett is 
now stationed. 

Black Becomes 
Pretty Miss Helen Keeney, who is 
missed at all of the affairs of this 
season of which she was enrolled 



as a debutante, is looking exceed- 
ingly pretty these days in her 
clothes of mourning.. She is wear- 
ing all black without any touch of 
white, her hat being covered with 
a black chiffon veil which hangs 
partly down her back. Her sister 
Mary, Mrs. Talbot Walker, who is 
also in deep mourning for her fath- 
er, the late Dr. James Ward Keeney, 
also looks very pretty in black, her 
bright coloring and large brown 
eyes seeming to stand out from 
their somber background. 

I saw pretty Mrs. Willard Drown 
the other day in the most becom- 
ing hat I have seen this winter. It 
was all white being the soft white 
breast of the bird with a white 
wing across the top. The fair Edith 
sems to know the secret of youth 
and looks younger each winter. 

Back From Abroad 
Mrs. Herbert Payne, who has only 
just returned from Europe is wear- 
ing an extremely chic costume of 
black cloth, made with a full pleat- 
ed skirt and the coat was on the 
hew short order. Her hat was a 
jaunty little round affair of goura 

feathers. 

* # # * 

Mrs. Spreckels Entertains 
By far the most elaborate private 
affair of the season was the party 
the Adolph Spreckels gave last 
week, which began in the afternoon 
and lasted until the wee sma' hours 
of the morning. The afternoon af- 
fair was for the children given in 
honor of the little Spreckels tots, 



Alma, Adolph Jr., and Dorothy, and 
of course a truly gala occasion it 
was. Each youngster received 
many gifts and pandemonium fair- 
ly ran riot in the noise and laugh- 
ter. Besides playing all sorts of 
games, the children danced, and 
many of the "grown-ups" who 
looked on, might well have taken 
notes for many of the small girls 
and boys dance quite as well as 
their parents. Small Alma and 
Adolph Spreckels are both natural 
dancers and were quite the cynosure 
of all eyes as they clasped chubby 
arms about one another and start- 
ed off. 

The evening affair began with a 
marvelous dinner served at one 
large round table, resembling fairy- 
land. All of the guests came in 
fancy costumes, and even the wait- 
ers lent color to the scene in bright 
Pierrot costumes. 

Madame Margaret Barry, the clev- 
er artist, who is here for a short 
time from Paris, enacted a panto- 
mime with Edgar Walter to assist 
her in the marvelous Pompeiian 
room of the Spreckels' mansion. 
This is only the second time Mad- 
ame Barry has appeared in public 
since her return to her native 
heath, and she made a much more 
favorable impression upon the au- 
dience than on the former occa- 
sion, when she played in Frank 
Pixley's little skit at the Charity 
performance given at the Orpheum. 
She was in a superb sheath-like 
gown of shimmering beads and 
clinging chiffon, and Mr. Walter, 




Coats 



One hundred of the season's smart- 
est styles. Of every material, color 
and model. Suitable for every oc- 
casion, and all of them very low 
price. Come this week and examine 
our stock. 

Style B ■$ 9.75 
Style A - $19.75 
Style C ■ $14.75 

Gould- Sullivan 

Cloak and Suit Co. 

882 Market Street, Opposite Emporium 
Open Saturday evenings till 10 p. m. 



Saturday. January 2, 1915 



TI1K WASP 



who was the -lu-i k. was stunning 
in silver with tiger skins thrown 
across him. 01 the guests, little 
Mrs. Vincent Whitney «a- perhaps 
tin' most fascinatingly dressed as 
u oew Christmas doll In white and 
sliver with short pink socks and 
little Mary .lane pumps. 

The Jack SpreckelS were both 
there and one hud to remind one- 
Sell Ol their decree all the time, tu 

remember that they wore not still 
the devoted couple, she. in a rag- 
ged little Cinderella costume and 
he. as the model boy, danced to- 
gether frequently. 

* * » # 

An Interesting Dance 

The debutante and sub-debutane 
sel were entertained elaborately 

this week when Mr. and Mrs. Servis 
Hanchett gave an informal dance 
at their home on Washington street 
for their two daughters, the Misses 
Alice and Lucy Hanchett. The two 
Hanchett girls, who will be buds of 
next season, are the neices of the 
late Mrs. George Crocker, who, be- 
fore her marriage, was Mrs. Emma 
Hanchett Rutherford. George 
Crocker was the son of old Charles 
Crocker, the pioneer railroad king, 
who, when he died, placed a large 
sum of money in trust for his son 
George, which he was to inherit if 
he went for five years without 
touching a drop of anything alco- 
holic'. This young Crocker did, and 
at the end of which time he not on- 
ly got his money but the widow 
Hanchett besides. 

Lewis Hanchett, who lived for 
many years in Sacramento, married 
Miss Lucy LTpton, who was the 
daughter of very wealthy and prom- 
inent people there. But soon after 
the birth of her second little 
daughter, she died leaving Han- 
chett a widower with two tiny 
daughters. After several years of 
loneliness, he married again, this 
time making Miss Mary Corbett the 
daughter of Burke Corbett, his 
bride. Mrs. Hanchett, who is quite 
as fond of her two little step-daugh- 
ters as though they were her own, 
is planning many entertainments 
in their honor. 

* * * # 

Rumor Denied 

The rumor that the engagement 
of Miss Ernestine McNear and 
George Nickel has been broken is 
Vicing quite vigorously denied by 
both the McNears and the Nickels. 
Dame Gossip, who has been busy- 
ing herself in the affairs of this 
young couple for sometime, is now 
quite satisfied that all is entirely 
serene in their domestic affairs and 
that the early spring will hear the 
wedding bells ringing for them. 

Makes Her Bow 
The last one of the debutantes to 
make her formal bow to the world 
of fashion was Miss A. Schwer- 
in, who was presented to society at 
a large ball given Monday night at 
the St. Francis by Mr. and Mrs. Ren- 
nie Pierre Sehwerin. Although the 
vivacious Arabella has had a sea- 
son in Washington where she was 



line ol the t feted belles, she is 

quite as unspoiled as the most un- 
sophisticated little budlet. and pos- 
sesses all ill her mother's buoyant 
personality and sparkling wit. 
Quite unlike the usual custom of 
buds. .Miss Arabella carried a great 
armful of American beauty L'OSeS 
which seemed better suited to her 
style than the usual shower bou- 
quet of orchids, generally so popu- 
lar with debutantes. Of course, all 
of society with a capital S was 
there and both the Colonial ball 
room and the Italian room were 
tilled with gorgeously gowned wom- 
en and immaculate men. 

Arabella, who is a fascinating 
maid to look at, with brilliant col- 
oring, blue eyes and brown hair, 
looked like a cutting out of Vogue 
in a truly marvelous gown of white 
net and crystals. It was made on 
the long straight lines, having a 
full skirt and the new long cavalier- 
cape, which was fastened between 
her shoulders and hung nearly to 
the hem of her gown. American 
beauty roses at her waist was quite 
the only touch of color that she 

wore. 

* * * * 

Lieut. Baker Leaves 
It is with genuine regret that so- 
ciety is bidding farewell to Lieu- 
tenant Lester Baker, who is leaving 
on Wednesday for Honolulu. Lieut- 
Baker, who has been a most un- 
tiring host ever since his arrival 
here and who is very popular in 
the dancing set, is aide to Brigadier 
General John P. Wisser, who has 
recently been ordered to assume 
command of the First Hawaiian bri- 
gade, formerly commanded by Gen- 
eral Clarence R. Edwards. General 
Edwards, who arrived from Hawaii 
a few' weeks ago, is now en route 
to the Canal Zone where he is to 
assume charge. Lieut. Baker has 
made a host of friends since his sta- 
tion here, and there will be several 
affairs given for him before he bids 
San Francisco farewell. 

* * * # 

A Happy Pair 

Mr. and Mrs. Eliott Rogers, bride 
and groom of only a few weeks, 
have returned from their honey- 
moon and are now domiciled in 
Mrs. Rogers beautiful home at 
Montecito. Soon after the New 
Year, however, the dashing Mar- 
guerite and her good looking hus- 
band are planning to come up here 
where their friends will do all that 
entertaining they were cheated out 
of doing by the erratic Marguerite's 
sudden nuptials. 

Everyone was anticipating a bril- 
liant wedding, for Marguerite's mil- 
lions could have made some show- 
ing, but instead of that, she decid- 
ed suddenly after returning from a 
lunch party one day, to be married 
at tea time. The devoted Eliott is 
quite the typical bride groom and 
beau, and simply worships the 

ground she walks on. 

* * * * 

Interesting Engagement 
News of a very interesting en- 
gagement which has just reached 

-v = i 



us from Honolulu is that ol Miss 

Helen Spalding to Ensign Howard 
Douglas Bode, r. S. V Miss Spald- 
ing is the youngest daughter of 
Mr. and Mrs. Edward Irwin Spald- 
ing, who own one of the show -places 
in our island possessions. Mr. 
Spalding is a well known banker 
of Honolulu, ami a nephew of the 
late William (i. Irwin, the sugar 
magnate, so Miss Helen Spalding 
and Helene Irwin Crocker are sec- 
ond cousins. All of the daughters 
of the Spalding family have mar- 
ried into the service, Edith, the old- 
est, marrying Lieut. Manuel M. 
Garrett, V. S. A., who was very pop- 
ular in society here some ten years 
ago; Ethel marrying Lieut. Joseph 
A. Rogers, U. S. A., and Alice mar- 
rying Lieut. George C. Bowers, U. S. 
A. Ensign Bode is very well known 
having been here quite often when 
the cruiser California, now re-named 
the "San Diego," on which he is 
stationed was in port. He is the 
(Continued on page 13) 

MRS. SARAH CECILIA CRANE 

Emmanuel Practitioner 
Hours 10 to 4 
1452 Divisadero St., near Geary St. 
Phone Fillmore 3929 



Tu ■ n San i without see- 
ing A. Andrews 1 Dim I Palace would 

be li risiting Europe without seeing 
Paris, it is u leading feature of San 
i '] qi co, a man el of beauty and ele- 

_ and is unquestionably the most 

magnificent jewelry Btore in the world. 
Visitors unit residents are cordially in- 
vited to examine the marvels of genius 
at 50 Kearny Street. Established 1850. 
Open 8 a. m. to 5:30 p. m. 



Phone Kearny 2578 




FOR EXCLUSIVE CUSTOM MADE 
SUITS AND COWNS 



165 POST STREET SAN FRANCISCO 



W \ \ \ \ \ \;\ \ \ \ \/ 

;4 Phone Franklin S062 ' 

' / 



/ 
/ 
/ 
/ 



MRS. F. W. WOOD 

Formerly F. Gerard of New York 

Soivns and blouses 

For Sale and Made to Order 
476 OFARRELL STREET 

SAN FRANCISCO 



; 



ft, •■• -•' 




o-^ 



SCHOOLS 




I PARENTS.ATTENTION! 1 

I t 

(V IN selecting a Business College (j* 

is I to which to send your boys 5* 

-Jf * or girls, you should remem- (5 

*jy ber that practically all the expert o 

A short-hand reporters of tho State ?• 

*® advise you that Gallagher-Marsh ff 

A Short-Hand System is the best, S* 

*£ and you should therefore send & 

g, them to <S 

I Gallagher- Marsh I 

1 Business College I 

§ 1256 MARKET STREET £ 

f? which specializes on Short-Hand, & 

J& Typing and Eook-Keeping. Day *S 

^ and Evening Classes. £i 



nLnUUti college 



RUSSIAN IMPERIAL 
SCHOOL OF DANCING 

VERONINE VESTOFF 

(Late associate of Pavlowa) 
The Imperial Russian 
Ballet School Maintained 
by the Czar of Russia for 
training children to dance, 
is famous throughout the 
world for having brought 
the art of dancing to a 
point of perfection not ap- 
proached in any other 
country. 

Veronine Vestoff is the 
only accredited representa- 
tive of this school in the 
United States. 
Chateau Bohlig — Pine and 
Powell Sts., San Francisco, Cal. 



1215 Van Ness Avenue 
SAN FRANCISCO 



16th & San Pablo Ave. 
OAKLAND 



THE EIBLAW STUDIOS 
OF MODEBH DANCES 
Miss Claribel Kirby announces Mr. 
Gilbert Littlejohn has joined the teach- 
ing forces of this instituion. Private 
lessons or class instruction by appoint- 
ment only. Tea and refreshments if 
desired. 

435 Powell Street, 

Third Floor 

Telephone Sutter 2105 

Instructions given with improved 

methods — Fox Trot, Lulu Fado, One 

Step, Hesitation, Tango, Maxixe and all 

the new dances. 



PUCKETT'S 
College of Dancing 

ASSEMBLY HALL, 1268 SUTTEE 
CLASSES: 

Beginners' Classes Mondays 

Classes and Socials .... Wednesdays 

TANGO CLASSES Thursdays 

Assemblies Fridays 

FOE PRIVATE LESSONS 
PHONE FRANKLIN 118 



A. MAHR B. MIECZKOWSKI 

Graduates of ihe Imperial School 

Russian Dancing School 

Imperial Method Taught 

1509 Gough Street, S. F. 

Telephone West 4935 



THE WASP 



Saturday, January 2, 1915 



cZ&WASP 

The Pacific Coast Weekly 



Published weekly by 

THE WASP PUBLISHING COMPANY (Inc.) 



49 GEARY ST., SAN FRANCISCO, 
Phone, Doug-las 1871 

MARTIAL DAVOUST - - - 

GLENN H. JOHNSON 



Managing" Edi tor 
Associate Editor 



SUBSCRIPTION — In the United States, Canada, and Mexico, $5 a year in advance. 
Entered at the San Francisco Post-office as second-class matter. 



The "Wasp will gladly publish notices of social events and other 
items of interest to its readers. Manuscripts should be at this office 
not later than "Wednesday morning- of the week's issue. 



HAIL! NINETEEN FIFTEEN! 

YEAR OF GREAT promise to San Francisco and California, we 
greet you with, delight. We christen you at your birth in California 's 
wine, bathe you in her sunshine, and trust that when you shall have 
departed, your memory will live longer and more brightly among 
us than any year since the eity was a supply camp. 



NINETEEN FOURTEEN went out with the map of Europe a mat- 
ter of conjecture. Germany showed upon the charts with the quali- 
fying "At the end of July." Belgium was there with some of its 
names Teutonized. France was there with some of the border depart- 
ments sub-eaptioned "Battlefields." Will we have to learn our geog- 
raphy all over again when this year is over? 



WHAT GIFT will the Prohibitionists bestow upon the Hon. Rich- 
mond Pearson Hobson in exchange for his noble work in their behalf? 
Is he to be rewarded for the abuse he has received — and earned — by 
submitting that national Prohibition amendment in the House? If 
the national committee has not yet decided, we would suggest that 
he be named as Prohibition candidate for the presidency. That might 
make him properly dead and so please a tremendous number of people. 



THE LAW-BUTCHERS in a few days will be starting on their bi- 
ennial labors. What crop of fanciful freaks will be brought forth ? 
Are we to have the width of our trousers regulated, or are we to have 
a cafe-curfew set? We suggest a statute settling the space that may 
be uncovered between a lady's shoetops and her skirt; another under 
which licenses must be taken out before writing poetry ; and another 
which shall prohibit pen-pushers from talking about "stories I have 
had rejected." These suggestions are for assemblymen who would 
oeeome senators next season. The advertising they would get out 
of the submission of such proposed measures would be fine founda- 
tion for press-agent work. 



RESOLUTIONS are now commencing to undergo the acid test. A 
few hundred of us are passing cigar stores with averted eyes. A few 
hundred more of us plead other engagements when our friends speak 
of "having one." Som of our wives are wondering how we arrive 
from the office so early and are amazed at the zeal with which we 
attack our respective dinners. It is a part of the opening of each year 
that a large portion of the population shall be a bit more virtuous 
than they were the final days of the year preceeding. It is a part of 
the virtue of youth. With the oozing sap of spring, we — most of us, 
that is — will long for a bit of relaxation from the repression. Then 
we begin to assume our normal bearings and things run along blithely 
until next season for resolutions and page-turning. 



MAYOR ROLPH, we trust, did not spoil his holiday pleasures by 
all the bad feeling and excitement aroused through the firing of the 
fire commissioners. Beastly bad form to have such official family rows 
just in holiday times. 




The Passing of a Loved Churchman 

San Francisco has lost one of its 
great men in the passing of His 
Grace, the Most Reverend Patrick 
William Riordan. Even to those 
who were not of his large flock in 
San Francisco and elsewhere in the 
state — for his spiritual principality 
included all California— the Arch- 
bishop was an imposing figure, and 
a revered one. 

It is a singular thing how closely 
an exalted priest of the Church 
enwraps himself in the spiritual 
life of a community, and how great 
an impression his death makes up- 
on the minds of the people. The 
average right-minded man and wo- 
man has a huge respect, it is almost 
awe, for a man who grows old and 
grey and crowned with honor in 
such service as the priesthood 
means. There is a bigness of soul 
and breadth of outlook about the 
man who reaches an arch-episcopate 
that necessarily means he is a man 
of natural leadership. When such a 
man chooses another field of activ- 
ity, it is certain he will achieve 
great position. Add to such a 
one's ability that religious zeal 
which makes him choose life in the 
Church, with all the repression and 
self-sacrifice such a choice entails, 
and one finds quality of soul that 
makes for true greatness. 

Such a great leader was Archbish- 
op Riordan. He was a natural ex- 
ecutive, and a man of great dignity, 
earnestness and spirituality. He 
was the man of God first, an hum- 
ble servant of the Church, and then 
a great developer, albeit his devel- 
opment was spiritual and not ma- 
terial. He was the father of his 
flock, and touching are the stories 
of the great labors he performed 
quite aside from directing the af- 
fairs of the wide territory he con- 
trolled within the confines of his 
arch-diocese. The little troubles 
he sought to ameliorate for the 
humblest of his charges have earn- 
ed for him, in individual hearts, a 
love and veneration that must have 
meant much to him in his later 
years. 

As Archbishop of San Francisco, 
His Grace controlled the affairs of 
over 200 churches with their 450 
priests; 75 schools, colleges and 
academies enrolling 20,000 students; 
and 25 institutions of charity, in- 
cluding orphanages, hospitals, 
homes for aged and poor. Truly 
it was a vast charge. The mere work 
of assisting in the direction of all 
these was a task for no man of or- 
dinary ability. 

The development of these institu- 
tions, the devising of schemes for 
their improvement, keeping in mind 
always that they were but the out- 
ward signs of the inner life and 
meaning of the Church, was a life- 
work worthy of no mediocre man. 
The strength of these institutions 
under the wing of the Church and 
the vast work they have done, and 
are doing, are a monument to the 
zeal and ability of the late Church- 
man. 



== ' There will be many who will pay 



their tribute of praise and honor to 
the departed prelate. Charles Phil- 
lips of The Monitor, who has been 
associated with him for many years, 
concludes a summary of his life 
with these words: 

"The Catholic people of this arch- 
diocese have lost a friend and a 
father in the death of Archbishop 
Riordan. Those who knew him per- 
sonally have suffered an intimate 
bereavement. And the citizens of 
San Francisco— non-Catholic as well 
as Catholic — who can never forget 
his zeal for, and loyalty to, our city 
when she was stricken unto death 
in the great catastrophe of 1906, 
when the strength of his right hand 
was as a pillar to her in her hour of 
need— the citizens of San Francisco 
one and all pay him today a trib- 
ute of reverence and praise." 



The Vote on Prohibition 

With three hundred eighty-six 
"representatives" voting, 197 voted 
the other day in favor of national 
Prohibition. Only 189 maintained 
their poise and voted against it. 
Adequately to express the feelings 
of what we might call the garden 
variety of men, would necesssitate 
the use of more exclamation points 
than the printer has in his case. 
Startling is no word for it. It makes 
us wonder if the nation has not 
lost its sanity completely! 

Actually, in the United States 
House of Rrepresentatives, more 
members listened to the whirring 
of the Prohibitionist lash than 
stood with poise and balance in 
defiance of fanaticism! Like the 
peace that follows faith, it passes 
understanding. 

Surely the oratory of the much- 
kissed Hobson did not sway them? 
And, also assurely, not all of them 
were honest in their votes? Grant- 
ing that possibly there are some 
fifty real Prohibitionists in the ag- 
gregation who have slipped by the 
voters of their districts on other 
issues, how can one account for 
the remaining 147 who lent their 
strength to such a preposterous 
proposition as national abstinence? 
The answer, we believe, is to be 
found in the bullying tactics of 
the Prohis. 

These Prohibitionists, working os- 
tensibly in a "moral" cause,, — the 
"moral" in a large number of cases 
being their individual pocket-books 
— were guilty of the use of all sorts 
of big sticks. Cases came to the 
attention of the antis during the 
recent campaign in California, 
where merchants in small towns 
were threatened with boycott if 
they stuck cards in their windows 
for anti- Prohibition meetings; 
bankers did not dare take active 
part in the anti campaign for fear 
of losing their depositors; indivi- 
duals were told they would have 
to answer on the Judgment Day for 
a vote cast against Prohibition on 
election day. One of the most dif- 
ficult tasks the advance men for 
"wet" speakers had to perform was 
to get chairmen for the meetings. 

In the case of a Congressman, the 



Saturday, January 2, 1915 



THE WASP 



mutter is much plainer. "Either 
you vote for Prohibition, or we'll 
make an issue of your vote and 
wage a campaign against you at 
tin- next election," they teM the pooi 
representative. What a brutal 
thing to put a poor, job-desirlous 
Congressman up against! Under 
Its persuasive influence, he votes as 
they direct. 

There is an all-too-powerful "dry" 
Bentlment throughout the country. 
Of that there is no Question. One 
must hand it to Richmond Pear- 
son llobson for seeing it in advance 
and getting on the "dry" band- 
wagon. He proved himself a really 
(hiring Opportunist. True, he lost 
out for the Senatorship, but he 
has lined his pockets well with fees 
and traveling expenses in his nu- 
merous "educational" tours here 
and there in the interest of the dry 
fanatics. His recent flying visit into 
our midst doubtloss netted him 
numerous shekels, j Fortunately, 
Californians are too intelligent to 
be influenced by his flap-doodle, 
sloppy sob-stuff, and mutilated 
statistics. 

It is this Hobson who is the little 
tin-god of the Prohis; it is he who 
has graduated from a ship-sinking 
fame into a fame of "Prohibition 
courageousness." The pity of it is 
that otherwise intelligent men have 
followed his lead and have voted 
for his proposed amendment. His 
measure is an absurdity, an inter- 
national joke; moreover, it is an in- 
sult to all Americans, for it is pre- 
mised upon a belief that we are all 
innately weak and lacking in self- 
control. 

While we know there is no hope 
for the measure getting through the 
present Congress, or through any 
Congresses for the next few years, 
still it is well to have in mind that 
the fanatics never quit until they 
die — and then there are "converts" 
to take their places. The thing for 
Californians to remember is that 
three of our Representatives gave 
their votes to it— Raker, Bell and 
Stephens. 



INTERNATIONAL RESOLUTIONS 

The warriors in Europe doubtless 
have had little time to draw up 
New Year resolutions. We submit 
a few: 

The Tsar: To maintain the cap- 
ital at Petrograd if it takes his last 
moujik. 

Kink George: To enlist that mil- 
lion-men army of Kitchener's if he 
must close up his palaces and send 
the servants. 

King Albert: To put a guard 
around his new title of King of 
Jerusalem. 

Kaiser Wilhelm: To find a chief- 
of-staff who will neither become ill 
nor arouse the enmity of the news- 
papers. 

Sir Edward Grey: To find a job 
for Burns and Morley, late of the 
cabinet, somewhere in interior 
Africa. Also, to make G. B. S. chief 
despatch-copyist, the better to pre- 
vent him from laughing periodical- 
ly at bellicose Britain. 




The Auditorium which will be formally opened at a Grand Ball Masque on January 9th 



THE AUDITORIUM BALL 

Now that the holiday doings are 
off the boards, society is looking 
forward with eager interest to the 
grand fancy dress bal masque with 
which the new auditorium in the 
Civic center is to be officially open- 
ed on Saturday evening, January 
9th. It promises to be a most inter- 
esting event in San Francisco's so- 
cial history. 

Numerous pledges of influential 
support have been received by 



Thornwall Mullally, chairman of 
the arrangements committee. 
Among the organizations which 
have enthusiastically tendered their 
assistance arc the Portola Commit- 
tee, the Chamber of Commerce, the 
Downtown Association and the Civ- 
ic League of Improvement Clubs. 
Every foreign and state society in 
the city will participate to a more 
or less extent. 

Special railroad rates have been 
arranged for from all the larger 
towns in the state. Some of these 
are expected to send delegations in 
special trains. It is expected there 



English, French, German and 
other novelists, poets, dramatists 
and scientists: To "stick to their 
knitting" and write novels, poetry, 
plays and scientific brochures and 
to abstain from discussions of the 
war and its causes. 



The New Year Celebration 

at the Palace and Fairmont 

The New Year celebration at the 
Fairmont and Palace will be gay 
events. Table reservations are pour- 
ing in daily to the offices of both 
hostelries and record crowds are 
awaited. 

The decision of Manager Charles 
A. Cooke to celebrate with a dan- 
sant in the ballroom of the Fair- 
mont is meeting with approval 
among the dancing members of all 
the different sets. Naturally the 
Friday afternoon dansant was omit- 
ted for Christmas as that is the 
great stay-at-home day, but New 
Years being also a holiday and one 
on which most people go about, 
the indications are that this will 
be one of the most largely attend- 
ed. Mile. Le Gai and Quentin Todd, 
under whose instructions these 
Fairmont dansants are given, will 
present a number of new dances 
especially suited to the event. The 
dansant will be held from four un- 
til seven. 

For the Palace, Manager Cooke is 
preparing a number of particularly 
attractive novelties that will go far 
toward making the Palace anost 
popular on that night of nights. 
By throwing open the connecting 



doors between the grill and the 
Court and Main restaurant, the 
Palace Hotel presents the greatest 
seating capacity of any hotel in the 
United States. There will be a half 
dozen bands besides a great many 
surprises which Cooke has prepar- 
ed for those who celebrate the year's 
advant. 

* * * # 

A CIVIL WAR HISTORY 

For many years the need of an 
adequate history of the Civil War 
has been felt throughout the 
United States. "A History of the 
Civil War in the United tSates," 
by Vernon Blythe, M. D., is such a 
work. After many years of careful 
research and after examining many 
records, both official and private, 
Dr. Blythe has written a non-parti- 
san history. Although a Southe- 
erner, and the son of a Confederate 
soldier, the author of this volume 
acquired his education in the 
North and has lived many years in 
the North and West. It is believed 
that his work f,vill be generally 
used as a text book throughout this 
country. Illustrated with maps and 
portraits. Neale Publishing Com- 
pany. $2.15 by mail. 

SOME POEMS 

Along the highway of poetry many 
soaring souls have traveled. Few 
have done more, or better work, 
along its oft-times sorry mileage 
than Edmund G. Shannon, whose 
"Along the Highway" has come to 
our table. Although a young man, 
Shannon has accomplished much 
and is easily within the first group 



will be an attendance of at least 
25.0H0 persons. 

A scale of prices has been adopt- 
ed which enables every patriotic 
San Franciscan to attend. Boxes, 
each containing scats for eight, aie 
selling at $50 each at Sherman and 
Clay's, where reserved seats at $2.50 
and $1.50, as well as admission tick- 
ets at $1, may also be had. A num- 
ber of special events are being ar- 
ranged, among these national 
dance by folk from the Scandina- 
vian countries and Oriental feat- 
ures by members of the Japanese 
and Chinese colonies. 



of Southern poets who are so nobly 
upholding the traditions of a dis- 
tinguished lines. But few Ameri- 
cans have done so well within so 
brief a space. Neale Publishing 
Company, $1.50 by mail. 
* * # * 

A DISSENTER 

Elmer Willis Serl has contributed 
two books recently which are of 
more than passing interest. They 
are "Whillikins," a book of con- 
structive dissent, and "The Frater- 
nity of the Fields." The first is a 
smash at our alleged "modern 
brainlessness." The latter is a book 
of the out-doors, a volume of open 
roads, broad fields, and unbridged 
rivers. Neale Publishing Company. 
Each $1.00 by mail. 



THE WAR IS SETTLED 

The troubles of the peace-makers 
are over. The other day, in the 
House, a plan was received from 
the Christian Endeavor Society of 
Omak, Washington (wherever that 
is), favoring the settlement of the 
war by arbitration. The Foreign 
Relations Committee is considering 
it. 



PATRONIZE 




Store 1, Cor. Sutter and Devisadero StreetB 
Store 2, Cor. Haight St. and Masonic Ave. 
Store 3, Cor Sacramento St. and Presidio 

Ave. 
Store 4, 84 Post Street, east of Kearny 
Store 5, Cor. Carl and Cole Streets 
Store 6, Cor. Union and Steiner Streets 
Store 7, Cor. Powell and Sutter Streets 



THE WASP 



Saturday, January 2, 1915 




ANOTHER OPINION ON BIERCE 

The place of Ambrose Bierce upon 
the ladder of literary fame has not 
been settled by the critics. There 
has been no little "wet-blanket" 
stuff written about him here and 
there, against a great deal more 
that was wholly praiseful. It has 
remained for the Portland Specta- 
tor to be entirely unreserved in 
stringing its laurel leaves for his 
brow. Not a wreath but a triple- 
crown they place upon his head: 

"Ambrose Bierce was the bright- 
est literary light that American let- 
ters have had in the past two de- 
cades. His genius shone with such 
effulgence that the mass did not 
understand him; the wild asses of 
journalism tried in vain to imitate 
him, and hated him fiercely and si- 
lently because of their failure; they 
revenged themselves then by steal- 
ing his ideas and expressions, and 
printing them where he never saw 
them, as they are revenging them- 
selves now with the hee-hawing that 
he does not hear. He was a satirist, 
and heartily abhored the shams he 
exposed. A critic, who could do the 
things he criticized better than 
those who essayed them. A poet, 
whose brilliant thoughts and lines 
have been stolen to win reputations 
for the hardy rogues who filched 
them. A gallant soldier, who at 
the age of twenty won fame and 
rank in the Union army, and 
spurned a pension, and never ceas- 
ed to pay the tribute that appar- 
ently only tried valor can give to 
the brave men who supported the 
Lost Cause. A hart-hitting, fair- 
fighting, foe; and a constant, loyal, 
loving friend." 

Dick Chapman Back 

There is a tremendous pleasure 
in giving out supremely good news. 
It has been experienced by a great 
many men and women about San 
Francisco during the past week in 
telling others, whom they felt sure 
would be glad to know— that R. H. 
Hay-Chapman, the brilliant writer 
and editor who once was connect- 
ed with the Post here, and with 
the Herald and the Graphic in Los 
Angeles, is once more happily plac- 
ed by the side of his brave wife and 
children. 

Chapman went down under the 
terrific train of the "graft trials' 
and for the past three years had 
been in one hospital after another 
to regain his normal mental equil- 
ibrium. It had snapped off sud- 
denly and now, it seems, it snapped 
back quite as suddenly. He is a 



bit weakened and fagged by his 
experience, but a rest among his 
normal associations, here in San 
Francisco is all that is needed to re- 
store him. 

It is fine to know that his cour- 
ageous helpmate has seen the re- 
ward of her long-continued faith 
that "Dick" would regain his ment- 
al poise. There was something no- 
ble and inspiring in the way that 
marvellous -woman gathered her lit- 
tle family about her, after her hus- 
band had gone, and exerted her 
bright mind to keep her home at- 
mosphere cheerful and happy des- 
pite the black stroke of bad for- 
tune that had entered it. 

It is to be hoped that with his 
recovery complete, Chapman will re- 
main in San Francisco to become 
once more a big and important 
figure in its literary life. 

Welcomed the New New Year 
The last week in the year saw the 
same steady patronage at the Grand 
Buffet on New Montgomery street, 
opposite the Palace Hotel, that has 
characterized this place ever since 
it was opened. Particularly with 
the guests of the above-named hotel 
is Frank J. Corr's place popular. 
The former are accustomed to the 
best of everything and they find 
in the Grand Buffet just what they 
desire. The New Year was celebrat- 
ed in the proper manner on Friday. 



Holiday Rush at Ruffieux 
It was a busy week at the popular 
candy store of L. Ruffieux on Pow- 
ell street near O'Farrell. There was 
no cessation of the holiday crowds 
that patronized the shop. The 
luncheon served at Ruffieux at- 
tracts many shoppers and matinee 
girls who go there after the show 
for a bit of light refreshments. 

The display during the Christ- 
mas week was noticed by hundreds 
of passers-by. The establishment of 
the L. Ruffieux Company has be- 
come one of the most popular and 
best patronized in San Francisco. 



ENGLISH AS SHE IS SPOKE 

Candid natives of the United 
States will see cause for inward 
pleasure in the action just taken 
by the National Council of Teach- 
ers of English. A committee has 
been appointed to report next year 
on ways and means of improving 
the enunciation, pronunciation and 
artful use of the vernacular. It was 
high time, for, as the most careful 
student of comparative literature 
by foreigners appraising the United 
States, John Graham Brooks, points 
out in his useful compendium, "As 
Others See Us," the consensus of 
poinion is that "among civilized 
folk, we have the least agreeable 
speaking voice." Nor is the testi- 
mony greatly different from that 
of natives of the United States who 
have expatriated themselves for 
years and returned home after con- 
tact with residents of other lands. 
Classic among indictments from 
this group is that talk, "A Ques- 
tion of Our Speech," which Henry 
James gave to the faculty and stu- 
dents of Bryn Mawr College in 1905, 
in which he contended that "of the 
degree in which a society is civilized 
the vocal form, the vocal tone, the 
personal, social accent and sound 
of its intercourse have always been 
held to give a direct reflection"; 
and then he proceeded to rate his 
countrymen and countrywomen as 
least civilized of all men because 
without even the ideal of a tone 
standard, not to mention its 
achievement. 

This may have seemed a hard 
saying to the privileged maidens 
who first heard it, coming from 
homes such as they had been rear- 
ed in. And many an adult reader 
of the speech, who has had the bene- 
fit of cultural advantages and long 
residence in the older cities and 
towns of the country, may protest 
the impeachment. But it is to es- 
sential agreement with Mr. James 
in his plea for something like a 
standardizing of spoken 'English 
that teachers of English, assembled 
in Chicago /and drawn from fill 
parts of the United States, recently 
came. Too often our speech lacks 
precision and is "an inexpert daub 
of unapplied tone." Slurred in- 
stead of clean-cut consonantal emis- 
sions produce ''mere helpless slob- 
ber of disconnected vowel noises." 
"Yes" becomes "Yeh-eh," "Cuba" is 
changed to "Cuba-r," and "Papa" 
falls to an even level in "Popper." 
So with "vurry" (for "very"), "Amur- 
rica," "Philadulphia" and many 
other words that might be cited as 



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standing for "limpness and slack- 
ness and cheapness." 

Critics like Mr. James in their 
point of view as to national needs 
must be as generous as he in ac- 
counting for the facts. "No lan- 
guage," as he says, "has known any 
such ordeal, any such stress and 
strain, as was to await the English 
in this huge new community." It 
has had no ruling caste to con- 
serve defined standards, either for 
literature or speech; and it has 
none now, unless the newly created 
National Academy of Arts and Let- 
ters shall come in time to do what 
the French Academy has done for 
France. Only recently have educa- 
tional institutions conceived it to 
be any part of their duty to do for 
the spoken word what they early 
saw was their function with respect 
to the written vernacular. 

The the national "voice" has in 
it potentialities, when trained, for 
song in its most difficult combina- 
tion with the histrionic art, the 
record of modern opera rendering 
shows. That it can do wonders in 
formal oratory is proved by the roll 
from Patrick Henry to Wendell 
Phillips. It is in the intercourse 
of home, club, street and toil that 
the tones grate on finely attuned 
ears, that consonants are lost and 
vowels are smeared. — Christian Sci- 
ence Monitor. 

«5> Telephone Douglas 5712 & 

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Saturday, January 2, 191c 



THE WASP 



9 




"Life's A Gamble After All" 

Fate conquered over human sym- 
pathy in a pathetic little drama 
that passed unnoticed except by a 
few at the Christmas festivities 
which took place at the County 
Jail. The actors. Mayor Rolph and 
John Tcmpleton, a wayward youth, 
parted with tear-dimmed eyes and 
in their hearts was a pang that 
emphasized the strong parts played 
by Chance and Fate in human ex- 
istence. 

The Mayor was the guest of hon- 
or at the Yuletide celebration. He 
came not only to witness the exer- 
cises planned for the occasion but 
to exercise a time-honored preroga- 
tive of paroling one prisoner as a 
holiday privilege. The names of 
twelve men eligible to parole had 
been selected in advance by the 
prison authorities and written on 
as many cards. It was for the May- 
or to draw one card from the dozen. 

During the exercises the twelve 
men whose liberty on Christmas 
Day depended upon chance alone, 
sat nervously and impatiently. Vis- 
ions of freedom passed through 
their minds. It seemed as though 
the long-awaited moment never 
would come. Suspense was in the 
air. 

When finally the time for the 
"drawing" came, a stalwart young 
man, Templeton, approached. He 
advanced toward the Mayor with 
sprightly step and hope beamed 
from his face. 

"Your Honor," he said to Mayor 
Rolph, "I would be so happy if you 
chose me. I have been so sorry for 
what I have done. All that I want 
is a chance to make good." 

His tone of sincerity impressed 
the Mayor but naught could be 
done but to draw one card blindly 
from the twelve. "Suppose you 
draw a card," suggested Rolph, ex- 
tending his hand in which the doz- 
en cards were held. 

The young man drew a deep 
breath, braced himself, and drew 
one card from the Mayor's hand. 

Nervously he looked at it and 
read the name. Then his head 
drooped, a look of dejection came 
over his face, and tears glistened in 
his eyes. 

"Well, life's a gamble after all," 
he told the Mayor as he walked 
sadly away. 

His Motor Bathhouse 

At least one man in San Fran- 



cisco, who as not a member of the 
Fire Department, knows the 
strength ol the high pressure water 
system. He is W. R. Davenport, 
well known local artist and club- 
man, and he is willing to make affi- 
davit as to the force of the high 
pressure system. For Davenport 
has enjoyed the novel sensation of 
taking a bath in a taxicab when 
the aqua pura was supplied by a 
high pressure hydrant. 

A few nights ago Davenport was 
returning to his apartments from 
the theatre in a taxicab when a big 
limousine ran into his machine in 
Van Ness Avenue near Sutter Street. 
The taxi was sent crashing against 
the curb, and incidentally against 
a water hydrant. 

So great was the force of the im- 
pact that a great hole was ripped in 
the floor of the taxi and as for the 
hydrant— all that was left of it was 
a geyser. 

But fate was not to be lenient 
with Davenport. It brought his 
machine directly over the place 
where the hydrant had been and 
up into the taxi burst a stream of 
water that would have done jus- 
tice to a good-sized fountain. 

The force of the collision had put 
the taxi door out of plumb and 
before Davenport could free himself 
from his motor prison, he had been 
treated to a bath, shower, plunge, 
and all. 

It was a dripping artist who 
walked the rest of the way homo 
but Davenport reached his abode 
wiser than he had left. He had 
learned that the strength of the 
high pressure system is not exag- 
gerated. 



The Redlights Still Burn 

Though the Bedlight Abatement 
Law now is in effect, not a red- 
light in town has been dimmed. Ap- 
parently owners of property where 
the cardinal lamps gleam by night 
arc Hilling to wait for the enforce- 
ment of the law and the situation, 
from one viewpoint at least, is caus- 
ing much comment. 

Naturally financial interests only 
are involved in the fight against 
the statute and the situation that 
has developed is being watched 
with more than passing interest. 

When the law aiming to extin- 
guish the redlights became effect- 
ive, the authorities announced that 
its enforcement would be deferred 
for sixty days pending a test of the 
constitutionality of the law. And 
in the interim not a property owner 
who would be affected by the en- 
forcement of the law, has taken a 
single step to change the nature of 
his property. 

Yet if the legality of the law is 
upheld and the statute enforced, 
every owner of property in the "Ten- 
derloin" will find his building 
closed for an entire year. 

The singularly interesting phase 
of the situation which now is the 
subject of wide comment about 
town is that the income from the 
redlight property during the sixty 
days consumed by the testing of 
the law exceeds the meagre rents 
that would be obtained from the 
leasing of the same property to le- 
gitimate purposes. 

So the property owners are wil- 
ling to take a chance. It is a gam- 
ble. If the law is enforced after 
two months, their places will be 
closed for a year. But if, on the 
other hand, they put out the red- 




We carry a full line of Japanese 

Silks, Kimonos, Mandarin 

Coats, Linen Goods, etc. 

MAIN STORE 

157 GEARY STREET 

Bet. Stockton and Grant Ave. 
Phone DousU 4628 

SAN FRANCISCO, CALIFORNIA 



111 E. COLORADO ST. 
Pasadena, Cal. 

Factory Office: Yokohama, Japan. 



lights now and lease their ram- 
shackle structures to legitimate 
purposes, the income will be triv- 
ial. In fact, two months' income 
with the redlights burning is more 
than a year's revenue otherwise, and 
so they are willing to play the 
game 

* * * # 

The Mayor's Xmas Tree 

Ever since Mayor Rolph has held 
the reins of the city's government, 
it has been his yearly custom to 
bring Yuletide spirit into his office 
in the way of a tall Christmas tree, 
loaded down with present for his 
office staff and members of the of- 
ficial family. 

This year proved no exception but 
the big mayoralty tree was put in- 
to place a day later than schedule. 
As circumstances alter cases, so did 
the pending controversy with the 
recalcitrant fire commissioners de- 
lay the pleasant task of erecting 
the tree and decorating it in fitting 
style. 

It was last Friday, the day set for 
the trial of the suspended commis- 
sioners, that the office page accost- 
ed the Mayor bright and early in 
the morning and asked for instruc- 
tions. 

"I have the tree outside; shall I 
bring it in and decorate it," he in- 
quired. 

"Better wait a day," responded 
Rolph. "The fire commissioners are 
going to be tried in my office today 
and perhaps they'd imagine seeing 
little axes hanging from the tree. 
Better wait a day." 

# * # # 

The Municipal Mortuary 

The old order of things fast is 
passing out. What once was the 
morgue, grim and gloomy, now is 
the municipal mortuary, furnished 
in lavish style. It is a transforma- 
tion and the change has occasioned 
no end of comment. 

"With such a place, poor people 
will hold the funerals of their de- 
parted from the morgue," said one 
man who inspected the new insti- 
tution a few days ago." 

And truly it will be no surprise if 
such should prove to be a practice 
among the poor. The slabs of mar- 
ble are gone. The white sheets have 
vanished. In their stead have come 
neat tables, surmounted by cano- 
pies of white. 

The mortuary is carpeted and 
neat curtains shield the windows. 
Rockers and comfortable chairs are 
placed here and there.. 

Even a writing desk stands in a 
corner. Mourners whose departed 
ones rest in the Municipal Mortu- 
ary now may sit as though in their 
own homes and small compart- 
ments are provided to assure their 
privacy. Truly, times have changed. 

MONEY LOANED on Diamonds 
and Jewelry. 2 per cent per month. 
Columbia Loan Office, 3 Stockton 

street. Est. 1872 



Wedding Rings 

Watchmakers, Jewelers, Opticians. 
715 Market St., Nr. Third. 



10 



THE WASP 



Saturday, January 2, 1915 



THE TATTLER 



With the coming of the New Year 
there is always a change in the or- 
der of soiety's doings. The debu- 
tantes have had their share of en- 
tertainment, and a most unusual 
set of debutantes they have been, 
both in beauty and interest. The 
dancing organizations have held 
their meetings with but a few dates 
remaining on the calendar before 
the Lenten cessation. The charities, 
for the greater part, have received 
their quota of gain from the activi- 
ties of the smart world. And now a 
spirit of calm and somewhat of re- 
trospection and introspection has 
settled upon society and over the 
tea-cups, the conversation is devot- 
ed to the might-have-beens. 

Which reminds me of something 
I heard the other day at a small 
four o'clock tea where were gather- 
ed several of the matrons of the ex- 
clusive set whose names are a draw- 
ing card at all events with a wor- 
thy purpose as their reason for be- 
ing. 

Family Trees 

The conversation led to the recent 
Charity Bail, which as everyone 
knows is given yearly for the bene- 
fit of the Catholic Humane Bureau, 
a most worthy organization, which 
does much to ameliorate the lives 
of the little children and the moth- 
ers of the poor. This function is al- 
ways one of the brilliant events of 
the early season and is patronized 
and directed by some of the most 
prominent women of the smart set. 

Judging from what was said the 
other day, true Christian charity is 
a virtue sadly lacking in the hearts 
of many of the society women who 
lend their names towards its suc- 
cess. 

One would naturally think, with 
such a purpose in view, that every 
right-minded woman would sub- 
merge her alleged family tree and 
her own predilections and preju- 
dices in her zeal for the cause. Char- 
ity is a broad quality which does 




San Francisco's most fashionably- 
' dressed women wear IVY Corsets. 
; You can be more fashionably and 
| comfortably dressed in an IVY Corset 
| than by any corset you ever -wore. 

Prices, $1.00 to $35.00. 
; Corsets made to order. 

P O M I N 



Two Stores: 

243 POST STREET 

893 MARKET STREET. 

Expert fitters at your service. 



not admit of the questions "Who 
is who," and "What is what?" 

A Few Snobs 

Not so with the ultra-exelusives 
of San Francisco. This year so para- 
mount was the snobbery of several 
of the matrons with something to 
say about the Charity Ball that 
they absolutely refused to allow 
their names to appear on the list 
of patronesses if certain other ma- 
trons with just as much title to po- 
sition but not quite so aristocratic 
from a western point of view, were 
asked to assist. The result was that 
the Charity Ball, while rather suc- 
cessful was not such a brilliant 
achievement as formerly nor was the 
sum realized anything equal to 
what it had been in former years. 
Several of the Bureau's most ardent 
workers who had not been consid- 
ered of sufficient social importance 
to act as patronesses and who are 
gifted with a goodly share of the 
world's goods with which they are 
equally generous, did not respond 
with monetary help as spontane- 
ously as formerly. 

And this is not all. One of the 
truly charitable women on the com- 
mittee for the ball, was at the tea 
the other day, and she was not spar- 
ing in her criticism on the narrow- 
ness of the ideals of some of her 
co-workers. "Why," she said indig- 
nantly, "after appealing to people 
who did not happen to be in their 
'own set' for money both for boxes 
and tickets, some of them had the 
audacity to sit up and ridicule the 
clothes and guests of the very wo- 
men whose generosity and co-oper- 
ation had tended towards the suc- 
cess of the bail. 



"Just half of these - women," she 
continued,' lend their names be- 
cause they like to pose as philan- 
thropists. When it comes to real 
benevolence, they don't know what 
it means. They are quite willing to 
have their names appear in the pa- 
per as patronesses and box-holders, 
but when it comes to putting them- 
selves out a little bit by giving then- 
pictures as a drawing card or help- 
ing with the newspaper work, they 
shift the burden. And do you 
know, some of them even refused to 
work on the same committee with 
other women who did not happen 
to belong to their little narrow pro- 
vincial set." 
Truly did Hood write, 
"Alas for the rarity 
"Of Christian Charity 
"Unde rthe sun." 



Army Relief Ball 
Aside from the opening of the 
Civic Auditorium next week, the 
most interesting event, to come is 
the Army Relief Ball. It was to 
have taken place the middle of 
this month, but when a function 



of such civic importance came up as 
the opening of the Auditorium 
the patronesses and directors of 
the military ball graciously post- 
poned their affair until later in 
the year. 

This must be good news for the 
patronesses of the Mardi Gras who 
were greatly exercised because they 
feared that the Military dance com- 
ing so near the annual bal masque 
for the benefit of the Children's 
Hospital would interfere with the 
success of the latter. 

By the way nothing has been 
heard of the Mardi Gras for some 
weeks. There is rumor that it may 
become a thing of the past. Es- 
pecially will this one be so if the 
present plan of the University of 
California carries. The University 
is most anxious to annex the Child- 
ren's Hospital, but the Board of 
Directors is absolutely opposed to 
such procedure. On one side it is 
claimed that the annexation will 
mean the elimination of all wo- 
men physicians and surgeons from 
the staff. This would be a great 
injustice as some splendid work 
has been done at the hospital out 
on Sacramento street by the women 
of the medical profession. 

On the other hand those anxious 
for the annexation of the hospital 
maintain that the time is at hand 
when 'the University mus(t (have 
a children's Hospital. If it cannot 
have this one it will find one of its 
own. Which of course, would mean 
a division of interests and also of 
the sum which the public donates 
through the subscription and by 
co-operation in the Mardi Gras ev- 
ery year. 

But there is another side to this 
story that is affording many an in- 
teresting morsel for Dame Dowager 
and her tea-guests. 

The controversy has resolved it- 
self into a social war between the 
town and the Burlingame sets. 
There is a conservative coterie in 
San Francisco which rather scorns 
the less conventional activities of 
the Country Club faction. It is 
composed mostly of women who 
take life rather seriously and are 
interested in all things tending to- 
wards civic and economic better- 
ment. They have no pet charities 
but are active in all good causes. 
They are for the majority, members 
of old-established California famil- 
ies and all matters pertaining to 
the good of their state or city are 
of vital importance to them. These 
are the women who are desirous 
of having the Children's Hospital 
annexed to the University. 

On the other hand the Children's 
Hospital has been the pet charity 
of a number of peninsular sets. Ev- 
ery year they work unceasingly for 
the success of the Mardi Gras, 
which usually means that the Hos- 
pital is several thousands of dol- 
lars richer. 

* * * * 

Carnival Spirit Waning 

Of late years, however, the enthus- 
iasm for the Mardi Gras has died 
out. Last year it was almost a trav- 
esty on the name. Since the days 



before the fire when these affairs 
were held in the Hopkins Art In- 
stitute and were arranged by art- 
ists who had tasted of life in the 
foreign ateliers, who had absorbed 
the abandoned holiday spirit that 
is a quality of the beauty-lover, 
there has been a gradual falling 
off both in attendance and enthus- 
iasm. The carnival spirit has ab- 
sented itself. The attendence has 
been made up almost entirely of 
society folk or those who wish their 
names "among those present". The 
artistic temperament is not interest- 
ed in the doings of smart society. 
And what, indeed, is a carnival of 
any sort without the enthusiasm 
and abandon that is an element of 
democracy and a minus quantity 
in conventional society? 

Back From Honeymoon 
Mr. and Mrs. Edward Clinton La 
Montagne returned from their hon- 
eymoon in New York this week, 
which will be pleasing news to the 
society editors, for the La Mon- 
tagnes always make good copy. 

Mrs. La Montagne as Otilla Laine 
was one of the most popular girls 
ever made welcome to the San Fran- 
cisco smart set. With her mother, 
Mrs. J. R. Laine, she came here sev- 
eral years ago from Sacramento 
where the late Dr. Laine was a 
prominent physician and surgeon. 
Such was her daughter's sweetness 
of disposition and natural charm 
of manner that she won her way to 
everyone's heart. As her father 
died when she was quite young she 
and her mother were most compan- 
ionable and this environment in- 
stilled into the young girl's life a 
consideration for older people 
which is not in the majority of mod- 
ern society girl's category. 

When her engagement to Clinton 
La Montagne was announced, en- 
tertainment for the bride-to-be was 

THE 

Ampico Player Piano 
$1035 

Monthly Payments if Desired 
There can be hut one best of any- 
Ihing — unquestionably (he best in 
pianos is the world famed Ktiabe. 

If you wish to regard only quality, 
then we present to you the Knabe 
"Ampico" Player Piano. The 

"Ampico" Player combines the ut- 
most ease of pedaling and every re- 
finement of expression devices, in- 
cluding the marvelous Flexotone. The 
Knabe "Ampico" is especially con- 
structed for those who want the ab- 
solute best regardless of price. 

Your present Piano accepted as 
part payment. 



^tJ^pW) 



26 O'Parrell Street 

Oakland Store 473 12th Street 

Bacon Block 



(iray hair restored to its natural col 
or by Alfredum's Egyptian Henna — a 
perfectly harmless dye, and the effect 
is immediate. Tnj most certain and 
satisfactory preparation for the pur- 
pose. Try it. At all druggists. — Advt 



Saturday, January 2, 1916 

the mood of the hour. Not 
the engagement of Mr. and Mrs. Tal- 
bot Walker (Miss Mary Keeney has 
there been such enthusiasm. Ac 
cording to the bavardes, the func- 
tions given for .Miss I. aim- outnum- 
bered by sixteen tli given for 

.Mi-- Eeeney. The latter, however, 
had confined her acquaintances 

stlj to those with whom she had 

grown nil. .Mi-,- Laine aum 
her friends as myriad in all the 
varied cliques in society here and 
across the Bay. Also Clinton I. a 
.Montague, being the son of .Mis. 
Charles .Maud, and the grandson oi 
that distinguished grand dame. 
Mrs. Clara Darling, contributed his 

share towards his bride to lie's pop- 

ularity, 

At present the La -Montagne- aiv 
in Monterey where they are the 
guests of the Charles .Mauds. 

Phyllis de Young Popular 
Phyllis de Young has been pro- 
i laimed one of the most popular 
gills in society. At every tea-dance 
you see her surrounded by a squad 
of admiring swains, and there has 
been much conjecture as to the fav- 
ored suitor. Miss de Young is vot- 
ed by many to be the most attract- 
ive of all the very charming de 
Young girls. She is a tall, sprightly 
blonde, with a vivacity and spon- 
taneity that just blbbles over. She 
is very proficient in the new steps 
and is a linguist of no mean ac- 
complishment. When the Leipsic 
was here before the war and Baron 
von Sehack, the German vice-con- 
sul entertained at a dinner dance 
at the San Mateo Polo Club in hon- 
or of the German officers, Miss de 
Young was the only society giii 
who could converse easily with the 
foreigners. 

One of her most attentive admir- 
ers at present is Walter Martin, 
the son of John Martin. He has 
been a follower in her wake ever 
since she has been out. Jack Nev- 
ille has also been seen with her 
frequently. In fact his attentions 
have been so assiduous at the var- 
ious golf tournaments that they oc- 
casioned some calculation as wheth- 
er the "Examiner was playing up 
to the "Chronicle," Jack Neville 
being the golf expert on the former 
paper. George Bowles is another of 
society's cligibles who has shown 
a predilection for Miss de Young's 
company. It this should transpire 
into an engagemen, it would give 
food for much comment. As every- 
one knows Hiram Johnson and M. 
H. de Young are not the greatest of 



THK WASP 



N.Warshauer 



F.Warshauer 



Warshauer Brothers 

TAILORS 
49 Geary Street 

SAN FRANCISCO 



pal- in tin- world. George Bowles' 
sister is Mrs. Hiram Johnson Jr. 

'Amy Howies.. Therefrom eman- 
ate many imaginings both over the 
tea-CUps and in the political world. 

::- -::• -:. ■::■ 

A FOGCHASER 

A FRENCH scientist ha- evolved 
a method fur dissipating fog 
Upon rivers and bays, or rath- 
er for preventing its formation, a 
scheme that might meet with con- 
siderable favor among San Francis- 
cans. Th" system is simple, being 
merely the distribution of a thin 
lilm of oil upon the water to shut 
the air off from contact with the 
water surface. 

Experiments were going on at 
Lyons at the opening of the Great 
War. but since then have been stop 
ped, although scientists in other 
countries had taken it up and may 
Soon perfect it. The film of oil must 
be so thin that it is hardly to be 
-een; must be so formed as not to 
get in puddles but remain gener- 
ally distributed, and must be 
cheap. When the experiments had 
reached the end of July, the cost of 
the oil had been gotten down to 
about $30 per day, one distribution 
being made daily. 

As an utilitarian idea from the 
standpoint of the navigator, it 
must meet witli the approval of 
shipping men. But how about 
those who consider her fogs as a 
part of San Francisco's charm? And 
what's more, the chief reason for 
the marvelous complexions of San 
Francisco's womenfolk- To chase 
away the fog would indeed be a 
calamity for these. 

Now, if some other scientist could 
come along to devise a means for 
chasing away the fog that covers 
our brains on morning after (par- 
ticularly now when so many of us 
will be wondering what happened 
during the New Year celebration) 
a large number of San Franciscans 
would be more enthusiastic. 

If the war doesn't take off all the 
French and German scientists, there 
may still be hope for even that 
consummation, so devoutly to be 
wished. 

Cause for Thanks 

A FORMER newspaper man re- 
lates the following little inci- 
dent concerning the late Joa- 
quin Miller, "poet of the Sierras." 

"Some time ago I was employed 
as a cub reporter on a Los Angeles 
morning paper. Joaquin Miller, the 
poet, had ben engaged by the paper 
to visit some of the suburban towns 
and write his impressions of them. 

"As he was not familiar with the 
country, I was assigned to accom- 
pany him, as I 'could be |easily 
spared from the staff. On one occa- 
sion we visited a town in the foot- 
hills. One of the numerous dry 
towns in that vicinity. After view- 
ing the points of interest for mate- 
rial for his story and finding the 
weather a little sharp, Mr. Miller 
suggested that as it was rather 
chilly, 'a little drink of something 
wouldn't hurt us;' to which I 
agreed, but explained that it was 



a dry' town. 'We will ask the 
agent for the paper,' said .Mr. .Miller. 

i find that people connected with 
the newspaper business are usually 
well informed along this line.' go 
we went to a small bodf{ -tore 

which had the agency for the paper 
and explained the situation. The 
proprietor looked at US a moment 
and said: 'Thank the Lord, there 
is only one rum hole in this whole 
valley.' .Mr. .Miller replied: 'Thank 
the Lord there- one. Where is if?" 

THE NEW ZEITGEIST 

ACCORDING to President John 
(.'. Ilibben of Princeton, col- 
lege graduates on the average 
earn oly $6 per week at the start. 
He justifies this low earning power 
by saying. "It is our endeavor to 
create a high potential or mental 
possibility rather than actual at- 
tainment." 

In a Harvard address a few years 
ago, it was remarked by Owen Wis- 
ter that America possessod only 
three men of unquestioned pre-em- 
inence to whom advanced students 
could turn for academic tuition in 
their respective lines. While these 
statements may be challenged with 
some justice, one may realize the 
general truth behind them by con- 
trasting the vast sums we spend 
upon the architecture of our uni- 
versity buildings with the compara- 
tively small amount expended to se- 
cure great teachers, and noting the 
corresponding results. 

We are, without doubt, inclined 
as a nation, to consider efficiency 
only as something to be expressed 
along economic, industrial or me- 
chanical lines. It is not strange in 
a period when financial standing 
bulks large in the minds of a com- 
paratively young nation that the 
recognition of the learned classes 
should be less noticeable than in 
older states. Yet reactive tenden- 
cies from strictly utilitarian educa- 
tion are becoming evident. Indivi- 
dual and ideal aims in education 
are beginning to emerge. Already 
the salaries of college presidents 
and college teachers have increased, 
offering additional incentive for 
men of brains and scholarly attain- 
ment. Masters of industry are each 
year becoming more eager to add 
to their material success, mental 
and spiritual satisfactions. How- 
otherwise can we explain such es- 
tablishments as the Carnegie and 
Rockefeller foundations, the late 
Mr. Morgan's alliance with art, or 
the vast contemporary contribu- 
tions to educational, social and re- 
ligious enterprises, both at home 
and in foreign lands? 

There are, moreover, signs show- 
ing that the youth in our colleges 
are catching the "gleam" of ethical, 
social and artistic ideals. A stu- 
dent recently was overheard saying, 
"If I was to go through college 
again, I would take nothing prac- 
tical." There is in America a new 
quest for that kind of training 
which, as Novalis stated it, can 
teach a man to bake no bread, but 
can give him God, freedom and im- 
mortality. 



11 



These are the ideals of the new 
period which Dr. Ilibben and a 
hundred other clear-eyed educators 
in our country are now raising 
their voices to support—the ideals 
of mental resourcefulness and men- 
tal, creative productivity in an age 
in which scholarship and learning 
will possess a value for themselves; 
when our collegians shall appreci- 
ate that it is not merely the book 
one studies, but the way he studies 
it that counts: and that if he can 
capture in his four years in the uni- 
versity a thoughtful habit, a schol- 
arly capacity, the world will be en- 
riched by a man, proficient and self- 
reliant along any lines in which he 
may lie called upon to engage his 
disciplined powers. 

That such training is possible in 
a land where vocational and practi- 
cal education is both necessary and 
omnipresent, we confidently believe. 
Even the engineer and the prospec- 
tive business man must have his 
share to enable him to rise above 
his "specialty" to some real leader- 
ship in the realm of thought. Not 
that the college graduate may be 
able to deliver an oration in He- 
brew in the morning and in Latin 
in the afternoon, not that we must 
duplicate Oxford and Cambridge 
and teach chiefly the classics and 
mathematics to our undergraduates 
(yet the result of such English 
training in making resourceful col- 
onizers is significant), but that we 
should demand that a young man 
who has spent eight or ten years 
in our schools should have the abil- 
ity to think and to think inde- 
pendently, to discover the world of 
books and get a glimpse at least of 
those "durable satisfactions" not 
measurable in dollars. 

These graduates of mental caliber 
may get only $6 a week on the start, 
but sooner or later they will take 
their high places in the leadership 
of our modern life in the sense in- 
tended by the old Dr. Simeon, who 
upon seeing a college man ap- 
proach, exclaimed, "There comes 300 
men."— Christian Science Monitor. 



I 

(§ Phone Douglas 5370 

I M. E. GALLAGHER 

Si 2? 

1j Fancy, Street, Reception and Evening s» 

I GOWNS I 

| ji ji jt m 

•5 WEDDING TROUSSEAUX £ 

& J* Jt cSS f 

£ 95-97 Wnittcll Bldg., 166 Geary St. ^ 

ft San Francisco. ft 



I The "Frances" 

§> HAIKDRESSING AND 

S MANICURING PARLORS. 

1 110 GEARY STREET. 

ig Purchased and Now Conducted by 

I Iffrs. J. Williams | 

ii Formerly Manager Hair D.essing § 

£ Dept., The Emporium. *, 



12 



THE WASP 



Saturday, January 2, 1915 



Wall Street Mysteries 

The endeavor to "chloroform" 

Judge Crist. 

* * # » 

The present whereabouts of Pat- 
rick Calhoun, former president of 
the United Railroads. 

* * * * 

"Friendly suits"— and their rela- 
tion to "settlements out of court." 

-X- * * * 

Unlisted Stock Promotions in oil, 
lands and "other things." 

* -X- -X- -X- 

J. Pierpont Morgan's one (1) share 
of stock in the United States Steel 
Corporation— just sufficient for vot- 
ing requirements. 

-x- -x- * * 

The United States Steel Corpora- 
tion's subsidy to Andrew Carnegie 
of three hundred and fifty millions 
in bonds, plus that huge "bonus" 
of common stock and — why? 

* * * -x- 

The investigation (?) as to the 
ultimate destination of that $1,096,- 
000, taken by truckloads from the 
offices of the United Railroads and 
against which the latter hold Pat- 
rick Calhoun's unsecured note— 
which is valued at $1 by Jesse Lil- 
ienthal, now president of the 

United Railroads. 

-x- * -x- * 

Why Prank G. Drum, a director 
in the Crocker National Bank, was 
one of Jack Wilson's bail securities 
on an embezzlement charge, when 
Jack Wilson and his partner, Wil- 
brand, were already under criminal 
indictment for conspiracy to loot 
the Crocker Bank, of which Prank 
G. Drum is a director. 

-X * * * 

Federal Attorney Preston Probed 

On December 5, I asked why Fed- 
eral Attorney Preston hesitated to 
begin the trials of J. C. Wilson and 
his partner, Benjamin A. Wilbrand, 
on the criminal indictments secured 
by Federal Attorney McNab in the 
spring of 1913. 

These indictments accused both 
men of conspiring to rob the Crock- 
er National Bank through the de- 
falcation of Charles F. Baker, a for- 
mer assistant cashier of the bank, 
who is now serving his sentence at 
San Quentin. 

Last week Attorney-General Greg- 




SOHE ARE BORN TO GREATNESS: 50ME --ETC. 

THE MONEY MAKERS 



(By X-WALL) 



ory sent orders from Washington 
to Federal District Attorney Pres- 
ton to proceed with these suits, be- 
fore the government's case should 
be made hopeless by reason of ab- 
sent of recalcitrant witnesses. All 
of the witnesses are at present in 
San Francisco, excepting one, and 
his whereabouts are known to me. 
It is not yet very well known in 
San Francisco that the Department 
of Justice sent Special Agent Wil- 
liam M. Offley here from Washing- 
ton almost a month ago to investi- 
gate Preston's attitude on the Wil- 
son-Wilbrand indictments. Offley 
sent his report to Washington af- 
ter he had been but two days in 
San Francisco. 

Offley's report must have been a 
convincing and formidable argu- 
ment, for the attorney-general at 
once wired Preston to "get to 
work." Hence the date is set by 
Preston for trial, viz., February 23, 
1915. 

Preston has stated that he would 
not prosecute on account of lack of 
evidence; and yet Judge Van Fleet 
typified the grand jury's work as 
irresistibly correct in handing 
down the indictments. 

It is thrilling to contemplate 
Preston's statement that he does 
"not want to break my long record. 
I do not intend to pluck a plume 
from my cap by beginning a hope- 
less case." 

From all of which we can assume 
that the department at Washington 



THE ANGLO & LONDON PARIS 
NATIONAL BANK 



SAN FRANCISCO 




I 



Capital $ 4,000,000 

Surplus and Profits. 1,600,000 
Total Resources. . . . 40,000,000 

OFFICERS: 

Herbert Fleischhacker President 

Sig. Greenebaum. .Chairman of Board 
Washington Dodge. . . Vice-President 
J. Friedlander Vice-President 

j C. F. Hunt Vice-President 

R. Altschul Cashier 

C. R. Parker Assistant Cashier 

.Win. H. High Assistant Cashier 

H. Choynsbi Assistant Cashier 

G. R. Burdick Assistant Cashier 

G. I*. Herr .... Assistant . Cashier 
A. L. Langerman Secretary 



High 

Grade 

Municipals 

Free from the expense and. annoy- 
ance of the Federal 
Income Tax 

Byrne & 
McDonnell 



NEW YORK, NEWARK, 
SAN FRANCISCO 



has instructed Preston not to fret 
himself about the prospective loss 
of a plume or two. It will be exalt- 
ing to hear what the complacent 
Charles F. Baker will tell, should 
Preston call him to the witness 
stand. 

One of Preston's reasons for ig- 
noring a public demand to try 
these suits is that he docs "not 
want to hurt the Crocker National 
Bank." Preston should worry! Is 
not Frank G. Drum a director of 
the Crocker Bank — and, is not 
Drum also on the bail bond of 
Jack Wilson? 

E. F. Hutton and Company 
Settlement 

After all, it appears that E. F. 
Hutton and Company did not care 
to take any chances in court on 
that "friendly" suit of the Crocker 
National Bank against them to re- 
cover $95,000 sunk by Assistant- 
Cashier Charles F. Baker, of the 
Crocker National aBnk in gamb- 
ling trades with that firm. 

This suit was in reality pressed by 
"Lloyds" who bonded Baker with 
the Crocker National aBnk. Baker 
must have meen both plastic and 
pliant, to have "dropped" such a 
large sum of money in such a brief 
space of time without ever having 
had a show for his "white alley." 

Branch Bank at Fair Grounds 

The establishing of a branch bank 
by the Anglo-California Trust Com- 
pany at the Exposition Grounds 
adds greatly to the convenience of 
visitors who attend the coming Ex- 
position. The bank, located as it 
is near the Fillmore Street entrance, 
is easily accessible to all who visit 
the Fair. 

A general banking business will 
be conducted, and the building 
erected is most artistically construc- 
ted, being one of the most attract- 
ive structures on the grounds. 



IMPORTANT NOTICE 

The editorial and business offices 
of The Wasp have been moved to 
The Bankers Investment Building, 
49 Geary Street. The telephone num- . 
ber has been changed to Douglas 
1871. 



Merchants Exhange Bldg. 
San Francisco, California 



The German Savings 
and Loan Society 

(THE GERMAN BANK) 
Savings Commercial 

Incorporated 1868 
626 California Street San Francisco 

Cal. 

Member of the Associated SavingB 

Banks of San Francisco. 

The following Branches for Receipt 
and Payment of Deposits only: 
Mission Branch, S. E. corner Mission 

and 21st Streets. 
Richmond District Branch, S. W. cor- 
ner Clement and 7th Ave. 
Haight Street Branch, S. W. corner 
Haight and Belvedere. 

June 30th, 1914: 

A ase t s $58,656,635.13 

Capital actually paid up 

in Cash 1,000,000.00 

Reserve and Contingent 

Funds 1,857,717.65 

Employees' Pension 

Fund 177,868.71 

Number of Depositors 66,367 

Office hours: 10 o'clock A. M. to 
3 o'clock P. M., except Saturdays to 
12 o'clock M. and Saturday evenings 
from 6 o'clock P. M. to 8 o'clock P. 
M. for receipt of deposits only. 

For the 6 months ending June 
30th, 1914, a dividend to depositors 
of 4 per cent per annum was de- 
clared. 



Wells Fargo Nevada 
National Bank 

Of San Francisco 

Nevada Bank Building, 2 Montgomery St., 
N. E. Corner of Market St. 

Capital Paid Up $6,000,000.00 

Surplus & Undivided Profits 5,148,628.93 



Total $11,148,628.93 

OFFICERS. 

Isaias W. Hellman, President 
I. W. Hellman, Jr., Vice-Pres. 
F L. Lipman, Vice-Pres 
James K Wilson, Vice-Pres. 
Frank B. King, Cashier. 
C. L. Jacobs, Assistant Cashier 
W. McGavin, Assistant Cashier 
C. L. Davis, Assistant Cashier 
A. D. Oliver, Assistant Cashier 
A. B. Price, Assistant Cashier 
DIRECTORS. 

I. W. Hellman, Jr. 
A. Christeson 
Wm. Haas 
Hartland Law 
Henry Rosen f eld 
James L. Flood 
Chas. J. Deering 
James K Wilson 



laaias W. Hellman 
Joseph SIobs 
Percy T Morgan 
F. W. Van Sicklen 
Wm F. Herrin 
John C. Kirkpatrick 
J. Henry Meyer 
A. H Payson 



F L. Lipman 
ACCOUNTS INVITED 

Prompt Service, Courteous Attention, Un- 
excelled Facilities. 
SAFE DEPOSIT VAULTS 



Saturday, January 2. 1915 



nil WASP 



13 




Tin' monthly dance of the Con- 
cordia ('lull held last Sunday even- 
ing, proved an unusually enjoyable 

alt'air to the scores of gay couples 
sharing in the merriment. The ball 
was preceded by a number of din- 
ners tendered by the members of 
the organization to their friends. A 
jinks was given by the club last 
week at which pleasant entertain- 
ment was offered. 

An annex to the club building is 
tn be erected and a swimming tank 
will be an important feature of the 
new structure. 

-X- « * * 

Members of the Press Club and 
their invited guests saw the old 
year out ami heralded 1015 with a 
brilliant dansant. Under the di- 
rection of W. R. Davenport, the 
ballroom in the Press Club's spa- 
cious home was beautifully decor- 
ated. 

Jolly suppers followed the ball 
and " the new year was welcomed 
amidst much merriment. The en- 
tertainment was in charge of Wal- 
demar de Bille and Clyde Westover. 

A Christmas jinks also took place 
at the Press Club following the op- 
en-air concert held at Lotta's Foun- 
tain on Christmas eve under the 
auspices of that organization. May- 
or Rolph, in a fitting speech, de- 
clared that the outdoor concert 
was one of the greatest gifts a club 
ever had given the city. 
* -x- * -x- * 

A pleasant entertainment was en- 
joyed New Year's eve by the mem- 
bers of the Beresford Club and their 
guests. The beautiful clubhouse 
was artistically decorated. 

The evening's program was re- 
plete with novelties which met with 
keen applause from those present. 




MEDICINAL MINERAL 

A Proven Natural Remedy for 

Rheumatism, Catarrh, Stomach Trouble 
Diabetes, Bright' s Disease, Piles 

Eczema, Ulcers, Poison Oak 

Sold by All Leading Druggist,, 




Dancing brought the Festivities to 
a gay dose. 

***** 

Arrangements are being complei 
I'd for the 1915 ball to be given by 
the Deutsche! club Friday evening, 
January 8th, at Nat ive Sons' Hall. 

Especial attention is being given 
by the committee in charge of the 
decorations, which, it is promised; 
"ill I" 1 unique, surpassing any- 
thing of its kind ever seen before. 
The musical program will consist of 
selections from prominent Califor- 
nia composers. 

***** 

The Papyrus Club is preparing to 

entertain on an extensive scale the 
prominent writers and aitists who 
are expected to come to San Fran- 
cisco for the Exposition. A num- 
ber of other activities along divers 
lines also are in contemplation. 

Officers for the ensuing year were 
elected by the California New Eng- 
land Association Chapter No. 1, at 
its meeting last week. The follow- 
ing were chosen to head the organ- 
ization: Mrs. C. F. Emery, presi- 
dent; Miss E. A. Oilman, recording 
secretary; Mrs. G. H. Chase, finan- 
cial secretary; and Dr. N. K. Foster, 
treasurer. 

Members of the Arion Club, one 
of the best known local singing or- 
ganizations, held open house on 
New Year's Day at the German 
House, in keeping with their an- 
nual custom, and received scores of 
their friends. Good wishes were ex- 
changed throughout the day and 
the affair proved a happy social 
gathering. 

Elaborate preparations are un- 
der way for the annual Christmas 
jinks of the Bohemian Club which 
will take place on Saturday evening 
■January 9th. A number of novel 
features are planned by those in 
charge and as to their nature strict 
silence is being maintained. There 
will be music and other forms of en- 
tertainment. 

The Christmas jinks has become 
an institution with the Bohemian 
Club and is awaited with keen de- 
light by the Bohemians. The affair 
will be for members only. 

John McCormaek, the noted tenor 
was entertained at luncheon at the 
Bohemian Club last week by Henry 
Hadley. 



(Continued from page 5) 
son of Judge and Mrs. August H. 
Bode of Cincinnati. The wedding 
is to take place in the spring, when 



-ill "i the sisters of the bride will 
return home for the gaieties. 

• * * * 

Departs for the South 

.Mrs. Neville Castle is spending 
the holidays in Atlanta, Georgia, 
whither she went to be present at 
the debut of her daughter Miss 

Robina II •>■. who is spending the 

winter in the "New York" of the 
South. Miss Henry is very much 
like her mother, being quite tall 
and very fair, and she will be a 
great belle when she makes her de- 
but here next winter. In the south 
the girls have their coming out par- 
ties when they are much younger 
than the California buds, so al- 
though only just eighteen, Miss 
Henry belongs to Atlanta's debu- 
tante set. Mrs. Castle was looking 
even more striking than usual be- 
fore she left in an all-lavender cos- 
tume. She and her dearest pal, 
Mrs. William E. Dargie of Oakland, 
who have always been called day 
and night on account of the ex- 
treme contrasts of their coloring, 
were teaing together at the St. Fran- 
cis just prior to the stunning 
Kate's departure for Dixie Land. 

* -* * * 

A Dancing Party 

Several congenial spirits enjoyed 
the hospitality last week of Hubert 
E. Law, who gave an informal danc- 
ing party in honor of Mr. and Mrs. 
Edward De Witt Taylor. Mr. Law's 
invitations are always very eagerly 
sought after, as one can always 
count on his having something 
quite unusual. His tall narrow 
home on California street, directly 
opposite the Pacific Union Club, 
has often been called the house of 
mystery, for nary a sign of a win- 
dow is there except in the front 
and back, the whole center being 
illuminated by sky-lights. 

It is a veritable white marble 
palace, with a white marble inner 
court where a rainbow colored 
fountain plays. A very up-to-date 
ball-room Mr. Law boasts of where 
the guests made merry. Mrs. Tay- 
lor, who is an unusually versatile 
dancer, delighting her appreciative 
audience with many exhibition 
dances. 

-X- -X- -X- * 

Friends of Algernon Crcfton, a 
San Francisco attorney, will be glad 
to hear that he is now out of dan- 
gei and on the road to recovery. 
Mr. Crofton has been at Adler's 
Sanatorium for four weeks past in 
the charge of Dr. Cooper and Dr. 
Selfridge, assisted by a battery of 
nurses. Mr. Crofton underwent two 
serious operations and will spend 



a month or six weeks at Coronado 
before returning to work. 



Select Assort- 
ment of fine 
candies and 
patisserie. 



Telephones 

Douglas 3266 
Douglas 3267 




French Confectioner/ 



Ice cream to 
order. Wedding 
cakes and 
cream cakes a 
specialty. 

********** 




211 Powell Street 
San Francisco, California 



At Fred Solaris 

The Presidio 500 Club gave a sur- 
prise party at Fred Solari's Grill to 
.Mrs. G. Y. Wisser, president of the 
above club, who sails for Honolulu 
on the U. S. Transport, Jan. 5. 1915. 

The banquet hall was elaborately 
decorated, red being the color used. 
A beautiful Christmas tree added 
much to the completeness of the 
holiday season. Playing and sing 
ing made this a very happy gath- 
ering for all present. Those pre* 
cnt were: Mrs. John Wisser, Mrs. 
Frederick Funston, Mrs. Peter Mar- 
quart, Mrs. Wm. H. Tobin, Mrs. F, 
Turtle, Mrs. T. H. Reese, Mrs. Geo 
Geyer, Mrs. H. D. Mitchell, Mrs. A 
Hickox, Mrs. Wm. Lewis, Mrs. Lil- 
lian Baxter, Mrs. Wm. Brooks, Mrs 
Alfred Hunter, Mrs. Frank Roach 



<-Jh=L) 



ohte 




A box of our delicious candy is the 
best kind of a present. Get our illus- 
trated catalogue. It will help you to 
select. 

GEO. HAAS & SONS 

FOUB CANDY STOKES 

Main Store and Office, 770 Market Street 



For Health, Strength 

Damiana Bitters 

Naber, Alfa & Brune, Agents. 

935 HOWARD STREET 

Opposite New Montgomery Street 



WANTED ! 

Diamonds Pearls 

HIGHEST CASH VALUE PAID 

PAWN TICKETS BOUGHT 

Phil. Schuman, Whitney Bldg., 133 

Geary Street, Boom 524. 

Tel. Douglas 4125. 



£ Phone Douglas 4393 



g MME. H. E. BUEDELL, Corsetiere. = 

| THE CORSET SHOP I 

EXCLUSIVE AGENTS -1 

1 BEIN JOLIE. LA PRINCESSE and = 
I HENDERSON CORSETS. - 



s 210 Stockton St., bet. Geary & Poat ~ 
^ San Francisco. p 

%llllllllllllllllllllllllllllllll#%U\ < *%lllllllllllllllllllllllllllllul^ 



14 



THE WASP 



Saturday, January 2, 1915 



iECHAU : TAVERN. 



Cor. Eddy and Powell Sta. 
Phone Douglas 4700 

A HIGH-CLASS 
FAMILY CAFE 

Where patrons are constantly surrounded 

by an air of refinement and respectability 

Informal Dansant Every Evening 1 at 

Nine Except Sunday 

Under the management of 

A. C MOERISSON 



Where to Dine Exclusively 

San Francisco's Latest Cosmopolitan 
Rendezvous, 

The Cafe des Gastronomes 

At the New Hotel Senate 
Turk and Larkin Streets 
The American Gastronom, 

J. C. LEHNER, M .C. A. 



Who has pleased the palates of all 
the present warring Kings, Poten- 
tates and America's Greatest States- 
men, will endeavor to entertain the 
EPICURES and BON VIVANTS in 
this city. Special New Tear's Eve 
Supper. Phone reservations Pros- 
pect 3020— BERNARD ORGAN, Mgr. 



IJimnmuimmm n niniiiiii m in tnr i ir rni mjLT 



Portola-Louvre 

RESTAURANT 

Powell at Market Sts. 

O. O. Swanberg, Pres. and 

Gen. Mgr. 
Alexander. Mgr. 
After Theatre 
Supper and 
Dansant 
Wednesday 
and Friday 
Evenings at 9:' 
A Glimpse 
into Bohemia. 
Entertainment 
Pining 

PORTOLA- 
LOUVRE 

The Temple of 
San Francisco's 
Gaiety. 




;iiii:i:ii!i!iiiiiniiiiui[iiMi!iji;rii!:i;i!iii!iiiii!i:iin 



J.-B. Pon J. Bergez 0. Lalanne 

C. Mailhebuau L. Coutard 



Bergez- Frank's 

OLD 




..Poodle Dog.. 

Hotel Co. 

and 

Restaurant 



Music and Entertainment Eyery Evening 

416-421 BUSH STREET 

(Above Kearny) 

SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 

Exchange Douglas 2411 



PEDERAL CLUB 

32 TURK STREET 

San Francisco's Popular Rendezvous 

for Sportsmen 



Th«WEA\JTIFUL 




Dance Hall 



Buffet 



Ostracism 

G. Vere Tyler has at last, so he 
thinks, solved the secret of com- 
fortable living for the working girl 
and also how to force her to be 
moral. 

"The only possible remedy for 
working girls," he says, "to live 
comfortably on a small salary is to 
club together." 

"In this manner, a certain amount 
of money could be deducted for per- 
sonal raiment." 

"If these girls take an interest in 
what each one can buy in the mat- 
ter of clothing, with the money tak- 
en out for the purpose, the compe- 
tition to look well would become 
stimulating without the attendant 
envy that the individual incurs." 

Also, in this manner, Mr. Tyler 
kindly proceeds to say: "It would 
be easy to detect the girl living 
beyond her means and they could 
ostracise her from their club on the 
ground of immorality — whereas in 
standing alone the lie, while sus- 
pected, could not be proved." 

I pause here to inquire of Mr. Ty- 
ler how many men would be ad- 
mitted to membership in any club 
if chastity were one of the essen- 
tials? I venture to say that about 
one man in a million would be eli- 
gible to qualify. 

Moral cleanliness is one thing to 
which most men do not aspire; and 
the reason is that women have nev- 
er requnired it of them. 

When moral women ostracise men, 
then we shall have no need for a 
Bed Light Abatement Law. Chil- 
dren will be no longer born mental- 
ly and physically defective. Every 
mother teaches her daughters that 
marriage is the price they must 
bring. 

When a girl undersells the market 
she is made to suffer. The younger, 
more inexperienced, and above all, 
the poorer she is, — the more cruelly 
she is punished by the world. We 
do not need Mr. Tyler or any other 
man to volunteer and new methods 
of detecting immorality in women, 
and means of ostracising them for 
it; for women are past mistresses in 
the art of doing both and they al- 
ways will be so until there is but 
one standard of morality. 

I hold no brief for immorality, nor 
do I believe that the single stand- 
ard of morality means that women 
should be allowed to adopt the vices 
of men. On the contrary, women 
should demand that men adopt the 
highed standard. 

Let us hear less about "ostracism" 
of women and more of kindly help 
and love for them. 

Let us listen to the Great Human- 
itarian, who did not advocate os- 
tracising anyone,— but Who said: 



"Let him who is without sin cast 
the first stone." 

Now if we would be quite honest 
with ourselves, we should find that 
but few of us have any stones to 
cast. On the contrary, we would 
discover that our collections really 
consist of a few pebbles far too 
small to be thrown with sufficient 
force or accuracy to hurt anyone. 



HIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIUIIIIIIIIIIIIIllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllL 



fee 




It was announced in this column 
some weeks ago that the officials of 
the Exposition had appointed a 
golf committee, which is to take, full 
charge of all things of a golfing na- 
ture in San Franciscso during the 
life of the 1915 Pair. The idea ap- 
pealed to local golfers and they ap- 
proved the step taken. 

Weeks have slipped by, however, 
the Exposition will open in less 
than sixty days, and the committee 
has done nothing in the way of 
arranging matches, tournaments, 
and so-forth. It looks to the writer 
as though now is the time to make 
arrangements with the professional 
and amateur players of this and 
other countries. The top-notch 
players are always in demand, and 
if San Francisco does not hasten to 
make a few engagements with them, 
there will be no golf tournaments 
of national import here in 1915. 

■X- * -X- * 

Every golfer has his favorite cad- 
dy or type of caddy. Some players 
want a talkative, sympathetic little 
beggar to carry their clubs, while 
other golfers want "just a chaser 
of balls." You will And these two 
opposite types of players and a var- 
iety of all classes of caddies on ev- 
ery course. The following story 
shows the peculiarities of still an- 
other genius of club carrier, says 
Pacific Coast Golfer. 

It seems that a well-known 
American golfer, who played several 
rounds this summer on one of the 
great Scotch courses, had this amus- 
ing experience: He had one of 
those native caddies, a man in years 
with an ostermoor beard, which 
would have been a natural hazard 
had the ball sought its depths. He 
had played the game from child- 
hood and knew every inch of the 
long-club course. One day during 
a round this sixty-year-old caddy 
doled out the club he thought 
proper for each shot, regardless of 
any preference on the part of the 
American player. Th eclimax came 
at one tee when, after offering a 
driver, he jrushed forward .again 
just as the player was about to 
make the stroke, exclaiming: "Hoot, 
mon! I hev deceeded to play the 
shote wi' ma cleek!" Can you beat 
it? 




= The Mark of the Candy of Character 



mi( 



Small Blacks"] 

A COFFEE CONFECTION f 



S Half As Sweet As Other Candy 3 

= More Than Twice As Good = 

| 10c, 50c and $1 PACKAGES | 

| The Golden Pheasant I 

| 32-36 GEARY STREET 

Iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiniiiiiiiiii mini 




Iseimai/v 



HOTEL AND RESTAURANT 

54 - 68 ElllB Street 

Our Cooking Will Meet Your Taste. Oar 
Prices Will Please You. 



The New 

POODLE DOG 




HOTEL & RESTAURANT 

WILL REMAIN AT CORNER 

POLK and POST 

SAN FRANCISCO 

Telephones: Franklin 2960; Home C 6706 



Pearl Oyster House 

Phone Douglas 4788 

FISH AND SHELLFISH 

In AH Ita Varieties 

Pine-St. Entrance, California Market 



Phone China 571 



ShanghaiLow 

Chop Suey and Noodles 

Purnishes the Very Best Chop 
Suey and Oriental Dishes in the 
Finest Home like Dining 1 Boom in 
the City. 

Pirst Class Service, Special Booms 
for Ladies 

532 GRANT AVENUE 

£ Between California and Fine Sts. 

VttvvVVVVVVVVvVVVVVVVVVV* 



Saturday. January 2, 1915 



THE WASP 



15 



THINGS 
WE 
, SHOULDN'T 
KNOW 




THE SEARCH FOR GENIUS 

Every time a magazine editor gets 
the floor, or space in a literary pe- 
riodical, lie is almost certain to talk 
or write about the continual search 
that goes on in magazine editorial 
rooms for as-yet-unrecognized tal- 
ent. We are assured that highly- 
gifted readers spend hours daily go- 
ing through submitted manu- 
script, ever on the alert for new 
writers of ability. Some magazines 
tell about the welcome which "un- 
known" writers will receive if they 
submit real copy. 

There is a man in San Francisco 
who several months ago burst 
through the shell of no less a pub- 
lication than the Saturday Evening 
Post. Since his initial peep, he has 
had several stories published in 
that widely-read periodical. 

But this man, when he hears 
about the "search for genius" which 
is alleged to be going on in such 
periodical offices, usually shrugs his 
shoulders and sniffs. On top of 
that he rolls a cigarette, the action 
being a bit of symbolism more em- 
phatic than delicate. For he uses 
"Bull" in the smoke-cylinders he 
makes. 

His experience with the S. E. P. 
was anything but indicative of a 
search for genius. He sent many 
Mss. to their offices and always they 
returned so fast that he wondered 
how the Postal Department did it. 
He became suspicious that his stuff 
was not being read at all. To find 
out positively, he placed a bit of 
stickum on the four corners of each 
page in his manuscript. In order 
to read the story, the pages would 
have to be pried apart. When that 
particular yarn came back, not a 
page-corner had been disturbed! 

Still convinced that his stories 
were "good stuff," he wrote to his 
friend Charles E. Van Loan, an ac- 
cepted standby in the pages of the 
S. E. P., and told his troubles. He 
also submitted to Van Loan some 
of the rejected stories. Van Loan 
pronounced them good and sent 
them, along with a personal letter, 
to the editor of the publication. 
The local man soon thereafter re- 
ceived checks from the S. E. P. and, 
in a letter from Lorimer himself 
was commended as a "regular writ- 
in' feller." 

Moral: One must have an intro- 
duction to the editor to "break 
into" fast literary company. 



O' 



LIFE IN SAN FRANCISCO 

Scene: Apartment House Lobby, 
anywhere in San Francisco, but far 



from the region of Powell street. 

Persons: The House Agent, a 
Man and a Woman applying for 
rooms. 

Agent: •You will take the $50 
apartment? Good. It shall be pre- 
pared for your arrival on Monday. 
But just one moment. Pardon the 
seeming indelicacy, but your name 
is Jones and this lady, is she Mrs. 
Jones, your wife?" 

Man: "What's all the row? Of 
course she's my wife. Such a ques 
tion!" 

Agent: "Of course, you do not 
understand, being here from New 
York. But, you see, we have a stat- 
ute on the California books which 
makes the business of running an 
apartment house a hazardous occu- 
pation. We must be sure, when we 
rent rooms, that the men and wom- 
en who will frequent them have a 
right to associate with each other 
so intimately. Ahem — pardon me 
for talking of such things, please, 
but I assure you our business is an 
extremely hazardous occupation — 
ahem — would you mind letting me 
see your marriage certificate?" 

Woman: "The idea! What in- 
sult is this you submit me to!" 

Agent: "I'm sorry, so sorry. I 
assure you it pains me more than 
it does you. But if I should rent 
this apartment to you and someone 
should learn— understand, I'm not 
saying it is so, but those things 
are not unheard of— that you were 
not properly married to this gentle- 
man with whom you will occupy 
the rooms, we would be liable to 
the closing of our place and the 
sale of our furniture. As I said be- 
fore, we are engaged in a hazardous 
occupation." 

Woman: "I'm sure I don't know 
where our marriage license is, al- 
though I know it is not in my 
trunks. But in any case, I'm cer- 
tain I should not bring it here to 
show you." 

Man: "Bather not, I should say!" 

Woman (to Man); "Let's go to 
Denver and have a summer in the 
hills." 

Man: "By Jove, a good notion. 
Let's go back to the hotel and 
pack." 

Man and Woman exeunt. Agent 
draws deep sigh. 

* -X- # * 

CAFE NOTES 

At Techau's the evening dansants 
continue to attract large crowds. 
Manager JHorrisson has arranged 
for the presentation of gifts to pa- 
trons, without competition. For 



Hi.' ordinary svening, in- announces, 
there is no need to make rosorva 
tions. 

-::■ ■::- -;: :: 

More than 75 members of the 
Commercial Travelers' Association 
held a banquet Saturday evening 
at the Odeon Cafe. The tables were 
attractively decorated and the af- 
fair was pronounced an unusual 
success. Speeches appropos of the 
occasion were made by various 
members, 

* # * # 

Mr. and Mrs. Joseph Rothschild 
were hosts to thirty friends at a din- 
ner last Saturday evening at Cop- 
pa's. The tables were artistically 
decorated and the function proved 
highly enjoyable. Dancing follow- 
ed the repast. 



IDLE TEARS 

Once upon a time tears were wom- 
an's strongest weapon. That they 
are so no longer is a wonderful 
tribute to the stronger personality 
of both sexes. Since women are now 
the true helpmates of men, they no 
longer attempt to rule them with 
the weapons of weakness. Women 
with personalities don't weep, ex- 
cept alone. In great grief they can- 
not cry. Weeping in solitude re- 
stores the balance of the soul, but 
the easy weeper has never a strong 
personality. 

Idle tears belong to weakness and 
sentimentality. Tears that are red 
with the sweat of anguish are never 
seen and never spoken of. It re- 
quires a trained will power and 
genuine emotion to hold back the 
tears that gather in the eyes, a 
stronger will power than that that 
carries the soldier through a rain 
of bullets.— Los Angeles Times. 



"Will you take this woman till 
death do you part?" 

"Can't you make it an indetermin- 
ate sentence?"— Town Topics. 



When you go broke at treating, 
mate, 
Your friends look blank and 
stolid; 
But long as you can liquidate 
The boys are for you solid. 

—New York Mail. 



f For Christmas and New Tear £ 

••I Gifts •!• 

.». $ 

? Trunks, Leather Goods and *t* 

£ Novelties. •{• 

X —Agency Taylor Trunks— % 

| The Travelers Trunk Co. $ 

•{• 61-63 O'Farrell Street •{• 

Y Telephone Dong-las 2180. *»* 

». . . »jlaaaAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAA 



Eames Tricycle Co. 




Manufacturers of INVA- 
LID ROLLING CHAIRS 
for all purposes. Self 
PropellingTricycle Chairf 
for the disabled. INVA 
LID CHAIRS. Whole 
sale and retail and for 
rent. 1714 Market St., 
San Francisco. Phone 
Park 2940. 1200 S. 
Main St., Loi Angeles. 



When You Say 
"Good Bye" 



lemember the quality of 
your Baggage means as 
Much to You as do the 
smart clothes you wear. 

Since 1867 we have 
been making right here 
in San Francisco smart 
Baggage for our Smart 
People. 

Our Fibre - Covered 
Wardrobe Trunks are 
meeting the approval 
of the most particular 
traveling public. 

SMART BAGGAGE FOR 
FORTY-SEVEN YEARS. 





Factory: Eighteenth and Folsom Streets 



m J. W. Elson M. Amber )? 

*•> Telephone Kearny 5756 Sy 

I * 

I Amber & Elson I 



TJail 



d $mp orters 



ors an c 

$ 33 NEW MONTGOMERY ST. ^ 

t§ (Opposite Palace Hotel Entrance.) (j* 

<§ San Francisco, Cal. rt* 



PHONE DOUGLAS 4752 



BLAKE 5 



PHOTO STUDIO 



Smart Posing- — latest Stylei 
Popular Prices 



lOl GEARY STREET 

PARAGON BUILDING SAN FRANCISCO 

Satisfaction Guaranteed 



WALTERS SURGICAL CO. 

SURGICAL INSTRUMENTS 
393 Sutter St., S. F. Phono Douglai 4011 



INSTITUTE or 
AT HOME 



NEAL 



TREATMENT 
FOR 



DRINK or DRUGS 

No hypodermic injections. Modern methods, 
no bad after-effects. Utmost privacy. For full 
particulars, address: 

NEAL INSTITUTE 

1409 SUTTER STREET, SAN FRANCISCO. 

Telephone Franklin 1098. 

Sixty Neal Institutes in the United States 

and Canada. 



16 



THE WASP 



Saturday, January 2, 1915 




er will amuse with their musical 
sketch "Under the Gay White 
Lights" and The Avon Comedy 
Pour, Goodman, Kaufman, Smith 
and Dale will appear in the farce 
"The New Teacher" which is an ex- 
cellent vehicle for the introduction 
of comedy and song. 



Cort to Have One More Week of 
Forbes-Robertson 

"Hamlet" will open Sir Johnston 
Forbes-Robertson's third and posi- 
tively last week at the Cort Thestre 
on Monday night. "Passing of the 
Third Floor Back" will be played 
on Tuesday and Wednesday night. 
The first and only matinee perform- 
ance of "The Light that Failed" 
will be given on Wednesday. "Ham- 
let" will be repeated on Thursday 
night and "The Light that Failed" 
on Friday. The last performance of 
"Hamlet" will be given at the Satur- 
day matinee. Forbes-Robertson will 
make his farewell appearance on 
the San Francisco stage on Satur- 
day night, January 9, in "Passing 
of the Third Floor back." 

Forbes-Robertson's intention to 
retire at the close of his present 
tour is final. He will never come 
back to America as an actor, though 
he will probably return to this 
country as a private citizen. He 
frankly says that it is due to 
America's generous and kindly en- 
couragement that he is able to quit 
the stage while he is still at the 
zenith of his powers. 

Miss Laura Cowie has been ap- 
pearing in the leading feminine 
roles in Forbes-Robertson's reper- 
toire. This young actress is only 
twenty-two years old. She has been 
on the stage but four years, but 
during this time has advanced far. 
She has been seen in four widely 
different roles with Forbes-Robert- 
son and her work in these parts 
augurs well for her future. It is 
said that she is to remain in this 
country after Forbes-Robertson re- 
turns to England. 

The Chicago Tribune Belgian War 
Pictures come to the Cort for one 
week, commencing Sunday, Janu- 
ary 10. 



Orpheum 

Alice Lloyd, who is repeating her 
former triumphs at the Orpheum 
will begin the last week of her en- 
gagement next Sunday matinee. 
The remainder of the program will 
include seven new acts and one 
holdover. 

The Bell Family, consisting of 
nine brothers and sisters, hail from 
Mexico and are probably the only 
natives of that country presenting 
a musical offering in vaudeville. 
They are capital vocalists and sing 
a number of their native songs and 
perform several national dances. 

Florenz Kolb and Adelaide Har- 
land garbed respectively as a Dutch 
boy and girl, will introduce a musi- 
cal satire called "Evolution" the 
dates of which are 1860 and 1920. 



Pierre Pelletier and his company 
will present a thrilling comedy and 
dramatic play of the New York un- 
derworld by Harold Selman entitled 
"The 10:40 West." 

The Spinette Quintette, three 
young men and two women, are 
described as upside down dancers. 
The three male dancers stand on 
their heads on stools fixed under 
pedestals with a floor roof on which 
they dance. 

Chinko the youthful juggling 
genius will perform a number of 
novel equilibristic and juggling 
feats of an astounding nature. Min- 
nie Kaufman the foremost lady 
trick cyclist in the world will in- 
troduce a marvelous act which com- 
bines grace, skill and daring. 

Johnny Cantwell and Reta Walk- 



"TAINTED JOURNALISM" 

Whenever lecturers, ministers, pol- 
iticians (who haven't much sup- 
port) and others are in need of a 
subject for their discourses, they 
pick on the newspapers. Here in 
San Francisco we were treated, the 
other day, to a trans-bay divine's 
notions of "What I would do if I 
ran a newspaper." Two hundred 
words from a man who actually 
does run one, set him on his head. 

Not so full of suggestion and with 
a great deal more "inside" informa- 
tion is a recent address by the not- 
ed journalist-preacher Dr. Washing- 
ton Gladden, given before the stu- 
dents of Kansas University. The 
title of his address, as it is now 
printed, is "Tainted Newspapers, 
Good and Bad." From which, pos- 
sibly, we are to understand there 




is something that might be called 
"good taint." 

The first thing Dr. Gladden is 
against in our newspapers is an al- 
leged "overstatement of facts." Not 
only in the newspapers, though, is 
this fault apparent, he points out. 
For even ministers frequently over- 
state the seating capacities of their 
churches, while chambers of com- 



CQR£ 



LEADING 

THEATRE 



Ellin and Market 
Phone Sutter 2460 



POSITIVELY PAKEWELL WEEK 

OF 

FORBES-ROBERTSON 

Begins Monday Night, January 4 
REPERTOIRE 
Monday, Thursday Eves and Saturday 
matinee, "Hamlet"; Tuesday, Wednes- 
day and Saturday Eves, "Passing of the 
Third Floor Back"; "Wednesday matinee 
and Friday evening, "Light That Fail- 
ed." 

Prices $2.00 to 50c 

Commencing Sunday Jan. 10 — The Chi- 
cago Tribune Belgian War Pictures — 
One Week Only. 

Safest and Most Magnificent Theatre in 
America. 



Week Beginning this Sunday afternoon 
(Malmee Every Duy.) 



ALICE LLOYD 

England's Uaintiest and Most Popular 

Comedienne 

In conjunction with 
A GREAT ROAD SHOW 
THE BELL FAMILY, nine brothers 
and sisters in an artistic musical of- 
fering; FLORENZ KOLB & ADELAIDE 
HAKLAND "Evolution;" PIERRE PEL 
LETIER & CO. in "The 10:40 West;" 
THE SPINETTE QUINTETTE, A nov- 
elty in black and white; CHINKO, the 
youthful juggling genius; MINNIE 
KAUFMAN, grace and skill; JOHNNY 
CANTWELL & RETA WALKER; THE 
AVON Ci i.MEHY F< Til in their farce, 
"The New Teacher." 

Evening Prices 10c, 25c, 50c, 75c. 

Matinee Prices (except Sundays and 

Holidays) 10c, 25c, 50c. 

PHONE nOETOLAS 70 



I Have Serv- 
ed Four Gen- 
erations 
WHY NOT 
YOU? 
T. LUNDY, JEWELER 

Estd. 1371. 718 Market St. 




FLORENZ KOLB and ADELAIDE HARLAND AT THE ORPHEUM 



WONG SUN YUE TEA GARDEN 

535 Grant Avenue 

One of the biggest atractions of 
Chinatown. Only two blocks from 
White House, at entrance to Chinatown. 
Admission (including tea service) 25c 

Served in the original Chinese way. 
Of easy access for tourists and visitors. 



Colgate's Preparations at the Tavern 
The ladies who are present at Techau 
Tavern on Saturday afternoons will be 
pleased to learn that the management 
has been successful in making arrange- 
ments to distribute the celebrated Col- 
gate preparations as souvenirs. Last 
Saturday Colgates Florient Perfume was 
presented to each lady guest and for 
some time to come various products of 
these well known perfumes will be giv- 
en as souvenirs on Saturdays. The In- 
formal Dansants on Monday, Wednes 
day and Friday evenings are becoming 
more popular each week, and there can 
be no doubt that the thoughtfulness of 
the management in providing fresh air 
for the dancing section has much to do 
with this popularity. 



Saturday, January 2, 1915 



THE WASP 



17 



merce never truthfully tell popula- 
tions. 

Our youthfulness is responsible 
for this, he smiles. "All this, <>f 
course, is in part the efflorescence ol 
hopefulness and enthusiasm, and 
We cannot judge it too severely.' 
he says. "Now I do not think it 
can be denied that the newspapers 
are doing a great deal to cultivate 
this vicious habit of exaggeration in 
speech. They are not the only pro- 
pogators of this vice; the ministers 
and churches.as I have said, arc a 
good second; and when the church- 
es and the newspapers combine to 
give the statistics of the current 
sensational evangelism, you get a 
result that makes Munchausen hide 
his diminished head." 

Another fault which Dr. Gladden 
finds with the public press is a 
tendency, most clearly defined, to 
set up a man's money and belong- 
ings above his character attain- 
ments. "Ask how much any man is 
worth and everybody begins telling 
you how much money he has,. No- 
body ever thinks of answering it 
in any other way. But it doesn't 
answer the question at all. What 
the man is worth to his family, to 
the community in which he lives, 
to the God who gave him life, is 
what you really want to know." 

By way of interpolation it might 
be said: "No, doctor, the dear pub- 
lie which reads the papers, is NOT 
interested in those things." 

The papers look for scandal, fin- 
ancial or social, too largely to make 
them good family reading, he as- 
serts. It is the bad things that 
count as news and not the good. 
He says it is the "most destructive 
influence at work in society." 

"Is it not a deplorable fact that 



anything which tends to discredit 
f your tellofl men should be re- 
garded m- good -tuir while that 
which tends to remove such .li- 
eredit, even when it la known to be 
unjust, is much less likely to and 

9paCC in tile news column - 

An answer to that might be that 
men aii' expected to do things that 
are a credit to them. And this is 

NOT news. It is when they step 
outside the path that they do the 

unusual thing, and it is the un- 
usual thing which constitutes news. 
The public is not interested in the 
fact that .limes keeps sober all the 

ti and keeps his family in funds 

at all time to the resultant happi- 
ness of his wife and family and self. 
But the public is interested when 
Jones robs a bank to play the 
races. Very much interested, for his 
peculations may affect their ac- 
counts. 

Dr. Gladden ends his discussion 
by pointing out four tasks that 
should, in his opinion, be carried 
out by American newspapers. These 
are: 

First: To teach the people to 
avoid exaggeration and violent 
speech, and to cultivate moderate 
and rational modes of expression. 

Second: To resist the tendencies 
which dematerialize democracy and 
which substitute the mob-mind for 
the deliberative habit. 

Third: To hold the popular judg- 
ment firmly to the truth that char- 
acter and manhood, and not money 
and popularity are the central val- 
ues of human existence. 

Fourth: To turn the thought of 
men more and more from the nega- 
tive virtue of detecting and expos- 
ing the evil, to the positive virtue of 
diseerning and praising the good. 





ILTMO 



i 





NEW YORK 

America's Latest and 

Most Refined and New ! 

York's Centermost Hotel 

Onlyholcl occupying an entire city 
block, Vandvrhllr And Madison Avs 
43d and 44th Sis., adjoining Grand 

Central Termii 
I0O0 rooms; 050 with bath- 

In.nji $L\..U i*i-i- il.iv, Sn 

to lri rooms for perms 
pancy. Large and imnll 

mot and dlnjae salons 

-pedal ly arranged f.i 

or private luoctiuus 

Cutitav Baumann, 

n McE. Bowr 
Vice- P res 





FORBES ROBERTSON AT THE C ORT 



DIVIDEND NOTICE 
SECURITY SAVINGS BANE, 316 
Montgomery Street. — For the half year 
ending December 31, 1914, a dividend 
upon all deposits at the rate of four (4) 
per cent per annum will be payable on 
and after January 2, 1915. 

S. L. ABBOT, Vice-President. 

LEGAL NOTICES 

SUMMONS TO ESTABLISH TITLE 
IN THE SUPERIOR COURT of the 

State of California in and for the City 

and County of San Francisco. 

Action No. 35277. 
Gerald C. Halsey. Attorney for Plaintiff. 
HARLOW W. CULVER and ELLA F. 

CULVER, his wife, Plaintiffs, 
vs. 
All persons claiming any interest in, or 

lien upon, the real property herein 

described or any part thereof, De- 
fendants. 

THE PEOPLE OF THE STATE OF 
CALIFORNIA: 

To all persons claiming any interest 
in, or lien upon, the real property here- 
in described or any part thereof, defend- 
ants, greeting: 

You are hereby required to appear 
and answer the complaint of HARLOW 
W. CULVER and ELLA F. CULVER. 
his wife, plaintiffs filed with the Clerk 
of the above entitled Court and City and 
County, within three months after the 
first publication of this Summons, and 
to set forth what interest or lien, if any, 
you have in or upon that certain real 
property or any part thereof, situated 
in the City and County of San Francis- 
co, State of California, particularly de- 
scribed as follows: 

COMMENCING at a point on the 
Northerly line of Hayes Street distant 
thereon Two Hundred and Thirty-four 
(234) feet 4- J/2 inches Westerly from 
the Westerly line of Baker Street; run- 
ning thence westerly and along said 
Northerly line of Hayes street Twenty- 
five (25) feet; thence at a right angle 
Northerly One Hundred and Thirty-sev- 
en (137) feet 6 inches; thence at a right 
angle Easterly twenty-five feet (25) 
feet; thence at a right angle Southerly 
One Hundred and Thirty-seven (137) 
feet 6 inches to the Northerly line of 
Hayes street and the point of com- 
mencement. 

BEING part of Western Addition 
Block No. 594. 

And you are hereby notified that, un- 
less you so appear and answer, the 
plaintiffs will apply to the Court for the 
relief demanded in the complaint, to- 
wit: That it be adjudged that the plain- 
tiffs are the owners of said property in 
fee simple as absolute; that their title 
to said property be established and 
quieted ; that the Court ascertain and 



II estates, rights, titles, m- 

me in and to said prop- 

every part thereof, whether 

raJ or equlta I 

or in ted or contingent and 

■ same consists of mori 

plain- 
tires rt co herein and have 
and further relief us may be 
meet li 

WITNESS nay hand and the seal of 
this 29th day of December. 
V i'. 1914. 

H. I. MULCREVY, Clerk. 
Bj S. I. Hughes, l ieputy Clerk. 
Phe Oral publication of this summons 
was made in The Wasp newspaper on 
1 1"' 2m January, A. D., 1916. 

The following pei sons a re said to 
claim an Interest in, or lien upon, said 
pi open ad^ ei se to plaintiff. 
Bank of Italy j a corporation, Mont- 

iry and Cluy Streets, San Fran 

California 

Gerald O. Ilalsey, Attorney for Plain- 
tiffs, Rooms 501-502-603 California-Pa- 
cific Building, 106 Montgomery Street, 
San Francisco, Cal, 



NOTICE OP TRUSTEE'S SALE OP 
KEAL ESTATE 

Whereas .maky G. BURKE, (a wid- 
ow) of the County of Alameda, State of 
California as party oi the first part, did 
execute a certain deed of trust dated the 

6th daj cl r, A. D. 1914, to JO- 

SEPH E. BIEN and G. 111NES, as par- 
ties of the second part and as trustees 
for the benefit and security of Irraa 
tilnes, wiiiru deed Of trust was record- 
ed in the ollice of the County Recorder 
of Alameda County, State of California, 
on the 8th day of October, A. D. 1914, 
in volume of 2271 of Trust Deeds, page 
291 et seq., 

Now, Therefore, in accordance with 
the terms and under the authority of 
said deed of trust, and in pursuance of 
an application and notification by said 
Irma Hines, the holder of a certain 
promissory note made by the said 
Mary E. Burke (a widow) to said Irma 
Hines, to secure the payment of which 
said promissory note, said deed of trust 
was executed, declaring that default in 
the payment thereof had been made and 
that the whole of said note had become 
due and had not been paid, and request- 
ing and directing the said Joseph E. Bien 
and G. Hines. as trustees, under the 
power and authority conferred upon 
them by said deed of trust, and in pur- 
suance of said application to sell said 
real property, described in said deed of 
trust and herein after described, to 
satisfy said indebtedness, the said Jo- 
seph E. Bien and G. Hines do hereby 
give notice that on Saturday, the 23rd 
day of January, 11)15, at 12 o'clock noon 
of said day, at room 718 Addison Head 
Building, 209 Post Street, in the City 
and County of San Francisco, State of 
California, they will sell at public auc- 
tion to the highest bidder for cash in 
gold coin of the United States, all that 
certain real property with the improve- 
ments thereon, situated in the County 
of Alameda, State of California, describ- 
ed as follows; to- wit: In the City of 
Oakland, 

Beginning at a point on the South 
Eastern line of 90th Avenue formerly 
Walnut or Grand Avenue, distant there- 
on North Easterly one hundred (100) 
feet from the point of intersection there- 
of with the North Eastern line of 
Orange Street; and running thence 
North Easterly along said line of 90th 
Avenue, formerly Walnut or Grand Ave- 
nue, one hundred (100) feet; thence 
South Easterly and parallel with said 
line of Orange Street one hundred and 
forty (140) feet; thence South Westerly 
and parallel with said line of 90th Ave- 
nue, formerly Walnut or Grand Avenue, 
one hundred (100) feet; and thence 
North Westerly and parallel with said 
line of Orange Street one hundred and 
forty (140) feet to the point of begin- 
ning. 

Being Lots Nos. 45 and 46, as said 
lots are delineated and so designated on 
that certain map entitled, "Map of the 
Marion Tract, Brooklyn Tp., Alameda 
Co., California, 1892," filed November 4, 
1892, in Liber 14 or Maps, page 5, in the 
office of the County Recorder of the 
County of Alameda. 

Together with all and singular the 
tenements, hereditaments and appur- 
tenances thereunto belonging or in any 
wise appertaining, and with the rever- 
sion and reversions, remainder and re- 
mainders, rents, issues and profits 
thereof. 

And, also, all the estate, right, title 
and interest, homestead or other claims 
or demands, as well in law as in 
equity, which the said Mary E. Burke 
(a widow) now has, or may hereafter 
acquire, in or to the said premises, or 
any part thereof, with the appurte- 
nances. 

Terms of Sale: Cash in gold coin of 
the United States of America; fifty per 
cent. (50 per cent.) payable to the un- 
dersigned at the fall of the hammer; 
balance upon delivery of deed, and if 
not so paid, unless for want of title (ten 
days being allowed for search) then 
said fifty per cent. (50 per cent.) to be 
forfeited and the sale to be void. Taxes 
to be prorated. Acts of sale at the pur- 
chaser's expense. 

JOSEPH E. BIEN, 
G. HINES, 

Trustees. 



18 



THE WASP 



Saturday, January 2, 1915 



N EW/PAPEgRn 
SHOP 




Sip* - 



AND THEN— THE DELUGE 

Scene: Entrance Burbank Thea- 
tre, Los Angeles. 

An express-wagon rattles up to 
the curb and stops, the horses 
straining hard to hold the wagon 
from sliding past the doorway. It 
is a heavy load. Expressman 
alights, takes off his coat as if pre- 
paring for hard job. 

"Be gorra, this is no cinch," he 
puffs, as he starts carrying the first 
armful of packages into the lobby. 
He stops at a door marked "Play- 
reading Bureau," enters and dumps 
bundles on floor. This is contin- 
ued for an hour and a half. As a 
departs he shouts to man in door- 
way: "There will be another load 
dow this afternoon." 
* This is wholly imaginary, dear 
reader— right now. But the predic- 
tion is ventured that within a few 
months it will become fact. For 
(and listen now, all ye street-car 
conductors, hod-carriers, dish-wash- 
ers and others who are sore dis- 
tressed literarily), Oliver Morosco 
has started a "Professional Play- 
Reading Bureau"!!!! 

It is said to be the first profes- 
sional play-reading bureau in the 
United States. In making his an- 
nouncement Morosco states that he 
intends to give all authors of plays 
the benefit of an honest reading. 
The following rules and guarantees 
will govern the department: First 
— All play manuscripts are to be 
plainly addressed to the Burbank 
Theatre, Los Angeles, Cal., in care 
of the Play-Reading department. 

Second— Plays will be accepted 
from all parts of the world, and all 
plays will receive like attention and 
consideration, regardless of whether 
the author is well known or is sub- 
mitting his or her first attempt at 
play-writing. 

Third— Plays from New York will 
be read and returned to the author 
within a period of three weeks from 
the time they leave their author's 
hands; from Chicago, two weeks; 
from Los Angeles, one week, and 
from other cities in time propor- 
tionate to the distance from Los 
Angeles. 

Fourth— Every play if returned 
will be accompanied by an honest, 
professional criticism. There will be 
no perfunctory notes of regret that 
fail to give the author any idea of 
the worth of his play. If acceptable 
the author will be notified at once. 
If not acceptable the manucript 
will be returned immediately with 
a criticism attached and a synopsis 
of the story to show that it has 
been read and thoroughly digested. 
This synopsis feature will also pro- 
tect authors against the possible 
confiscation of ideas. A duplicate 



of the criticism and synopsis of 
each play will be filed in the Mor- 
osco Play-Reading department, and 
if at any time in the future a play 
appears which suggests a former 
manuscript the author will have 
his synopsis at hand to adjust any 
legal tangles. 

The author is to pay the express- 
age on his manuscript to and from 
the Burbank Theatre, Los Angeles, 
Cal. While the play is in the hands 
of the play-reading department 
Oliver Morosco will have an option 
on it, this option expiring when 
the play is returned, if not accept- 
able. 

If the play is accepted for pro- 
duction 'the following conditions 
will govern. An advance royalty of 
$500 will be paid and when pro- 
duced the royalties will be as fol- 
lows: Five per cent of the gross 
weekly receipts on the first $1,500, 
7 1 /. per cent on the next $2,000, and 
10 per cent on all receipts per week 
in excess of $6,500. 

"Managers and producers of plays 
want good plays," said Mr. Morosco 
in further explanation of his 
unique plan. "By this new ar- 
rangement I expect to get good 
plays first hand. Every one will 
have an ^qual chance. Many a 
promising author has lost his op- 
portunity by his manuscript hav- 
ing been allowed to repose on a 
shelf for two or three years, only 
to be subsequently returned with- 
out a reading and with the usual 
perfunctory note of regret. I expect 
to be deluged with new plays, but 
every one will receive instant atten- 
tion, and I believe the new depart- 
ment will solve a problem that has 
been harassing play-writers for the 
past half century or more." 



Mr. Pester — If this isn't the most 
daring, outspoken play on the 
stage I'd like to see the one that is. 

Mrs. Pester — Doubtless you 
would.— Brooklyn Eagle. 



Gibb's Special 

Gibb's Special helped little 1915 
make his bow last Thursday even- 
ing and Friday morning. There was 
much celebrating and Market street 
was the center for the vast throngs 
that were out to honor the birth 
of the new year. Gibb's Special did 
its part in making the evening a 
memorable one. It seems to be the 
favorite with those who are judges 
of good liquor. 



Not Her Fault 

A little girl about 6 years old was 
visiting friends, and during the 
course of the conversation one of 
them remarked: 

"I heard you have a new little 
sister." 

"Yes," answered the little girl, 
"just two weeks old." 

"Did you want it to be a little 
girl?" asked the friend. 

"No; I wanted it to be a boy," 
she replied; "but it came while I 
was at school." — Portland Spectator. 



"What makes you such a terrible 
drinker?" 

"I was brought up on the bottle." 
— Town Topics. 



Pedro Garcia and Bonita Garcia, his 
wife, defendants. 

YOU ARE HEREBY DIRECTED to 
appear and answer the complaint in an 
action entitled as above, brought against 
you in the Superior Court of the State 
of California, in and for the City and 
County of San Francisco, within ten 
days after the service on you of this 
alias summons — if served within this 
City and County; or within thirty days 
if served elsewhere. 

And you are hereby notified that un- 
less you appear and answer as above 
required, the said Plaintiff will take 
judgment for the money or damages de- 
manded in the complaint as arising upon 
contract or will apply to the Court for 
the relief demanded in the complaint. 

GIVEN under my hand and seal of 
the Superior Court at the City and Coun- 
ty of San Francisco, State of California, 
this 5th day of December, A. D. 1914. 

H. I. MULCREVY, Clerk. 
(SEAL) By H. Brunner, 

Deputy Clerk. 



CERTIFICATE OF PARTNERSHIP UN- 
DER SECTION 2466 AND 2468 OF 
THE CIVIL CODE OF THE STATE 
OF CALIFORNIA. NO. 19SS. 



Tournament at Graneys 

Eddy Graney has arranged an in- 
teresting series of billiard tourna- 
ments this winter, the first of which 
began last Monday evening. This 
play was for the championship of 
the Pacific Coast in the three-cush- 
ion game. Four crack players en- 
tered the tournament. To the win- 
ner went a trophy and a purse of 
$500. The billiard parlors of the 
Graney establishment are admitted 
to be the best in the United State? 
west of Chicago. 




DIVIDEND NOTICES 



BANK OF HALT, Southeast corner 
Montgomery and Clay Streets; Market 
Street Branch, junction Market, Turk 
and Mason Streets — For the half year 
ending December 31, 1914, a dividend 
has been declared at the rate of four 
(4) per cent per annum on all savings 
deposits, payable on and after Saturday, 
January 2, 1915. Dividends not called 
for are added to and bear the same rate 
of interest as the principal from Janu- 
ary 1, 1915. Money deposited on or be- 
fore January 11, 1915, will earn interest 
from January 1, 1915. 
I,. SCATENA, President 

A. PEDR1NA, Cashier 



HUMBOLDT SAVINGS BANK, 783 

Market Street, near Fourth. — For the 
half year ending December 31, 1914, a 
dividend has been declared at the rate 
of four (4) per cent per annum on all 
savings deposits payable on and after 
fcatuiuay, January 2. 1915. Dividends 
not called for are added to and bear the 
same late of interest as the principal 
from January 1, 1915. 



H. C. KLEVESAHL, Cashier. 
THE GERMAN SAVINGS AND LOAN 
SOCIETT, 526 California Street, San 
Francisco; Mission Branch, corner Mis- 
sion and 21st Sts.; Richmond District 
Eranch, corner Clement St. and 7th Ave.; 
Haight Street Branch, corner Haight 
and Belvedere Sts. — For the half year 
ending December 31, 1914, a dividend lias 
been declared at the rate of four (4) per 
cent per annum on all deposits, payable 
on and after Saturday, January 2, 1915. 
Dividends not called for are added to 
the deposit account and earn dividends 
from January 1, 1915. 

GEORGE TOURNY, Manager. 



MUTUAL SAVINGS BANK OF SAN 

FRANCISCO, 706 Market Street, oppo- 
site Third. — For the half year ending 
December 31, 1914, a dividend has been 
declared at the rate of four (4) per cent 
per annum on all savings deposits, pay- 
able on and after Saturday, January 
2, 1915. Deposits not called for are 
added to and bear the same rate of in- 
terest as the principal from January 1, 
1915. 
JAMES D. FHELAN, President. 

C. B. HOBSON, Cashier. 



LEGAL NOTICES. 



SUMMONS 
IN THE SUPERIOR COURT of the 
State of California, in and for the 
City and County of San Francisco. 
EDNA M. HEIN, Plaintiff, vs. PEDRO 
GARCIA and BONITA GARCIA, his 
wife, defendant. Edward Lande, at- 
torney for plaintiff. 

No. 59413. Action brought in the Su- 
perior Court of the State of California 
in and for the City and County of San 
Francisco, and the complaint filed in the 
office of the County Clerk of said City 
and County. 

TITE PEOPLE OF THE STATE OF 
CALIFORNIA SEND GREETINGS TO: 



KNOW ALL MEN BY THESE PRE- 
SENTS: That we, the undersigned, here- 
by give notice and certify that we are 
now and have been heretofore trans- 
acting- and doing 1 business as partners 
at No. 45 Twenty-Ninth street in the 
City and County of San Francisco, State 
of California, as a partnership under the 
firm name and style of SUNSET MAR- 
BLE & GRANITE MONUMENTAL 
WORKS, and that said partnership was 
formed on the 12th day of November, 
1914, and that the name in full of said 
partnership is SUNSET MARBLE & 
GRANITE MONUMENTAL WORKS 
and the names in full of all the mem- 
bers of said partnership and their places 
of residence are as follows: 

Chares Zambruno, 469 Valley Street, 
San Francisco, Cal. 

Felice Alchieri, No. 1008 Huron Ave. 
San Francisco, Cal. 

Dated, November 12 th, 1914. 

CHARLES ZAMBRUNO 
FELICE ACHIERI 

STATE OF CALIFORIA 
City and County of San Francisco. 

On this 18th day of November, 1914, 
before me, Chas. F. Duisenberg, a Notary 
Public, in and for the said City and 
County of San Francisco, residing - there- 
in, duly commissioned and sworn, per- 
sonally appeared CHARLES ZAMBRUNO 
and FELICE ALCHIERI, known to me 
to be the persons described in and 
whose namen are subscribed to the fore- 
going- instrument, and they acknowledged 
to me that they executed the same. 

IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have 
hereunto set my hand and affixed my of- 
ficial seal at my office, in said City and 
County of San Francisco, the day and 
year in this certificate first above writ- 
ten. Chas. F. Duisenberg, 

(SEAL) 
Notary Public in and for the City and 
County of San Francisco, State of Cali- 
fornia. 
Endorsed: 

Filed Nov. 19th, 1914, H. C. Mul- 
crevy, Clerk, by Milton M. Davis, Depu- 
ty Clerk. 

Gerald C. Halsey, Attorney-at-Law, 
105 Montgomery St., San Francisco, Cal. 



NOTICE TO CREDITORS 

Estate of John Marx, deceased. 

Notice is hereby given by the under- 
signed administrator of the estate of 
John Marx, deceased, to the credit- 
ors of and all persons having claims 
against the said deceased, to exhibit 
them with the necessary vouchers with- 
in 4 months after the first publication 
of this notice to the said administrator 
at the office of M. J. Hynes, Public Ad- 
ministrator, 858 Phelan Building, San 
Francisco, California, which said office 
the undersigned selects as his place of 
business in all matters connected with 
said estate of John Marx, deceased. 

M. J. HYNES, 
Administrator of the estate of John 

Marx, deceased. 
Dated, San Francisco, October 30th, 1914. 



NOTICE TO CREDITORS 

Estate of Adolph Giacometti, deceased. 

Notice is hereby given by the under- 
signed administrator of the estate of 
Adolph Giacometti, deceased, to the cred- 
itors of and all persons having claims 
against the said deceased, to exhibit 
them with the necessary vouchers with- 
in 4 months after the first publication 
of this notice to the said administrator 
at the office of M. J. Hynes, Public Ad- 
ministrator, 858 Phelan Building, San 
Francisco, California, which said office 
the undersigned selects as his place of 
business in all matters connected with 
said estate of Adolph Giacometti, de- 
ceased. 

M. J. HYNES, 
Administrator of the estate of Adolph 

Giacometti, deceased. 
Dated, San Francisco, October 29, 1914. 






THE WASP 



LA GRANDE & WHITES 
LAUNDRY CO. 



Office and Works: 234 Twelfth St. 
Bet. Howard and Folsom Sta. 

SAN FRANCISCO. - - CALIFORNIA 
Telephone Market 916 



PHOTO FRAMING 
One of Cadanasso's Eucalyptus 
paintings can be framed by E. B. 
Courvoisier as expeditiously and 
as satisfactorily as a little Copley 
print or one of the family photo- 
graphs. Christmas stock is now 
ready for inspection, including a se- 
lect stock of framed mirrors. 43 Sut- 
ter street, between Powell and 
Stockton. 



Blake, Moffitt X To wne 

PAPER 



37-45 First Street 

TELEPHONE SUTTER 2230 
Private Kxchnnge Connecting All Depart- 
ments. 



Send for Our Select List of 

EIGHTY CALIFORNIA PAPERS 

You can insert Display 

Ads in the entire list for 

EIOHT DOLLARS AN TNCH 

Dake Advertising Agency, Inc. 



432 S. MAIN ST. 
Los Angeles 



121 SECOND ST. 
San Francisco 



SING CHONG CO. 




BEAUTIFUL 

ORIENTAL 

BAZAAR 

Large Display 

of 

Presents 

at reasonable 

Prices. 

Satisfaction 

Guaranteed 

Packing and 

Delivery Free 

GRANT AVE. and 

CALIFORNIA STREET 

CHINATOWN 



Imported Champagnes are now giving way 

to the 




Italian Swiss Colony's 

Golden State 



Extra Dry QH AMPAGNE 




Produced at 
C" Asti, California 

%y~ At Cafes, Hotels, 
Wine Dealers 



San Francisco's Restaurant de Luxe 

Adjoining the Columbia Theatre 

You do riot know this city until you have dined at FRED SOLARI'S, 
San Francisco's most palatial restaurant. World famous for its dis- 
tinctive cuisine and polite service. 

Dansants Tuesday, Thursday and 
Saturday Eveninings at 9 o'clock 

in main dining room, under direction of competent lady manager. A 
place of beauty and refinement and the right people about you. 

FRED SOLARI'S GRILL 

CORNER MASON AND GEARY STREETS 



Is age a handicap to brain workers? 
Yes and no — it depends. 

1 1 Is a handicap to be thoughl old when 
seeking b position or advancement — fail- 
tng vision «;tils attention to age. "Fumb- 
ling;" changing glasses to Bee near or 
Par attracts unfavorable aotice and sug- 
gests Inefficiency. The new "Onepiece" 
Bifocals enable you to see far and near 
witnout changing glasses — keep you in 
i In- young class because you have the 
same use of your eyes as those younger 
— then you have the advantage of long 
experience which, makes you doubly val- 
uable. The answer is age is not a han- 
dicap It you wear "Onepiece" Bifocals. 

W. D. Fennimore 1 i | / / A. R. Fennimoro 
" \J. W. Davis' >> 



mwrna 



/t?™^: 



m 



mmm 



s^r 



181 Post Street 
2508 Mission St. 

1221 Broadway, 



San Francisco 



Oakland 



1 



Headquarters 
PRACTICAL 

GIFTS 

For Men, Women, Children 



"Knit to Fit 



?? 



Sweater Coats, Underwear and 

Hosiery, Ties, Scarfs, Mufflers, 

Bath and Lounging Robes 

Knitted Specialties, Etc. 

You Know our Qualities 

A 11 Moderately Priced 




Sultan Turkish Baths 



624 POST STREET 

Special Department for Ladles 

Open Day and Night for Ladies and 
Gentlemen. 

AI. Johnson, formerly of Sutter Street 
Hammam has leased the Sultan Turkish 
Balhs, where he will be glad to see his 
old and new customers. 



PATRICK & CO. 

RUBBER STAMPS 

STENCILS 
SEALS 
BADGES 
SIGNS, ETC. 
560 Market St. San Francisco 



Healthful 



Refreshing 



Delicious 
Drink Kinsncr 

CALIFORNIA VICHY 

"Unexclled as a Bar or Table Water" 

Kinsner Mineral Springs Company 

Owners and Controllers, Willits, Cal. 

TRY A KINSNER LEMONADE 

San Francisco Office: 

12th and FOLSOII STREETS 

Phone Market 3654 



A SKIN OF BEAUTY IS A JOY 
FOREVER 

DR. T. FELIX GOURAUD'S 

ORIENTAL CREAM 

Or Magical Beautlfler 

Removes Tan. Pim- 

Ple», Frecklei Molfi- 
'tlches. Ra»h and 
Skin Di*e«M*, and 
1 every blemish on 
beauty and defies 
detection. Ithasstood 
the test of 65 yean 
no other has, and is 
ao harmless we taste 
it to be sure it is prop- 
perly made. Accept 
do counterfeit of allu- 
re '" name - The dis- 
iDpmhed Dr. L. A.Sayres said to a lady of the haul- 
on (« patient) : *'Ai you ladies will use them, I recom- 
mend Gouraud's Cream' as the least harmful of all the 
Skin preparations. " 




For Sale, by All Droggisti and F»noy 
Goods Dealarn. 

GOUEAUD'S ORIENTAL TOILET 
POWDEE 

For infanta and adults. Exquisitely 
perfumed. Relieves Skin Irritations, cures 
Sunburn and renders an excellent complex- 
ion. Price, 26 cents, by mail. 

GOUEAUD'S POUDRE SUBTILE 
Removes Superfluous Hair. Price SI, by 

Mail. 

FERD. T. HOPKINS, Prop., 87 <>reat 

Jones St., New York City. 



Established 1868. 



Goldstein & Co. 

Official Costumers 
and Wig Makers 



For all leading San Francisco and 
Coast Theatres. Private Theatri- 
cals a specialty. 



;. 883 Market Street, Lincoln Bldg-. 



* 
* 
* 
* 
* 
* 
* 
* 
* 

* 

* 
* 
* 

* 

* 
* 

* 



Paul Elder's 

Unique Book and Art Shop 

Known the world over 
among 1 cultured people for 
its harmonious beauty 
and efficient service. You 
will be cordially welcom- 
ed. 

Paul Elder and Company 

239 Grant Ave, San Francisco 



Valuable Information 

Of a Business, Personal or Social Nature 

from the Pres of the 

Pacific Coast 

ALLEN'S 

Press Clipping Bureau 

ss pirst STBcrrr 

SAN FEANC1SOO, CALIFORNIA 
Telephone Kearny 392 



Office Hour. 
9 >. m. to 5:20 p. m. 
Phone Douslu 1501 



Residence 
573 Fifth Avenue 
Hoon 6 to 7:30 
Phone P»cir 



:3U p. m. 
6c 275 



W. H. PYBURN 
NOTARY PUBLIC 



My Motto "ALWAYS IN" 
On pM"le Franco!. Se habla tlip.no 



Office: 229 Montgomery Street 
S^a Francuco California 



Illlllllllllllllllllllllllllllll 

IIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIHIIIIIBHI 




llllllllllllllllllllllllllllllll 

iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiniiiiiiii 



THE 



Feather River Canyon -Royal Gorge 

ROUTE 

eans Service 



THE 



Distinctive San Francisco Route 



TICKET OFFICES: 
665 MARKET STREET 1326 BROADWAY, OAKLAND 



Phone Sutter 1651 



Phone Oakland 132 




iiiiiiiiii iiiimiii inn ffywg » Nl11 mm 

iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiniiiiiiiiifiiiii%^rr'iii"iiiiiiiiiii minium 



Golden State Limited 

VIA LOS ANGELES 

Chicago, St. Louis, 
Kansas City 

From San Francisco, Ferry Station 
6:00 P.M. DAILY 



Southero Pacific 

The Exposition Line — 1915 — First in Safety. 



NIGHT AND DAY SERVICE 

Franklin Engraving Co. 




DESIGNERS, ILLUSTRATORS 
COLOR HALF TONE WORK 
JTONEONC ETCHING I 




11$ Columbus Avenue 
San Francisco, Cal. 

Oiir Art Department Creates Distinctive and Original Designs 
for Booklets, Newspaper Advertising and all Stationery 
of Highest Quality. 

The Photo-Engraving Department Produces Cuts in all the 
Modern Processes of Tri-color, Multi-color, Copper 
Halftones, Zinc Etchings and Embossing Dies 



|| ft — K « ^/ W w ^ft m .< <| fr— M f \/»»* i ' »V n> . »^i i nt^fitm .^K^w ^ mM ^Mi t m ll fr mt**lfr* m m»*lfrm»» * lfr m ^ /ff trn •<»/)/*[ 



Vol. LXXHL— No. 2 



SATURDAY, JANUARY 9, 1915 



Price 10 cents 





EEKLY JOURNAL j/f 
ILLUSTRATION*^ COMMENT 



ESTABLISHED ^ 1»7<3 






SAN DIEGO 
EXPOSITION 

Travel to Los Angeles by Southern Pacific, giv- 
ing choice of routes via the Coast Line or San 
Joaquin Valley 

SIX DAILY TRAINS 



San Francisco to Los Angeles 



The Coaster- 



The Owl- 



Lv. San Francisco (3rd St. Station) 7:45 a.m. 
Ar. Los Angeles 10 :55 p.m. 



Lv. San Francisco (Ferry Station). . .6:00 p.m. 
Ar. Los Angeles 8 :45 a.m. 



Valley Express- 



The Lark— 



Lv. San Francisco (Ferry Station) .. .10:40 a.m. 
Ar. Los Angeles 7 :20 a.m. 



Lv. San Francisco (3rd St. Station) 8:00 p.m. 
Ar. Los Angeles 9 :45 a.m. 



Sunset Limited- 



Sunset Express- 



Lv. San Francisco (Ferry Station)... 4:40 p.m. 
Ar. Los Angeles 7 :55 a.m. 



Lv. San Francisco (Ferry Station)... 9:00 p.m. 
Ar. Los Angeles 2 :20 p.m. 



Convenient Connection at 
Los Angeles for San Diego 

EVERY MILE PROTECTED BY 
AUTOMATIC ELECTRIC BLOCK SAFETY SIGNALS 

For Fares and Pullman Berths ask Agents 

Southern Pacific 

THE EXPOSITION LINE— FIRST IN SAFETY 



THE WAS!' 



LEADING HOTELS AND RESORTS 



Have You Dined in the 

Palace Hotel 
Court? 

Service and Cuisine Perfect 



Fairmont Under Same Management 



Palace Hotel Company 



HOTEL OAKLAND 

30 Minutes from San Francisco 
DIRECT FEBRY TO EXPOSITION GROUNDS 
Cuisine and Service Unsurpassed. Rates Reasonable. 

Under Management of Victor Reiter. 



*;**:♦*;**;**;**.*****.♦♦;♦*•*♦«♦*. 



| Special Notice 

During January we will give free a pretty wine tray with 
| cash purchases of $2.00 and over. 



T 
V 
f 

X 



I 



Kentucky Mercantile Co. 



£ Phone Sutter 4031 



488 SUTTER ST. 



King George Hotel 

MASON STREET AT GEARY 
SAN FRANCISCO 

Opposite Columbia Theatre 



In the center of the down-town shop- 
ping and theatre district 

200 rooms, all with private bath 

RATES 

1 person $1.50 per day and up 

2 persons $2.00 per day and up 

A E. McMAHON, - - Manager 







FAIRMONT HOTEL 

v 

• Recognized as the most complete and beautiful residence hotel in the 

• world. 500 rooms, every one with attached bath. 

• The Bendezvous of the discriminating 1 travelers from every land 

v Largest floor space devoted to public use of any hotel in the world. 

EUROPEAN PLAN 

• PALACE HOTEL COMPANY 

• SAN FRANCISCO 

S 1 Person $3.00 to $5.00 

Z 2 Persons $5.00 to $8.00 



Hotel St. Francis 



Turkish Baths 

Twelfth Floor for Men 
Eleventh Floor for Women 



JAMES WOODS, Manager 



JULES RESTAURANT 



v DANCING 

Every Thursday and Saturday Evenings 




Dinner with Wine $1.00 
675 MARKET STREET 



Dancing at 7 p. m. 
OPP. CHRONICLE 




Established 1853 

Monthly Contracts $1.50 per Month 

NEW WORKS JUST ERECTED AT 

27 TENTH STREET, S. P. 

Largest and Must Up-to-Date on Pacini 
Coast. Wagons call twice daily. Cleaning 
Dainty Garments Our Specialty. 



F. THOMAS PARISIAN DYEING & CLEANING WORKS 



Wellington Coal 

Best for Family Use 
For Sale by All Dealers 



<^COOOC§)0000|fe* H^OCOO&OOCOJpJ 



Western Fuel Co. 



MINERS AND SHIPPERS 



San Francisco's Fashionable Society, Play and Frolic, in The WASP 



3&WASP 

The Pacific Coast Weekly 



= AsSr"-" , \.4d&= ANOTHER MINISTER IN A MESS =* >4^ M< 



HOBSON DEFINED 

To be called a successor to Don 
Quixote, a modern John the Bap- 
tist, and a 20th century would-be 
Hercules, nil at once, is "some" 
characterization, That satiric dis- 
tinction has befallen ('apt. Rich- 
mond Pearson Hobson, he who 
would make Americans a race of 
grape-juice drinkers. 

Congressman A. J. Barchfield of 
Pennsylvania is responsible for the 
cullings from mythology and his- 
toric lore. In the course of his 
.-I ici.ii in the debate on the pro- 
posed .National Prohibition Amend- 
ment, he said: 

"The Leader of the Prohibition 
advocates in this House pretends to 
represent the religious people of 
this country as a sort of new John 
the Baptist preparing the way for 
compulsory constitutional reforma- 
tion. 

"lie preaches a doctrine of moral 
coercion in the home and inciden- 
tally advocates the construction of 
a thousand battleships for defense 
against a host of enemies who arc 
the figment of his own imagination. 
The mythical Don Quixote lias a fit- 
ting successor in the present hero 
of the Prohibitionists. Capt Hob- 
son lias travelled the Chatauqua 
routes of the country, fighting 
windmills with windy oratory, 
finding a Samurai warrior in every 
inoffensive Japanese servant in 
America, and a great destroyer in 
every bottle that decorates a Ger- 
man's dinner table. He wants to 
take upon his shoulders the task of 
Hercules and do what no mortal 
man has done, since time began. In 
his brief life he would reform the 
habits and customs which began 
with Genesis, came down through 
the history of the Sons of Abraham, 
the records of the Children of Is- 
rael and the Acts of the Apostles, 
lie is willing to reform the precepts 
of the Scripture and prohibit the 
turning of anything into wine. 
And he is determined to accom- 
plish this thing not by teaching, 
not by persuasion, not by moral de- 
formation, but by amendment of 
that greatest document in history, 
the Constitution of the United 
Sates. Capt. Hobson fails to real- 
ize, however, that his American peo- 
ple cannot be coerced, even by the 
supreme law of the land. They may 
be taught, but they cannot be 
forced." 



The Rev. Kobcrl Allen MoClaren Brown! It is a name full of high 
sounds and what-not. But as we go to press the gentleman is kicking 
his heels in jail. lie is thankful to be there, but very clerically moans 
his fate. In Hayward, if one can believe an Examiner reporter (most 
times it is out of the question), he narrowly escaped divers brick- 
bats cast by llie irreligious. We always fancied Hayward mostly 
Inhabited by Portuguese, but it seems not- With regard to jail, the 
Rev, Mr. Brown says: "I get my meals regular, I have a bed, and 
I am safe." A few days before the hurling of the brickbats he 
touched a minor chord lackadaisically as follows: "I have thought 
of suicide, but realize it is the easiest way. The burden of living 
out my life is the difficult thing." Right there we differ with the 
Rev. R.A.M.B. For him suicide would be the difficult and impossible 
thing, for he is, in all evidence, a moral and physical coward. And 
we have, moreover, the strongest belief that given a bed and "regular 
meals" no existence would be too dishonorable for him to eke out. 
The story of the Rev- R.A.M.B. reduces itself to a couple of cardinal 
points. Having taken a woman in the name of love and across the 
chasm of social ethics, lie deserts her- But before deserting 
her he gives her his revolver though perfectly aware at the time and 
previously of her melancholy and tendency toward suicide. Analysis 
of such an action points to one thing — in the subconscious mind at 
the time of giving the weapon a terribly sinister and larking idea of 
convenience. 

With the lady in the ease we have no fault to find. She truly 
loved, and with respect to love this journal is not a follower of Mrs. 
Grundy. It is the one passion which dignifies life, and it does not 
bloom often enough. It is worth all things else combined, and the 
woman thought so, and she was right. When it was over she said 
good-bye to the sun. And we are unconventional enough to add that 
in our belief site was right there as well. It was only too had that 
her passion had not found a MAN since her husband and her heart 
action could never be one. The Rev- R.A.M.B. she honored too 
highly. The fellow, it is apparent, has the souj of a lackey. If he 
had not, lie would have stood in his shoes and shot the top of his 
head off when she killed herself. If he had not he would never have 
left her, having taken her. He has acted like a cur to whom a warm 
corner and something to expand his stomach mean everything, and 
who in spite of all else can find happiness in these. And yet we hear 
of Beth Ames taking him seriously, of Theodore A. Bell coming forth 
to his saving with the eleventh commandment on his lips: "Do not 
get caught." "The only compensation I expect is his pledge to 
redeem his life," says Bell -unctuously. It just sounds like politics, 
doesn't it? 



THE CALL OF THE BAY 

Did it ever occur to you, mes- 
sieurs, that we are having a very 
great many ferry boat suicides? The 
blue waters of the Bay beckon 
many a bruised heart. A leap over 
the rail, a splash scarcely heard, 
and some soul has said "good-bye" 
to living. It is a "long way to Tip- 
perary," but a short one to the 
grave. The most terrible death is 
to die of unkindness, for lack of 
love, through loss of faith, or bo- 
cause the game was too common. 
You, who enjoy your champagne, 
make merry with your beans, or 
grin a suety appreciation, who re- 
quire nothing more than the game 
as it is played, do not forget in your 
pink-pajama happiness that there 
are finer instincts and lovelier 
themes. Your bugle-self hold not 
as a sample for the world. It may 
be hard to injure, but what do you 
play on it. What thought or tiling 
of beauty do you put forth, what in- 
fluence to make nobler or sweeter? 



Every now and then Chief of Po- 
lice White entertains with a shake- 
up in his department. We could 
suggest something better than this 
concerning a percentage of the city's 
finest, a shake-out and no come- 
back. 

And still the pawnshops are do- 
ing a cavalry business, charging fif- 
teen per cent interest and collecting 
it unmolested. 



i 




Shreve & Company 

(Established 1852) 

One of the Largest Collec- 
tions of 

ROOKWOOD POTTERY 



in the United States is now 
on display on the second 
floor. This collection in- 
cludes innumerable shapes 
and sizes in Iris, Ombroso, 
Vellum, Matt and Glaze fin- 
ishes decorated in scenic and 
floral effects. 

Post Street and Grant Avenue 
San Francisco 



v:.->:";«;..x*-X-I**X*<**X">*> , t-X**t**X**:*<' 



THE WASP 



Saturday, January 9, 1915 




INS AND OUTS OF 
THE SOCIAL WORLD 



BY GBACE TIBBITS 




You Can Never Tell 

Not in many moons has society 
been treated to so complete a sur- 
prise as the divorce suit of the Wil- 
liam Miller Grahams ot Montecito. 
Even the exclusive little coterie who 
make their home down by the old 
mission town acknowledge that the 
affair has come as a complete sur- 
prise to them, and in the mean- 
time while all of society is gasping 
and clamoring for news of the rup- 
ture, Mr. and Mrs. Graham are 
domiciled at Bellos Guardo, their 
beautiful Montecito home, seeing no 
one. 

The Grahams sprang into promi- 
nence some fifteen years ago when 
Mr. Graham came out here from 
Pennsylvania and struck it im- 
mensely rich in oil— amassing an 
enormous fortune in a very short 
time. Mrs. Graham soon followed 
him from the East and in due 
course of time they built their first 
home in Santa Barbara, where Mrs. 
Graham's beauty and wit brought 
her instantaneous popularity. 
When their old home grew too 
small for all their lavish entertain- 
ments they built "Bellos Grando" 
which completely out-shown any of 
the magnificent homes down there. 
It is situated on a bluff right over 
the ocean and is on the colonial 
type with massive white • marble 
pillars facing the sea. Here all of 
the notables who visit California 
are entertained most royally. Dukes 
and Lords, Eastern millionaires, 
and even Eleanor Glynn, the fam- 
ous author of "Three Weeks" have 
accepted the Graham's hospitality. 
Some six years ago Mrs. Graham 
and Maxine Elliott, who was an old 
friend of the Grahams, enjoyed a 
season in London together where 
the stunning Santa Barbarite re- 
ceived many attentions from the 
late King Edward, who proclaimed 
her as quite the most fascinating 
American woman he had ever met. 
The Graham's have two children, 
Earl Graham, a grown son, who is 
more often taken for Mrs. Graham's 
brother, and Geraldine, a fluffy- 
haired little daughter who is des- 
tined to become a great belle in 
years hence. 

Mrs. Graham has always been a 
patron of art and drama and in the 
last year or so she donated some 
land directly adjoining her home 
for the "Country Playhouse" 
which was to be used by a stock 
company of San Francisco and San- 
ta Barbara society folk, who could 
boast of histrionic ability. 

Mr. Graham, or Billy Graham, as 
he is always called, was one of the 
original developers of the Coalinga 
oil fields and has also extensive 
holdings in Oklahoma. 



A Disappointment 
Mrs. J. Parker Whitney, widow 



of the late millionaire mining man, 
gave her first entertainment in 
many years last week when she 
made her niece, Miss Beryl Chad- 
wick the raison d'etre for a dinner 
and theatre party. The dinner, 
which was a very elaborate affair, 
took place at the Fairmont, the 
table being adorned with yellow 
roses and wonderful corsage bou- 
quets of orchids and lilies of the 
valley being supplied each guest. 
There was quite some disappoint- 
ment however, when the guest of 
honor failed to announce her en- 
gagement as it was quite expected 
she would do, for the devoted atten- 
tions of a very eligible bachelor has 
caused much comment among the 
younger set. 

* -x- -x- -X- # 

Talented Guests 

A very interesting visitor who is 
here from New York is Miss Elsie 
de Wolfe, who is out here to assist 
the William H. Crockcrs in the com- 
pletion of their new ballroom and 
the adjoining rooms they have re- 
cently added to "New Place." 

Miss de Wolfe who has achieved 
no end of fame as an interior decor- 
ator, made her first appearance 
here when she attended the New- 
Years' Day dansant at the Fairmont 
as Mrs. Crocker's guest. Miss de 
Wolfe's stay here will not be a long 
one as she has just opened up a 
new dancing house in New York 
on the top of one of the theatres, 
which she calls "Castles in the Air." 
The Vernon Castles without whom 
no Gotham affair is a success, are in 
charge of it and it promises to be- 
come quite as popular as the Sastle 
House". 

Mrs. Edgar de Wolfe, who is Elsie 
de Wolfe's sister-in-law, has recently 
covered herself with glory in the 
furnishing of "The Oaks" the won- 
derful new home of the Fred Kohls 
in the hills back of Easton. Mrs. 
de Wolfe spent six months in Eu- 
rope collecting material for the dec- 
orations and the music room in the 
Kohl mansion is proclaimed quite 
the most beautiful of its kind on 
the coast. 



A Daily Mistake 
The Schwerin ball, the pros and 
cons of which are still being dis- 
cussed, was sadly lacking in one re- 
spect which was nothing more or 
less than the absence of its charm- 
ing hostess, Mrs. Rennie Pierre 
Schwerin. The various dailies gave 
an elaborate description of the 
gown Mrs. Schwerin wore and how 
she looked, when in reality she was 
reposing in a flower bedecked sick 
room at Adler's sanitarium. She 
had been ill for a couple of days 
preceding the ball and of course, ex- 
pected to be able to preside over it 
when at the last minute her condi- 
tion was worse and she was forced 



to forego it. One of the most win- 
some figures at the ball was dainty 
little Mrs. Caroline Mills Fletcher, 
who wore a Dolly Varden brocade 
of yellow, with bright flowers 
strewn over it. It was made with 
a skirt waist and very full short cir- 
cular skirt. The fair Caroline, who 
has the features of a cameo and a 
real peaches and cream complexion, 
is a great belle in the "Burlingame" 
set where her cousin, Mrs. Walter 
Hobart, is an interesting hostess. 

-x- * * * * 

A Pretty Romance 

An extremely surprising bit of 
news, which has just reached us, 
is the marriage which took place 
the day before Christmas, of Lloyd 
Osbourne, the author, to Miss Ethel 
Head of Gilroy. The friendship of 
Osbourne and Miss Head dates 
back several years to the time 
of a very serious illness of 
Mrs. Robert Luois Stevenson, 
Osborune's mother. Miss Head, 
it seems, was a trained-nurse, 
the graduate of a training school 
for nurses in a Gilroy private hos- 
pital. Mrs. Stevenson, who owned 
a beautiful mountain ranch back 
of Gilroy sent for Miss Head when 
taken ill at her mountain retreat. 
From this incident a deep friend- 
ship sprang up between the two 
and after that Miss Head was fre- 
quently a guest at "Stonehedge," 
the Stevenson home at Monticelo. 
And when she died, Mrs. Stevenson 
bequeathed her Gilroy ranch to the 
pretty nurse. Mr. Osbourne has 
been divorced for several years from 



his first wife, who was Miss Kath- 
arine Durham, and who has fre- 
quently been before the public eye 
in attempting to prevent the sale 
of the Stevenson letters and papers. 
Osborne is a brother of Mrs. Ed- 
ward Field, who until a few months 
ago was Mrs. Isabel Strong, and 
who married the late Mrs. Steven- 
son's secretary. Osbourne and 
Mrs. Field both inherited a large 
fortune from their mother, who is 
said to have left nearly a million 
dollars. Mr. and Mrs. Osbourne in- 
tend coming to California next 
month. 

-X- -X- -X- * -X- 

Another Surprise 

Eastbay society is very much in- 
terested in the news of the impend- 
ing divorce of the young Anthony 
Caminettis, whose domestic affairs 
were considered to be quite happy 
and serene. But Mrs. Caminctti, 
who was handsome Ruth Hall, be- 
fore her marriage to the son of the 
Commissioner-General of Immigra- 
tion, has already filed suit on the 
grounds of extreme cruelty. The 
Caminettis have been married just 
three years and Mrs. Caminetti al- 
leges that life seemed like one long 
drawn out honeymoon until last 
September when her husband's 
manner to her underwent a change. 
Mrs. Caminctti is the second daugh- 
ter of Mrs. Samuel P. Hall and the 
late Chief Justice Hall of Oakland, 
and she is a sister of Whipple Hall, 
Dr. Channing Hall, Chaffee Hall, 
Priscilla Hall and Alice Hall. 
Young Caminetti is a brother of 




Coats 

One hundred of the season's smart- 
est styles. Of every material, color 
and model. Suitable for every oc- 
casion, and all of them very low 
price. Come this week and examine 
our stock. 

Style B - $ 9.75 
Style A ■ $19.75 
Style C - $14.75 



Gould- Sullivan 

Cloak and Suit Co. 

882 Market Street, Opposite Emporium 
Open Saturday evenings till 10 p. m. 



Saturday, January 9, 1915. 



THE \\ \--r 



Caminetti, who was recently 
feonvictcd under the Mann White 
Slave Act. 



Jl -r. I 



Back Home Again 
Everyone is delighted to hear 
that Ensign and Mrs. Valentine 
u ood an soon to be stationed at 
Mare island, and Mrs. Wood's San 
Prancisep friends will have an op- 
portunity of greeting her as a 

young matron. Mrs, Wood 

jyas a Miss Grace Dudley ol New 
STork, before her marriage. She is 
the daughter of -Mrs. A. Palmer 
Dudley and a granddaughter of 

Mis. William S. Adams of MenlO 
l'ark. Mrs. Dudley and her two 
rounger daughters left San Fran- 
Msco to make New York their home 
Several years ago and since then 
have only returned for an occasion- 
al I Nit. Mrs. Wood is a sister of 

beautiful titian-haired Janey Dud- 
ley, w ho Is now Mrs. Louis Tainter 

Ol Ivlhain Manor, and she IS a half 
sister of Mrs. Oliver Kehrlein of 
Menlo Park, who was Miss Francis 
Coon before her marriage. 
* * * * 
Society is very much interested in 
the news of the engagement of Miss 
Helen Goodicr to John Caleb Hea- 
der ol San Diego. The Pair Helen, 
who is a very striking looking maid, 
tall and slender, with vivid brun- 
ette coloring, is the daughter of 
Colonel and Mrs. Lewis GrOOldier. 
JDolonel Goodier has been stationed 
in San Francisco for the past two 
years, and .Miss Helen has been a 
great belle in both army and 
Civilian circles. Shortly after the 
Goodiers' arrival here from the 
East Miss Helen announced her en- 
gagement to Lieutenant Martin Pet- 
erson. V. S. >,'.. who was stationed 
on the South Dakota. Numerous 
affairs were given in their honor, 
when all of a sudden the engage- 
ment was broken and the charm- 
ing Helen was no longer seen about 
With the handsome son of Neptune. 
Mr. Hendee resides in San Diego. 
where he met his pretty fiance,' who 
came down there to visit her broth- 
er. Lieutenant Lewis Edward Goo- ■ 
dier, U. S. A., one of our most suc- 
eessful army airmen. The wedding 
is to take place in the early spring, 
after which the young couple will 
make their home in the southland. 

% ■;:■ % # * 

The news that the handsome 
Anne Peters has been chosen queen 
of the Mardi Rras of 1015 docs not 
surprise anyone very much, for it 
was generally known last year that 
the dashing Anne was quite serious- 
ly considered before the honor was 
bestowed upon Mrs. Edgar Piexot- 
to. Enid Gregg was always suggest- 
ed, and it was finally decided to 
award it one more year to a young 
matron. 

Anne Peters is the youngest 
daughter of Mrs. J. D. Peters of 
Stockton, and is a great heiress in 
her own right. She is a tall, slender 
demi-blonde, with rich coloring and 
quite unusually expressive eyes. 
Ever since her debut some seven or 



eight year- ago she has been on the 
top wave of popularity and it is 
Said that more suitors have wor- 
shiped at her shrine than any other 

maid in society. Truth is that 
she can count scalps well into the 
thirties but still prefers to remain 
single. However, there are most per- 
sistent rumors that a very eligible 

son of Neptune, who originally 
hails from Dixie, has about per- 
suaded In')' to don the golden band. 
The ball is to to be held as last 

year, in the Sun Court of the Palace 
Hotel, and everyone is waiting with 
abated breath to hear what the 
decorative scheme 1 is to be this year. 
Last year it was East Indian. Mrs. 
Piexotto stepping out of a Hindu 
temple. The year before it was 
Roman, stunning fair-haired Mrs. 
eh niToi.il), Mrs. Eugene De Sablas' 

daughter, being Cleopatra, while 
Ferdinand Sheriott was Marc An- 
tony, and the year before that it 
represented an Empire Court with 
Mis. Fred Kohl as Empress Jo- 
sephine and Thornwell Mullally, a 
very overgrown Napoleon. It will. 
of course, be left to Queen Anne to 
choose her own consort and each 
of that lady's numerous beaux are 
consequently sure of receiving the 
honor. 

tt -x- * # 

After only a day of marital free- 
dom. Charles A. Warren, millionaire 
contractor and club man, has once 
more donned the yoke of domestic- 
ity. This time Warren's partner is 
Mrs. Conine Lindstrom Baker, the 
pretty fair-haired ex-wife of Charles 
Baker of this city. The affair dates 
back years and years, for Warren 
and Mrs. Baker were ifriends 'in 
grammar school days, only the fair 
Corrine was always the acknowl- 
edged sweetheart of Baker. So when 
all three grew up and Baker and 
Miss Lindstrom were married, and 
as Warren had married Claudine 
Colton, the handsome daughter of 
the late Judge Aylett R. Colton, the 
foursome were the closest of friends. 
All seemed most congenial and hap- 
py until it became apparent that 
Warren and Mrs. Baker were not 
"playing the game" but were in 
real earnest. First the Bakers were 
divorced, Mrs. Baker getting her 
final decree last July, and then 
came 'the Warren divorce, which 
was only made final on the second 
day of this year. Mrs. Claudine 
Warren was granted the custody 
of the two Warren children and is 
now living in the southern part of 
the State with them, while Mrs. 
Corrine Warren's little daughter 
will make her home with her moth- 
er and step-father at the Warren 
ranch, near Warm Springs. War- 
ern is the vice-president of the San 
Jose Terminal Railroad Company, 
and inherited a large fortune from 
his father. He is a member of the 
Bohemian, Olympic, University and 
Indoor Yacht Clubs. 

The first wedding of the new 
year was that of handsome Miss 
jane Hotaling to Alfred Swinerton, 
which took place on Thursday even- 



ing of this week at the home of the 
bride's mother, Mrs. A. P. Hotaling. 
on Franklin St. and was witnessed 

by a couple of hundred friends and 

relative-. Miss Viola Page, a Chicago 
maid and Miss llotaliug's dearest 
friend, was the maid-of-honor. and 
Mrs. Sylvia Friadenhall of Seattle, 
an aunt of tin' bride, was the ma- 
tron of honor. George de Song was 
Mr. Swincrton's best man and the 
ushers were George Hotaling and 
Douglas Pry. .Miss Hotaling, who 
is a large and athletic and a typi- 
cal Western girl, is one of the most 
popular girls in society, and has a 
host of admirers who have been 
nursing very wounded feelings ever 
since her engagement to young 
Swinerton was announced. After 
the honeymoon, which is to be 
spent in the South, the young cou- 
ple will reside here. 

Quite the most elaborate New 
Year's eve party was the cabaret 

(Continued on page 13) 

MRS. SARAH CECILIA CRANE 

Emmanuel Practitioner 

Hours 10 to 4 

1452 Divisadero St., near Geary St. 

Phone Fillmore 3929 



To vi.-it San Francisco without sco- 
ing A. Andrews' Diamond Palace would 
bo like 1 1 iting Europo wil bout - 
Paris. It is a leading feature of San 
Franoisco, a marvel of beauty and ele- 
, ami i- unquestionably the most 
magnificent jewelry store in the world. 
Visitors ami residents are cordially in- 
vited to examine the marvels of genius 

at :10 Kearny Street. 10-talilished 1 S.jl.l. 

Open S a. in. to 5:30 p. in. 



Phone Kearny 2578 



FOR EXCLUSIVE CUSTOM MADE 
SUITS AND GOWNS 

1SS POST STREET SAN FRANCISCO 



Phone Franklin 5062 



MRS. F. 



OD 



Formerly F. Gerard of New York 

$ o w n s and blouses 

For Sale and Made to Order 

476 OTARRELL STREET 

SAN FRANCISCO 



i 




1 PAREhTS.ATTENTION! j 

* 1 

((? IN selecting a Business College m 

js Jj to which to send yoar hoys o 

(J? or girls, you should rcmem- <S 

v ber that practically all the expert §* 

(S short-hand reporters of the State (5 

# advise you that Gallagher -Marsh ■& 

i§ Short-Hand System is the best, 3? 

•g and you should therefore send jL 

<k them to & 

I Gallagher- Marsh 1 

I Business College I 

§ 1256 MARKET STREET K 

£ which specializes on Short-Hand, £L 

£k Typing and Eook-Keeping. Day « 

(j and Evening Classes. & 



HEALEfS"™ 



RUSSIAN IMPERIAL 
SCHOOL OF DANCING 

VERONINE VESTOFF 
(Late associate of Pavlowa) 

The Imperial Russian 
Ballet School Maintained 
by the Czar of Russia for 
training children to dance, 
is famous throughout the 
world for having brought 
the art of dancing to a 
point of perfection not ap- 
proached in any other 
country. 

Veronine Vestofi is the 
only accredited representa- 
tive of this school in the 
United States. 
Chateau Bohlig — Pine and 
Powell Sts., San "Francisco, Cal. 



COLLEGE 



1215 Van Ness Avenue 
SAN FRANCISCO 



16th & San Pablo Ave. 
OAKLAND 



PUCKETT'S 
College of Dancing 

ASSEMBLY HALL, 1268 SUTTEE 
CLASSES: 

Beginners' Classes Mondays 

Classes and Socials .... Wednesdays 

TANGO CLASSES Thursdays 

Assemblies Fridays 

FOR PEIVATE LESSONS 
PHONE FRANKLIN 118 



THE KIEIAW STUDIOS 
OF MODERN DANCES 

Miss Claribel Kirby announces Mr. 
Gilbert Littlejohn has joined the teach- 
ing forces of this instituion. Private 
lessons or class instruction by appoint- 
ment only. Tea and refreshments if 
desired. 

435 Powell Street, 

Third Floor 

Telephone Sutter 2105 

Instructions given with improved 

methods — Fox Trot, Lulu Fado, One 

Step, Hesitation, Tango, Maxixe and all 

the new dances. 



A. MAHR B. MIECZKOWSK1 

Graduates of the Imperial School 

Russian Dancing School 

Imperial Method Taught 



1509 Gough Street, S. 

Telephone West 493S 



F. 



THE WASP 



Saturday, January 9, 1915 



cT&WASP 

The Pacific Coast Weekly 



Published weekly by 

THE WASP PUBLISHING COMPANY (Inc.) 

49 GEARY ST., SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 
Phone, Douglas 1S71 

MARTIAL DAVOUST Managing Editor 

PAUL GWYNNE Editor 

GLENN H. JOHNSON - Associate Editor 

GERALD C. HALSEY Attorney 

SUBSCRIPTION-^IrT the Um?eT*States, (Janada7~a"'~d Mexico, $5 a™yeaT'in"advancer 
Entered at the San Francisco Postoffice as second-class matter. 



The Wasp will gladly publish notices of social events and other 
items of interest to its readers. Manuscripts should be at this office 
not later than Wednesday morning of the week's issue. 



EVEN IP YOU overlooked the local poor before Christmas, there 
is still time. They are still with us, you know. 



GENTLEMEN, BEWARE— Judge Sturtevant has ruled that your 
wives have a perfect right to sit on other men's laps, provided it 
leads to no "further indiscretions." 



WE HEAR SO MUCH about the unemployed these days, but never 
a word about assisting the poor artist. Yet a lot of the boys are 
playing so close this weather, they do not know quite how it will 
come out. 



LET US SEE, is there any race-relationship between the Siamese 
and the Russians? We have with us, for instance, Prince Kamjeng- 
petch. It sounds like a distant echo of Stephanovieh, Micliaelovitch, 
or Somethingovitch. 



A PLACE ON the State Railroad Commission is accepted by Frank 
R. Devlin of Vallejo "at a sacrifice". Too bad! There were several 
candidates languishing about for the position who didn't talk about 
sacrificing a thing. Why not have given these a chance? 



IDAHO HAS elected an orthodox Jew as governor. His name is 
Moses Alexander and he is president of the only Jewish congre- 
gation in the state. Our hats off to Idaho as a really tolerant com- 
monwealth, for this is the first time in the history of the country 
that such an honor has been accorder an Israelite. 



WE KNEW THERE was truth in that phrase about some women 
driving men to drink. A male suitor for freedom from marital ties 
the other day asserted his wife allowed him five cents for lunch. He 
must perforce get it "free" at a thirst emporium, with a glass of beer. 

****** 

IT IS A SAFE wager that the probable attendance of President 
Wilson and Admiral Dewey at the Army Relief Ball in March will 
do a tremendous lot to stimulate interest in that affair. Think of 
the chance of seeing Woodrow essaying the "Watchful Wait Waltz" 
and the Admiral taking a fling at the "Midshipman Maxixe." Who 
would miss it? 




Treasury Modifies Tax Decision 

Interest paid on mortgage indebt- 
edness on real estate acquired by 
corporations could be deducted 
prior to July 14, 1913, from income 
tax returns of corporations under 
the excise tax law, now incorporat- 
ed in the Federal income tax law, 
providing the mortgage remained a 
lien upon the property and the 
debt was not assumed by the cor- 
poration. This ruling was then 
superseded by a Treasury decision 
in which it was held that indebted- 
ness secured by mortgage upon 
property to which the corporation 
has taken or is taking title, or in 
which it has an equity, is the in- 
debtedness of the corporation, and 
that interest payments on such in- 
debtedness cannot be deducted ex- 
cept to the extent that the whole 
amount ot interest paid upon bond- 
ed or other indebtedness does not 
exceed an amount paid upon a sum 
not in excess of the paid-up capital 
stock outstanding at the close of 
the year. 

This latter ruling has worked in- 
justice to real estate owners, who 
were not only required to pay the 
income tax, but also interest upon 
mortgage indebtedness. It received 
the careful attention of the law and 
legislative committee of the advis- 
ory council of real estate interests, 
Walter Lindner, chairman, and the 
advisory council is now able to an- 
nounce that the injustice of the de- 
cision has been remedied by the 
Treasury Department, under date 
of Dec. 14. Under the heading with 
reference to rulings in relation to 
corporation income tax, is the fol- 
lowing: 

As used in the act the expression 
"collateral the subject of sale, &c, 
refers to' physical or tangible prop- 
erty bound for the performance of 
certain covenants or payments of 
certain obligations, and which 
physical or tangible property is the 
"subject of sale in the ordinary bus- 
iness of a corporation" owning the 
same. Where such corporation is, 
as a matter of its ordinary busi- 
ness engaged in buying and selling, 
or dealing in such property, the in- 
terest actually paid within the year 
on indebtedness wholly secured by 
such collateral may be allowably de- 
ducted from gross income as ex- 
pense of doing business, without re- 
gard to the limit of deductible in- 
terest as otherwise provided by the 
statute. The corporation, &c, must 
be organized and operated for the 
purpose of buying, selling, and 
dealing in the particular kind of 
property which becomes collateral 
in question, and the particular 
kind of property pledged for the 
debt upon which the interest is 
paid must be the "subject of sale in 
the ordinary business of the corpor- 
ation." Real estate mortgaged, and 
the property of corporations organ- 
ized for and engaged in the busi- 
ness of buying, selling, and dealing 
in real estate: warehouse receipts 
representing property the subject of 
sale in the ordinary business of the 
corporation owning the same, and 



which warehouse receipts are pledg- 
ed as collateral for such corpora- 
tion's own debt, are examples where 
the interest paid will be deductible 
as a "business expense" and not bo 
subject to the statutory limitation 
as to interest deduction. 



Fine Points for the Would be Ex- 
pert in Auction Bridge 
By Florence Irwin 

In America the game of auction is 
made and regulated by the mass of 
intelligent players. They try each 
proposed innovation and establish 
or discard it. Nothing can stop 
them from adopting a thing they 
like; nothnng can force them to ac- 
cept one they dislike. 

The card clubs are generally the 
last to fall into line when an im- 
portant change is made. They 
adopt an innovation when it is im- 
possible longer to refrain. Witness 
the new count, which was almost 
unversally played under the noses 
of the clubs before it was officially 
recognized by them. Being import- 
ant, being in the limelight, they 
are necessarily ultra-conservative. 
Admittedly, they make no changes 
until those changes become forced 
upon them; they accept no innova- 
tion till it has been tried and stand- 
ardized. Who then is to "try" it 
and "standardize" it, if not the 
players ^at large? 

You have heard of the "Butter- 
Scotchmen," who couldn't run till 
they got hot, ((being butter- 
scotch,) and couldn't get hot till 
they ran, (being Scotchmen:) we 
would find ourselves in the same 
dilemma if the card clubs waited 
for the players at large and the 
players waited for the clubs, before 
a thing could be standardized. 

The clubs make no pretensions to- 
ward regulating the game for any 
but their own members. They are 
willing to decide questions that are 
referred to them but if they arro- 
gate-to themselves no universal au- 
thority. Even different clubs play 
differently. I know of no American 
club that has officially adopted the 
privilege of the opening pass and 
the new slam values. Yet both are 
used by nearly all players in all sec- 
tions of the country. 

In England it is quite otherwise. 
The clubs make the game and the 
players accept it. There is an occa- 
sional exception, as in the case of 
the new count, which was used in 
almost all private houses before the 
clubs would take it up. But in 
nearly all cases the clubs make the 
game for the players. And there is 
an excellent reason for this. Eng- 
land is a much smaller country 
than America. Nevertheless, when 
card rules are to be altered or card 
changes discussed, no one club un- 
dertakes to do it. Delegates are ap- 
pointed from all the important 
clubs, and they decide all questions. 
When the rules finally appear they 
are joint rules, and every one is, 
naturally, satisfied with them. 

I would give anything if this sys- 
tem eould be adopted here; if once 



Saturday, January 9, 1915. 



THE WASP 



in three or (our years there could 
be a great national congress to dc- 
clde mooted questions and to regu 
late the laws. Tin's should be held 
Brat in one city, then in another. 
All changes should i>e voted on at 
Its sittings; if accepted they should 
be universally established; if 
downed they should either be per- 
manently killed or held over till the 
next session, the game in the mean- 
time proceeding without them. The 
concensus ol opinion ol the players 
id large eoiilil he obtained definitely 
on all subjects. And there should 
be a standing hoard of arbitration 
for the decision of all questions of 
etiquette. 

Failing this, we shall never have a 

universal standard Americans arc 

self-reliant and experimental by nat- 
ure. They like short Governments 
and a large voice in the making of 
those Governments. They want 
land properly] a finger in every 
Important pie that they arc to be 
forced to swallow. And they know 
very well that all the brains and 
acumen in the country arc not cen- 
tered in any one city. 

Why should New York regulate 
the game of auction for Chicago? 
"Why should San Francisco tell 
Washington how to play? What 
ahout all the other places that have 
their experts and their ideas? Fail- 
ing a national congress, we arc 
forced to one of two things— local- 
isms, or one small club in one city 
dictating the methods for universal 
adoption. We choose, very proper- 
ly, localisms as the lesser of the two 
evils. In the matter of the etiquette 
alone we are obliged to accept a 
universal standard; and, even here, 
there is dissatisfaction. 

I have never yet seen a person 
who liked the new revoke laws. 
Three tricks (150 points) for one 
side and 100 points for the other 
does not appeal to the American 
sense of fair play. Given a congress, 
I know that would be knocked end- 
wise in the first session. I am ab- 
solutely sure that nullos would be 
officrrally adopted as an insepar- 
able part ot the game, like no- 
trumps; and I think there would 
be a very hot argument against the 
present official fashion of scoring in 
three-handed auction. This is so 
much disliked that half the players 
I know refuse to countenance it. 

Let me take an example that I 
have already mentioned twice. Three 
men are playing auction, and at the 
end of the evening they stand thus: 
A, 1,100; B, 800; C, 400. Now, ac- 
cording to the standard laws, A 
wins 700 points from C and 300 
from B, while B wins 400 from C. 
Anyone with half an eye can see 
that this is excessive winning and 
excessive losing. It A wins from two 
men and B from one, that makes 
three losers represented. And if C 
loses to two men and B to one, 
that makes three winners. Three 
losers and three winners— six men— 
in a three-handed game. How does 
that strike you? 

I know men who so decry this sys- 



tem that they refuse to play in a 
three-handed game. And 1 know 
others who insist on tin- fairer 

method of scoring in the teeth of 

the laws. The lairer method is the 

proportionate one. Add tin- ltc-s 

scores (1,100 plus SIX) plus Hill equals 
'-'." and divide that sum by •'!. 

(766 plus;) measure that last figure 

against each man's score and let 
him win, or lose, the difference. 
In this way there are hut three 

players represented. There may he 

one winner and two losers or one 
loser and two winners, or one man 
may stand pat and there may he 
one winner and one loser. But 
there are lint three players— not six 
—in a three-handed game. 



THE BOOST BUSINESS 

"Men speak much too often. A 
glance of the eye, Reginald, a 
glance of the eye." 

The Panama-California Exposi- 
tion at San Diego is humming. The 
San Diego papers talk of a raid of 
twenty thousand on the familiar 
pay-as-you-enter turnstile Sunday. 
This is all very well, and we rather 
like San Diego, but why should 
John W. Barrett of the Pan-Ameri- 
can Union get off stuff like this: 
"It is the finest thing I have ever 
seen assembled and I have seen 
every exposition in this country." 
Undoubtedly it is a very fine thing, 
but this everlasting praising in the 
superlative always reminds us of 
the fat lady in the circus. Not of 
anything the fat lady may say, un- 
derstand, but just of the fat lady 
herself, which is ample. Poor John! 
Ho is a rather fine fellow and can- 
not help it. It is a way of being 
on to his job. It is the kind of 
palaver the people want, or do they 
want it, that is, really? Isn't it pos- 
sible they have grown tired of this 
boost stuff and indiscriminate 
orange provided so regularly and 
without change? Do not qualities 
speak for themselves any more and 
does not too much speaking of 
them drive real qualidities away? 
Even in this city, is this not true? 
Does not the vulgar bray of a cer- 
tain inhabitant of the desert min- 
gle a little in the noise wo make? 
The old San Francisco, which was 
the best beloved on earth, knew no 
such trait, but sat serene, indiffer- 
ent, and magnificent. But it would 
seem that wo have lost our spirit of 
the aristocratic and gone selling pa- 
pers with the newsboys— Yes! 



Mr. Nat Goodwin, playing in Illin- 
ois, is ill? He went on the stage at 
a temperature of 103. We have seen 
him off the stage frequently with 
his temperature higher than that. 
Wasn't it Nat who wrote the mod- 
est story of why the women adored 
him? An examination of his head 
might show a feminine abcess. Yet, 
after all, ho has really done some 
good in the world. He has helped 
to keep matrimony popular. 



THE UNHAPPY LADY 

By Paul Gwynne 

I have the honor of knowing a 
lady who owns a limousine. [ put 

it that way because a limousine 
describes her. Her poise is limous- 
ine. She is ahout thirty-live, if one 
dare guess a woman's age, and has 
been a widow two years. She has 
many friends, or acquaintonces, a 
thousand invitations to go out. 
This is all agreeable to her because 
freedom is her point of view. Yet 
when you praise life to her she 
shrugs her shoulders. 

I bowed to her on the street the 
other day while she was taking 
leave of another lady. This lady 
was tall and slender, with the sun- 
light caught in her hair, and some- 
thing brooding and lovely in her 
face. I had only a glimpse of her 
however. For my friend left her 
and I paused to pay my respects. 
"I want you to come and see a pict- 
ure I bought," she said. "It is some- 
thing new in oil. I would like to 
have your opinion." 

"Oh, very well," I agreed. In the 
limousine she began to tell me 

about Mrs. X , the woman to 

whom she had been speaking. 
"Poor Helen," she said, "she married 
unfortunately. A newspaper man— 
and she was so pretty! She is ex- 
tremely pretty now. He is a good 
fellow, of course, thinks the world 
of her, but he has nothing except 
his salary. And they have a child — 
just think of it. Wherever they go 
they have to cadge the child with 
them. Helen, the poor thing, is 
simply done for. I never speak to 
her of it because she does not seem 
to see it that way, or, perhaps, wont 
let herself. But one never sees her 
out any more; I mean, in places 
that count. She is buried unless 
she gets a divorce and finds some- 
one who really can spend money on 
her and make her happy." 

"Yet she does not appear dowdy," 
I suggested. 

"No; she dresses exquisitely — al- 
ways did; makes most ot her own 
dresses, I imagine." 

A week later I happened to call 
on an artist friend, somewhat cele- 
brated. It was my first visit to his 
studio, though we had long been 
friends. I looked at his pictures 
then from his window out on a 
lawn bordered with nodding 
roses where a young woman 
and a little boy made happy 
throatings playing with a ball. 
The little boy was possibly 
not yet four. He was handsome, 
rosy-cheeked, and laughing. Even 
his pink legs seemed to laugh. Ev- 
ery now and then the woman drew 
her to him and kissed him, rolled 
him, and kissed him again. It was 
a pretty sight. The sun, itself, joy- 
ed in it, made a thousand glowing 
tints in the woman's brown hair, 
brought out the wonderful tender- 
ness of her eyes, the soft beauty of 
her mouth, the indescribable charm 
about her which reminded one of 



the nodding, brooding roses and 
was simply motherhood. 

My friend, who is more than forty. 
eame to my elbOW. "Some day," he 
said, "when I am a better artist 
than I am, I may he able to paint 
that picture. I shall call it "Happi- 
ness. 1 I have watched them here 
day after day. Sometimes the 
young husband joins the party. 
They arc wonderfully in love with 
each other, or merely in love with 
each other ,as you choose to put it. 
The child is a little God Pan. They 
live in the flat below. About a 
month ago I had dinner with them. 
Such happiness! One rarely sees it 
these days. People don't go after it 
right." His Paris-trained hand 
swept the city and its tinsel crav- 
ings back to the glowing opal of 
the bay and his paint-stained fin- 
gers lingered pointing on the scene 
below. "That is the real joy of liv- 
ing and the woman knows it." 

'What are their names?" I asked, 
something familiar in her appear- 
ance growing on me. 

He told mo. It was the woman of 
whom the lady in the limousine 
had spoken. 



Lord Wimborne, who has been 
appointed Lord Lieutenant of Ire- 
land, succeeding Lord Aberdeen, is 
known by several of the bon-ton of 
this city. He is the man who lifted 
the polo cup last year in New York. 
It is rumored that at that time 
something of a romance developed 
between he and a former San Fran- 
cisco girl who is now resident in 
the East, and who saw a great 
deal of him during his visit. At 
any rate, we can speak for the lady. 
One never knows about an English- 
man. Wasn't it Eleanor Sears who 
accused them of having silk man- 
ners? But they have a reputation 
for being true, and this Lord, it 
seems, forgot not for a moment the 
blue eyes of England while he smil- 
ed a little at lotus-eyed, fair- 
haired America. 



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Goldstein & Co. 

Official Costumers 
and Wig Makers 






For all leading- San Francisco and 4» 

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PATRONIZE 




Store 1, Cor. Sutter and Devisadero Streets 

Store 2, Cor. Haight St. and Masonic Ave. 

Store 3, Cor Sacramento St. and Presidio 

Ave. 

Store 4, 84 Post Street, east of Kearny 

Store 5, Cor. Carl and Cole Streets 

Store 6, Cor. Union and Steiner Streets 

Store 7, Cor. Powell and Sutter Streets 



THE WASP 



Saturday, January 9, 1915 



cT&WASP 

The Pacific Coast Weekly 



Published weekly by 

THE WASP PUBLISHING COMPANY (Inc.) 

49 CtEAKT ST., SAN PEAHCISCO, CAI. 
Phone, Douglas 1871 

MARTIAN DAVOUST - - - - - Managing Editor 

PAUL GWYNNE Editor 

GLENN H. JOHNSON Associate Editor 

GERALD C, HALSEY Attorney 

SUBSCRIPTION— fn~" the" TjmTed 3 "^ tales. Cai'iadl".'''^^'^'"^!^! "s^'V year in advance 3 
Entered at the San Francisco Postoffice as second-class matter. 



The "Wasp will gladly publish notices of social events and other 
items of interest to its readers. Manuscripts should be at this office 
not later than "Wednesday morning of the week's issue. 



EVEN IF YOU overlooked the local poor before Christmas, there 
is still time. They are still with us, you know. 



GENTLEMEN, BEWARE— Judge Sturtevant has ruled that your 
wives have a perfect right to sit on other men's laps, provided it 
leads to no "further indiscretions." 



WE HEAR SO MUCH about the unemployed these days, but never 
a word about assisting the poor artist. Yet a lot of the boys are 
playing so close this weather, they do not know quite how it will 
come out. 



LET US SEE, is there any race-relationship between the Siamese 
and the Russians? We have with us, for instance, Prince Kamjeng- 
petch. It sounds like a distant echo of Stephanovich, Michaelovitch, 
or Somethingovitch. 



A PLACE ON the State Railroad Commission is accepted by Frank 
R. Devlin of Vallejo " at a sacrifice ' '. Too bad ! There were several 
candidates languishing about for the position who didn't talk about 
sacrificing a thing. Why not have given these a chance? 



IDAHO HAS elected an orthodox Jew as governor. His name is 
Moses Alexander and he is president of the only Jewish congre- 
gation in the state. Our hats off to Idaho as a really tolerant com- 
monwealth, for this is the first time in the history of the country 
that such an honor has been accorder an Israelite. 



WE KNEW THERE was truth in that phrase about some women 
driving men to drink. A male suitor for freedom from marital ties 
the other day asserted his wife allowed him five cents for lunch. He 
must perforce get it "free" at a thirst emporium, with a glass of beer. 



IT IS A SAFE wager that the probable attendance of President 
Wilson and Admiral Dewey at the Army Relief Ball in March will 
do a tremendous lot to stimulate interest in that affair. Think of 
the chance of seeing Woodrow essaying the "Watchful Wait Waltz" 
and the Admiral taking a fling at the "Midshipman Maxixe." Who 
would miss it? 




Treasury Modifies Tax Decision 

Interest paid on mortgage indebt- 
edness on real estate acquired by 
corporations could be deducted 
prior to July 14, 1913, from income 
tax returns of corporations under 
the excise tax law, now incorporat- 
ed in the Federal income tax law, 
providing the mortgage remained a 
lien upon the property and the 
debt was not assumed by the cor- 
poration. This ruling was then 
superseded by a Treasury decision 
in which it was held that indebted- 
ness secured by mortgage upon 
property to which the corporation 
has taken or is taking title, or in 
which it has an equity, is the in- 
debtedness of the corporation, and 
that interest payments on such in- 
debtedness cannot be deducted ex- 
cept to the extent that the whole 
amount ot interest paid upon bond- 
ed or other indebtedness does not 
exceed an amount paid upon a sum 
not in excess ot the paid-up capital 
stock outstanding at the close of 
the year. 

This latter ruling has worked in- 
justice to real estate owners, who 
were not only required to pay the 
income tax, but also interest upon 
mortgage indebtedness. It received 
the careful attention of the law and 
legislative committee of the advis- 
ory council of real estate interests, 
Walter Lindner, chairman, and the 
advisory council is now able to an- 
nounce that the injustice of the de- 
cision has been remedied by the 
Treasury Department, under date 
ot Dee. 14. Under the heading with 
reference to rulings in relation to 
corporation income tax, is the fol- 
lowing: 

As used in the act the expression 
"collateral the subject ot sale, &c, 
refers to' physical or tangible prop- 
erty bound for the performance of 
certain covenants or payments of 
certain obligations, and which 
physical or tangible property is the 
"subject of sale in the ordinary bus- 
iness of a corporation" owning the 
same. Where such corporation is, 
as a matter of its ordinary busi- 
ness engaged in buying and selling, 
or dealing in such property, the in- 
terest actually paid within the year 
on indebtedness wholly secured by 
such collateral may be allowably de- 
ducted from gross income as ex- 
pense ot doing business, without re- 
gard to the limit of deductible in- 
terest as otherwise provided by the 
statute. The corporation, &c, must 
be organized and operated for the 
purpose of buying, selling, and 
dealing in the particular kind of 
property which becomes collateral 
in question, and the particular 
kind of property pledged for the 
debt upon which the interest is 
paid must be the "subject ot sale in 
the ordinary business of the corpor- 
ation." Real estate mortgaged, and 
the property of corporations organ- 
ized for and engaged in the busi- 
ness of buying, selling, and dealing 
in real estate: warehouse receipts 
representing property the subject of 
sale in the ordinary business of the 
corporation owning the same, and 



which warehouse receipts are pledg- 
ed as collateral for such corpora- 
tion's own debt, are examples where 
the interest paid will be deductible 
as a "business expense" and not be 
subject to the statutory limitation 
as to interest deduction. 



Fine Points for the Would be Ex- 
pert in Auction Bridge 
By Florence Irwin 

In America the game of auction is 
made and regulated by the mass of 
intelligent players. They try each 
proposed innovation and establish 
or discard it. Nothing can stop 
them from adopting a thing they 
like; nothnng can force them to ac- 
cept one they dislike. 

The card clubs are generally the 
last to fall into line when an im- 
portant change is made. They 
adopt an innovation when it is im- 
possible longer to refrain. Witness 
the new count, which was almost 
unversally played under the noses 
of the clubs before it was officially 
recognized by them. Being import- 
ant, being in the limelight, they 
are necessarily ultra-conservative. 
Admittedly, they make no changes 
until those changes become forced 
upon them; they accept no innova- 
tion till it has been tried and stand- 
ardized. Who then is to "try" it 
and "standardize" it, if not the 
players -at large? 

You have heard of the "Butter- 
Scotchmen," who couldn't run till 
they got hot, ((being butter- 
scotch,) and couldn't get hot till 
they ran, (being Scotchmen:) we 
would find ourselves in the same 
dilemma if the card clubs waited 
for the players at large and the 
players waited for the clubs, before 
a thing could be standardized. 

The clubs make no pretensions to- 
ward regulating the game for any 
but their own members. They are 
willing to decide questions that are 
referred to them but if they arro- 
gate-to themselves no universal au- 
thority. Even different clubs play 
differently. I know of no American 
club that has officially adopted the 
privilege of the opening pass and 
the new slam values. Yet both are 
used by nearly all players in all sec- 
tions of the country. 

In England it is quite otherwise. 
The clubs make the game and the 
players accept it. There is an occa- 
sional exception, as in the case of 
the new count, which was used in 
almost all private houses before the 
clubs would take it up. But in 
nearly all cases the elubs make the 
game for the players. And there is 
an excellent reason for this. Eng- 
land is a much smaller country 
than America. Nevertheless, when 
card rules are to be altered or card 
changes discussed, no one club un- 
dertakes to do it. Delegates are ap- 
pointed from all the important 
clubs, and they decide all questions. 
When the rules finally appear they 
are joint rules, and every one is, 
naturally, satisfied with them. 

I would give anything if this sys- 
tem could be adopted here; if once 



Saturday, January 9, 1915. 



THE WASl' 



in three or four year- there oould 
be a great national congress to de- 
Bide mooted questions and to regu- 
late the laws, This should be held 
jlrst in one city, then in another. 
All changes should be voted on at 
it- sittings; if accepted they should 
be universally established; if 
Downed they should either be per- 
manently killed or hold over till the 
next sessioni the game in the mean- 
time proceeding without them. The 
concensus ol opinion ol the players 
at large could be obtained definitely 
on all subjects. And there should 
be a standing hoard ol arbitration 
tor the decision of all questions of 
etiquette. 

Failing this, we shall never have a 
universal standard. Americans arc 
self-reliant and experimental by nat- 
ure. They like short Governments 
and a large voice in the making of 
those Governments. They want 
(and properly) a finger in every 
important pie that they are to be 
forced to swallow. And they know 
very well that all the brains and 
acumen in the country are not cen- 
tered in any one city. 

Why should New York regulate 
tin' game of auction for Chicago? 
Why should San Francisco tell 
Washington how to play? What 
about all the other places that have 
their experts and their ideas? Tail- 
ing a national congress, we are 
forced to one of two things— local- 
isms, or one small club in rjne city 
dictating the methods for universal 
adoption. We choose, very proper- 
ly, localisms as the lesser of the two 
evils. In the matter of the etiquette 
alone we arc obliged to accept a 
universal standard; and, even here, 
there is dissatisfaction. 

I have never yet seen a person 
who liked the new revoke laws. 
Three tricks (150 points) for one 
side and 100 points for the other 
does not appeal to the American 
sense of fair play. Given a congress, 
I know that would be knocked end- 
wise in the first session. I am ab- 
solutely sure that nullos would be 
officnally adopted as an insepar- 
able part of the game, like no- 
trumps; and I think there would 
be a very hot argument against the 
present official fashion of scoring in 
three-handed auction. This is so 
much disliked that half the players 
I know refuse to countenance it. 

Let me take an example that I 
have already mentioned twice. Three 
men are playing auction, and at the 
end of the evening they stand thus: 
A, 1,100; B, S00; C, 400. Now, ac- 
cording to the standard laws, A 
wins 700 points from C and 300 
from B, while B wins 400 from C. 
Anyone with half an eye can see 
that this is excessive winning and 
excessive losing. If A wins from two 
men and B from one, that makes 
three losers represented. And if C 
loses to two men and B to one, 
that makes three winners. Three 
losers and three winners — six men — 
in a three-handed game. How does 
that strike you? 

I know men who so decry this sys- 



tem that they refuse Bo play In a 
three-handed game. And I know 
others who insist on the fairer 
method ol -coring in the teeth of 
the laws. The fairer method is the 

proportionate one. Add the gross 

-ores ii.ioo plus 800 plus loo equals 
2,300) and divide that sum by 3, 
(766 plus;) measure that last figure 

against each man's score and let 

him win, or lose, the difference, 

In this way there are but three 
players represented. There may be 
one winner and two losers or one 
loser and two winners, or one man 
may stand pat and there may be 
one winner and one loser. But 
there are but three players— not six 
—in a three-handed game. 



THE BOOST BUSINESS 

"Men speak much too often. A 
glance of the eye, Reginald, a 
glance of tile eye." 

The Panama-California Exposi- 
tion at San Diego is humming. The 
San Diego papers talk of a raid of 
twenty thousand on the familiar 
pay-as-you-enter turnstile Sunday. 
This is all very well, and we rather 
like San Diego, but why should 
John W. Barrett of the Pan-Ameri- 
can Union get off stuff like this: 
"It is the finest thing I have ever 
seen assembled and I have seen 
every exposition in this country." 
Undoubtedly it is a very fine thing, 
but this everlasting praising in the 
superlative always reminds us of 
the fat lady in the circus. Not of 
anything the fat lady may say, un- 
derstand, but just of the fat lady 
herself, which is ample. Poor John! 
He is a rather fine fellow and can- 
not help it. It is a way of being 
on to his job. It is the kind of 
palaver the people want, or do they 
want it. that is, really? Isn't it pos- 
sible they have grown tired of this 
boost stuff and indiscriminate 
orange provided so regularly and 
without change? Do not qualities 
speak for themselves any more and 
does not too much speaking of 
them drive real qualidities away? 
Even in this city, is this not true? 
Does not the vulgar bray of a cer- 
tain inhabitant of the desert min- 
gle a little in the noise we make? 
The old San Francisco, which was 
the best beloved on earth, knew no 
such trait, but sat serene, indiffer- 
ent, and magnificent. But it would 
seem that we have lost our spirit of 
the aristocratic and gone selling pa- 
pers with the newsboys — Yes! 



Mr. Nat Goodwin, playing in Illin- 
ois, is ill? He wont on the stage at 
a temperature of 103. We have seen 
him off the stage frequently with 
his temperature higher than that. 
Wasn't it Nat who wrote the mod- 
est story of why the women adored 
him? An examination of his head 
might show a feminine abecss. Yet, 
after all, he has really done some 
good in the world. He has helped 
to keep matrimony popular. 



THE UNHAPPY LADY 
By Paul Gwynne 

I have the honor of knowing a 
lady who owns a limousine. I put 
it that way because a limousine 
describes her. llcv poise is limous- 
ine. She is about thirty-live, if one 
dare guess a woman's age, and has 
been a widow two years. She has 
many friends, or acquaintences, a 
thousand invitations to go out. 
This is all agreeable to her because 
freedom is her point of view. Yet 
when you praise life to her she 
shrugs her shoulders. 

I bowed to her on the street the 
other day while she was taking 
leave of another lady. This lady 
was tall and slender, with the sun- 
light caught in her hair, and some- 
thing blooding and lovely in her 
face. I had only a glimpse of her 
however. For my friend left her 
and I paused to pay my respects, 
"f want you to come and see a pict- 
ure T bought," she said. "It is some- 
thing new in oil. I would like to 
have your opinion." 

"Oh, very well," I agreed. In the 
limousine she began to toll me 

about Mrs. X , the woman to 

whom she had boon speaking. 
"Poor Helen," she said, "she married 
unfortunately. A newspaper man — 
and she w r as so pretty! She is ex- 
tremely pretty now. He is a good 
fellow, of course, thinks the world 
of her, but he has nothing except 
his salary. And they have a child — 
just think of it. Wherever they go 
they have to cadge the child with 
them. Helen, the poor thing, is 
simply done for. I never speak to 
her of it because she does not seem 
to see it that way, or, perhaps, wont 
let herself. But one never sees her 
out any more; I mean, in places 
that count. She is buried unless 
she gets a divorce and finds some- 
one who really can spend money on 
her and make her happy." 

"Yet she docs not appear dowdy," 
I suggested. 

"No; she dresses exquisitely — al- 
ways did; makes most of her own 
dresses, I imagine." 

A week later I happened to call 
on an artist friend, somewhat cele- 
brated. It was my first visit to his 
studio, though we had long been 
friends. I looked at his pictures 
then from his window out on a 
lawn bordered with nodding 
roses where a young woman 
and a little boy made happy 
throatings playing with a ball. 
The little boy was possibly 
not yet four. He was handsome, 
rosy-cheeked, and laughing. Even 
his pink legs seemed to laugh. Ev- 
ery now and then the woman drew 
her to him and kissed him, rolled 
him, and kissed him again. It was 
a pretty sight. The sun, itself, joy- 
ed in it, made a thousand glowing 
tints in the woman's brown hair, 
brought out the wonderful tender- 
ness of her eyes, the soft beauty of 
her mouth, the indescribable charm 
about her which reminded one of 



the nodding, brooding roses and 
was simply motherhood. 

My friend, who is more than forty, 
came to my elbow. "Some day," he 
said, "when I am a better artist 
than 1 am, I may be able to paint 
that picture. I shall call it 'Happi- 
ness.' i have watched them here 
day after day. Sometimes the 
young husband joins the party. 
They are wonderfully in love with 
each other, or merely in love with 
each other .as you choose to put it. 
The child is a little God Pan. They 
live in the flat below. About a 
month ago I had dinner witli them. 
Such happiness! One rarely sees it 
these days. People don't go after it 
right." His Paris-trained hand 
swept the city and its tinsel crav- 
ings back to the glowing opal of 
the bay and his paint-stained fin- 
gers lingered pointing on the scene 
below. "That is the real joy of liv- 
ing and the woman knows it." 

'What are their names?" I asked, 
something familiar in her appear- 
ance growing on me. 

He told me. It was the woman of 
whom the lady in the limousine 
had spoken. 



Lord Wimborne, who has been 
appointed Lord Lieutenant of Ire- 
land, succeeding Lord Aberdeen, is 
known by several of the bon-ton of 
this city. He is the man who lifted 
the polo cup last year in New York. 
It is rumored that at that time 
something of a romance developed 
between he and a former San Fran- 
cisco girl who is now resident in 
the East, and who saw a great 
deal of him during his visit. At 
any rate, we can speak for the lady. 
One never knows about an English- 
man. Wasn't it Eleanor Sears who 
accused them of having silk man- 
ners? But they have a reputation 
for being true, and this Lord, it 
seems, forgot not for a moment the 
blue eyes of England while he smil- 
ed a little at lotus-eyed, fair- 
haired America. 



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Store 5, Cor. Carl and Cole Streets 

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Store 7, Cor. Powell and Sutter Streets 



THE WASP 



Saturday, January 9, 1915 




THE WOMAN'S PART 

Beside my ruined cottage, desolate, 
The children cowering 'round me, 
mute from fright, 
With tearless eyes and brooding 
heart, 
I wait, 
Watching through all the long, 
the weary night. 
God of the homeless, look from 

Heaven and see! 
Out of the deeps, a woman calls on 
Thee! 

My little ones,, they cry all day for 

bread, 
And 'neath the shelter of my 

meagre breast, 
Stirs one unborn, who must e'er 

long be fed — 
Another babe to hunger with the 

rest. 
Madonna Mary, hear a mother's 

moan ! 
Pity the travail I must bear alone! 

The tasseled corn would plenteous 

harvest yield, 
But all the crops are rotting in 

the sun. 
Where are the reapers? On some 

battle-field 
They fight for nought and die 

there, one by one! 
God's comfort be upon them where 

they lie, 
Sheep to war's shambles driven — 

who knows why? 

Death and destruction walk by day, 
by night, 
Men's blood is spilt and sacrificed 
in vain, 
While women wait for tidings of 
the fight 
Who may not even sepulchre 
their slain ! 
They say "God's in His Heaven" — 

but, instead, 
'Twould seem He is asleep — or, may- 
be, dead ! 

MAZIE V. CARUTHERS. 



The elder Mr. Sherman of the lo- 
cal music house was out driving his 
pair of horses one day recently, 
when he noticed that the near horse 
was doing all the work. 

"That's a willing horse," he said 
to his coachman, pointing to the 
animal. 

"Oh, yes," agreed the coachman, 
"they're both willing!" 

"Both willing!" went on the gen- 
tleman, astonished. "How do you 
make that out?" 

"Why, the near un's willing to 
do all the pulling and the off un's 
willing to let him." 



FOR LOVERS 

The electro-magnet, which is being 
successfully used in French hosr 
pitals for the extraction of bullets 
has manifested possibilities. Re- 
cently the United States Steel Com- 
pany, by means of electo-magnetic 
power, recovered from the bed of 
the Missisippi a cargo of nails 
which had go n e to the bottom. 
The magnet used in this case was 
SVs feet in width and weighed 
3000 lb. 

The ease with which the cargo was 
brought to the surface gave rise to 
suggestion that, given a sufficient- 
ly big magnet, sunken submarines 
might be similarly salved at short 
notice. 

About a quarter of a century ago 
a French enthusiast published de- 
tails of a truly ambitious electo- 
magnetic scheme. By magnetism, 
he explained, the moon could be 
brought down to the earth, and 
allowed gently to rest on the Sahar- 
an desert. That done, it would be 
absurdly simple to avail ourselves 
of the immense mineral resources of 
our satellite. 

As it happened, however, the 
thing was never attempted — prob- 
ably because it was discovered that 
the mineral wealth of the moon 
would be a very poor substitute 
for the lunar tides of the ocean, the 
stoppage of which would tend to 
paralize the watcrborne commerce 
of the world! 



A local editorial says that men 
who live to a great age have never 
amounted to much, but how about 
Titian, who died untimely of the 
plague in 1576 in his hundredth 
year? Not even the present war is 
likely to consign his name to ob- 
livion. How about Sir Moses Monte- 
fiore, (1784-1885,) the English phil- 
anthropist and Chevreul, (1786-18S9,) 
the French chemist? How about 
Manuel Garcia, (1805-1906,) the teach- 
er of Jenny Lind, Mathilde Mar- 



chesi, Julius Stockhausen, and a 
host of celebrated singers and 
teachers, and also the inventor of 
the laryngoscope? Three Kings re- 
membered to send him congratula- 
tory messages, and the musical and 
medical professions in London ten- 
dered him a banquet on his hun- 
dredth birthday. How about the 
centenarian (I forget his name) 
whose "scare-babe mighty voice" is 
commemorated on the west wall of 
Petcrboro Cathedral? In his youth 
he had the honor of ridding one of 
Henry VIII.'s wives of her head, 
and, later, of decapitating Mary 
Queen of Scots. 

A better memory than mine could 
probably recall offhand a number 
of other cases of centenarions much 
more useful in their day to society 
than the turtles to whom the are 
so unfeelingly likened. But the 
instances offered are sufficient to 
demand a qualification. 



POETRY'S GOLDEN AGE 

The prophecy of Madison J. Caw- 
ein in regard to the Golden Age of 
poetry, especially American poetry, 
has now come true. ■ It was evi- 
dently written before the beginning 
of the present revival of interest in 
poetry and the drama, before such 
poets as Edwin Arlington Robin- 
son, George Sterling, Olive Tilford 
D-argan, Louis V. Ledoux, Vachel 
Lindsay, Louis Untermeyer, James 
Oppenheim, Lascalles Abercrombie, 
William H. Davies, John Drink- 
water, Eugene Claudel, Emil Ver- 
hacren, and Hugo von Hofmarm- 
sthal had achieved the high degree 
of success that is theirs today. Bliss 
Carman, Richard Le Gallienne, 
Percy Mackaye, Cawein himself, 
Stephen Phillips, Ezra Pound, Al- 
fred Noyes, William Watson, Kip- 
ling, and Yeats had already ap- 
peared above the horizon and had 
achieved a fair degree of success. The 
forerunners of twentieth century 
verse were well known, and many 
of them had ceased to sing. These 
included Whitman, Hovey, Henley, 
Rosetti, Swinburne, Thompson, and 
Wilde, whose work really belonged 
to the present era rather than that 
of the nineteenth century. 

Truly, the above is a formidable 
array and compares favorably Only 
with the well-known singers of Eliz- 
abethan times. It is true that a 
hundred years or so ago a handful 
of English poets, among them Scott, 
Shelley, Keats, and Byron, pro- 



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duced really great poetry, but when 
they ceased there were none to take 
their places and the promised re- 
naissance never came. Immediately 
there followed a period of exceeding 
barrenness, not alone in poetry but 
in all the fine arts. America during 
this period produced but one poet 
worthy of the name, Edgar Allen 
Poe. Poets who were popular dur- 
ing this time, Longfellow, Whittier, 
and Tennyson, among others, pro- 
duced hardly anything of lasting 
merit; most of their work was 
destined to survive only in the 
scrap-books of the over sentimental. 



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Saturday, January 9, 1915. 



THE WASP 









No Aviating for Him 

Aviation has been stricken from 
Hie list uf ambitions of Dudley 
Cates, well-known local clubman, 
former editorial writer of the old 
Evening Post, and now one of the 
banking fraternity. No longer does 
he nourish a desire to view the Ex- 
position grounds from mid-air, to 
Indulge in the exhilarations of an 
aerial dip, or to fly over the ferry- 
boats criss-crossing the bay. For 
all time terra-lirma will be good 
enough lor Cates. He embodied 
this in one of his New Year resolu- 
tions. 

All of which, as a peroration, is 
set down by way of explaining 
that Cates nearly took an aeroplane 
fide. A fortnight ago he was a 
member of a jolly dinner party at 
a downtown restaurant. Trro sub- 
ject of aviating came up arid Cates 
evinced a desire to take a trip with 
Ghristoffcrscn. So did Frederick 
Paigne, another of the party. 

Stirred on by the friends, the two 
venturesome young men decided 
that the ride should be taken the 
following Sunday. Their compan- 
ions were to watch the flight. 

But then arose the first serious 
question— who should fly first? 
They decided to match coins. The 
winner should be the first to glide 
through the clouds in an aero- 
plane. 

"I hope f win," said Cates, extend- 
ing the hand that contained a coin. 
"I have a feeling that if I don't go 
first I will never get into an aero- 
plane." 

Cates lost. When Sunday came 
Paigne went out to Christofferson's 
hangars and said he wanted to 
take a trip over the bay. The rest 
of the party, Cates included, was 
stationed on the waterfront to 
watch the flight. 

Over the bay soared Paigne in 
the aeroplane. Cates, with throb- 
bing heart, watched the flight. 
Then, suddenly, there came a shriek 
from one of the women of the party. 
The others covered up their faces 
with their hands. The machine 
had dropped and the fliers were 
treated to a dip in the bay close to 
Alcatraz. 

"I knew I'd never go up if I wasn't 
first," said Cates, after he had re- 
solved that good, dry land was 
good enough for him. 

Unique Telephone Service 
"Everything going out but noth- 
ing coming in." 



By John C. Observer. 



This is a policeman's own descrip- 
tion of the latest feature added to 
the complex system of telephone ser- 
vice of the San Francisco Police De- 
partment, a system so unique that 
it is unknown and unnecessary else- 
where in the city. 

More specifically, three new lines 
have been added to the depart 
menfs telephone service but over 
these new lines no messages may be 
sent to the private exchange oper- 
ator of the department. They only 
can be used by the operator send- 
ing messages outside. Here is the 
reason: 

Several weeks ago when the tall 
flagstaff surmounting the Bank of 
Italy building was struck by a 
lightning flash and splintered, calls 
galore from frightened people came 
to the police department. Scores 
had heard exaggerated reports and 
wanted particulars. 

For an hour every one of theh 
many "trunk" lines connecting po- 
lice headquarters with the outside 
world were busy with these calls 
from outsiders about the broken 
flagpole. 

During this time several high offi- 
cers of the department watched the 
switchmen and were startled with 
the realization that should a great 
crime be reported or any other 
emergency arise requiring immedi- 
ate communication with the out- 
side, there would be no telephone 
lines open and free to use. 

The matter was taken up, with 
the result that there is added to 
the department's service the three 
lines over which no calls can come 
to headquarters but which are kept 
exclusively for sending calls from 
the Hall of Justice. 



Getting All the Facts 
A story of the insurance company 

that was intent on getting "the 
truth, the whole truth and nothing 
For an hour every one of the 
world were busy with these calls 
but the truth," before settling a 
claim, was related a few days ago 
in the lobby of the St. Francis by 
Henry Neufrom, a Sonoma County 
fanner who comes to town occasion- 
ally to talk things over with the 
bovs. 

It seems that Neufron, to protect 
himself against employers' liability, 
has taken out insurance policies 
covering his various ranch hands. 
Several weeks ago, one of the hired 
men, Neufron says, was kicked by 
a mule and seriously injured. 

Neufron being liable under the 
new state law, lost no time in for- 
warding his claims to the insurance 
C0\mpany. In return he received 
divers forms which were to be filled 
out, giving accurate and detailed 
information not only of the acci- 
dent but of the habits of the in- 
jured one. 

With much care Neufron answer- 
ed the many questions and return- 
ed the papers. Soon came another 
batch of papers and in addition 
a special letter making a number of 
additional inquiries about the case. 
And one of the questions asked 
was, "Has that mule ever been in 

trouble before?" 

# ■>:■ # # 

The Legislature is with us again. 
This time they promise to sing soft- 
ly and dance measures light and 
not too fantastic. Doubtless they 
are tired from their extraordinary 
exertions of last year. Even towns 
like Los Angeles, given over to 




physics, clairvoyants and assigna- 
tions, cannot produce Assembly- 
men and Senators who can bill a 
foxtrot and keep it going to liaik- 
at-the-heel music year after year. At 
the very worst we have still some- 
thing to thank Heaven for. No, 
not the Assemblymen and salvoing 
Senators, but for the rest they arc 
obliged to take sometimes from mis- 
chief. 



Justice Triumphs 

Anyone having a notion that just- 
ice in this country is either dead or 
sleeping will be reassured by the 
verdict against Henry Siegel, wild- 
cat banker and department store 
magnet. Fifteen thousand people 
deposited their hard earned sav- 
ings with him to the extent of two- 
and one-half millions of dollars, on- 
ly to have it nearly swept away in 
Seigels losing enterprises. 

But the stern, inexplorable Law 
made after him. "Ha! my good fel- 
low, you shall suffer for this," de- 
clared the sagacious and perspica- 
cious Law. Whereupon the Law 
fined him guilty, fined him in the 
tremendous sum of two thousand 
dollars, and sentenced him to serve 
ten months (not years) in jail. The 
fine he will pay, but the jail sent- 
ence is postponed. Now he can go 
out and apply his well-known effic- 
ient and underhand methods to ob- 
tain from trusting Peters enough 
money to reimburse the impoverish- 
ed Pauls. 

The fine averages about six cents 
for each depositor, while the suffer- 
ing from the sentence, if he ever 
serves it, will be less than that ex- 
perienced by any of the depositors 
through loss of his life's savings. 

Where is there a more beautiful 
sight than Justice when it is in 
good working order?— Life. 



A New Anthem 



My auto' tis of thee, short cut to 
poverty — of thee I chant. I blew a 
pile of dough on thee two years ago, 
and now you quite refuse to go, or 
won't or can't. Through town and 
countryside, you were my joy and 
pride; a happy day. I loved thy 
gaudy hue, thy nice white tires so 
new, but now you're down and out 
for true, in every way. To thee, old 
rattlebox, came many bumps and 
knocks; for then I grieve. Badly 
thy top is torn, frayed are the seats 
and worn; the whooping cough aff- 
ects thy horn. I do believe. Thy 
perfume swells the breeze while 
good folks choke and sneeze, as we 
pass by. I paid for thee a price 
'twould buy a mansion twice, now 
everybody's yelling "ice" — I wonder 
why? Thy motor has the pip, even 
the skid chains slip, and woe is 
thine. I, too, have suffered chills, 
ague and kindred ill, endeavoring 
to pay my bills since thou wert 
mine. Gone is my bank roll now. 
No more 'twould choke a cow, as 
once before. Yet if I had the mon, 
so help me John— amen, I'd buy my- 
self a car again, and speed some 
more. 



10 



THE WASP 



Saturday, January 9, 1915 



THE WOMAN BEAUTIFUL 




Curfew for Father 

Mrs. Helen Robinson, of Denver, 
who hears the unique distinction 
of being the only woman Senator 
in the United States, has paused 
in her arduous duties of state to 
formulate, as it were, a few rules 
for regulating the habits and eon- 
duct of husbands and fathers. 

Somehow in reading the various 
articles by Mrs. Robinson and the 
opinions and theories therein con- 
tained regarding the regulating of 
the conduct of the male of the 
species, one cannot but feel a great 
wave of sympathy for Mr. Robin- 
son, if there is such a person. 

Perhaps it would be more in 
keeping with the idea of Christian 
charity to fervently hope there is 
no "Lord and Master" in the home 
of Robinson to be used as he might 
be for experimental purposes in the 
various methods of "henpecking." 

No man has ever been hurt by 
having a little "henpecking" judi- 
ciously applied, but to have the 
fact advertised to the world by the 
supposedly weaker vessel of the 
household partakes of the nature 
of rubbing salt in the wound. 

I wonder why it is that "lady" 
politicians and strong-minded suff- 
ragettes seem to despise all men 
and to have an eager craving to 
reduce them to the status of the 
smallest, most insignificant worm. 

Mrs. Robinson's latest discussion 
centers around the final wrenching 
away of all rights and privileges 
from husbands and fathers by ring- 
ing a Curfew bell. 

At the first careless glance that 
would seem all right, unless the 
curfew ringer was a too ardent be- 
liever in the old theory of "Early 
to bed," etc. 

But there is just where the rub 
comes in, for that Curfew bell is 
going to be rung very early, so early 
in fact, that it will not be worth 
while to go out at all after dinner 
unless the wife goes along. 

Then consider how awkward it 
would be to have an officer stop a 
man and woman on the street and 
make them prove right then and 
there that they were married— that 
is, to each other. 

Of course, under the Curfew Act 
no person would take a chance of 
being held up with the legal part- 
ner of someone else; and perhaps 
having it recorded on the police 
blotter. 

Another thing is if these Curfew 
ideas for husbands should go 
through young men will insist 
upon this world being a place 
whore there "Shall be no marrying 
or giving in marriage." And that 



won't do at all for even suffragettes, 
when they are too young to know 
better, want to get married. 

But on the other hand, the little 
matter of making a plan practic- 
able has never yet seemed to make 
any difference to a theorist. 

Even with the Curfew in full 
force Mrs. Robinson says, "Many 
wives would still prefer their poo- 
dles." More entertaining! 

Mrs. Robinson also says that, 
"Fatherhood in many families is re- 
garded as merely the symbol of the 
check book." Poor Father! with 
his last year's suit and his two 
years before that overcoat, working 
like a Trojan to measure up to the 
family standard of what the check 
book should be! 

Men and women should declare a 
truce and try to find out where 
the trouble lies with them, and 
whose fault it is. 

That matter of Father being just 
the "symbol of the check book" may 
have much to do with it. Father 
may finally get tired of traveling 
that unexciting, beaten path from 
his office to his home and then 
being only a "symbol" after he gets 
there. 

At any time he may get the "per- 
sonal equation" idea in his head 
and want to be important to some 
one for himself alone. 

That may account for the other- 
wise unaccountable conduct of 
some heretofore irreproachable mid- 
dle-aged husband who suddenly 
evinces an irrisistable desire to bask 
in the sunlight of the smile of some 
fair lady, who is in no way con- 
nected with his family, and to go 
wandering with her in the far-away 
land of the Primroses, from whose 
borne few male travelers ever return 
save by the alimony route. 



The "Canned" Age 
"This is not a moving picture 
show," say the placards of such 
human performances as still remain. 
"His singing is as good as his rec- 
ords," says a San Francisco critic of 
a famous tenor. "This painting is 
really hand-painted," says the deal- 
er. "See these mistakes and imper- 
fections." It will not be long before 
an announcement of a piano con- 
cert will have to read, "This artist 
positively plays by hand." And ev- 
en in a political campaign, the 
party committee, by 1920, will have 
to announce that "the candidate 
will positively be present in person 
and deliver his own speech." 

We have gone so fast that no one 
could now see a joke in the Chicago 
pork-maker's remarks, "We can ev- 
erything but the squeal." We have 
long since canned the squeal; and 
the kick and the wiggle, too. We 
have embalmed thought: We sell 
thrills by the reel, emotion by the 
disc or cylinder. There is a machine 
in the corner that will laugh or 
cry with you, according to what 
record you put in; and Caruso will 
sing for you, or Roosevelt speak for 
you in your parlor, twenty times 
for a cent. 

It is the canned age; but it has 
democratized the finer things of life. 



It has universalized the once-rare 
privileges. There is no more isola- 
tion or dreariness. No soul need 
now shrivel in the life-long contem- 
plation of a Kansas plain or a ten- 
ement alley, when you can travel 
through Yosemite for a nickel. The 
barnstorming Uncle Tom's Cabin 
company no longer represents the 
summit of dramatic art, when every 
village can see good acting on the 
screen for a dime. Gospel hymns 
on the melodeon need not starve 
any music-hungry soul, when at 
least some one in the village can get 
Beethoven on a paper roll. The art 
world is not closed when you can 
get high-art illustrations on the 
front page every week for a nickel. 
There are more good pictures in the 
dreariest village in Nebraska today 
than there were in Florence when 
that city revolutionized the art of 
the world. And one can live in 
Daggett, on the desert, and hear 
more good music than existed in 
the world when Mozart was born. 
As to literature, there is more of it 
accessible in Selma than was stored 
in the library at Alexandria. 

The supreme reaches of art are 
just as they always were, and their 
rarity will never change. Great 
artists come only a few in a century, 
and in some forms of art only a 
scant half-dozen in the history of 
the world. Those who can fully ap- 
preciate the greatest art arc never 
more than a few thousands at any 
one time. Nothing will ever make 
real greatness anything but the 
scarcest and most valuable thing in 
the world. But if great art is worth 
anything, then even the secondary 
distribution of second-rate art to 
the millions instead of to the scores 
is the most revolutionary thing that 
has happened in the history of the 
human spirit. 

It is the canned age. But what we 
have canned is the Infinite. 



The Misanthrope 

Brown is a melancholy soul. Ru- 
mor hath it that once he was cross- 
ed in love. At any rate, he is usual- 
ly pessimistic about things in gen- 
eral, and always particular as to 
what he eats. 

The other day he went into a res- 
taurant, and having scanned the 
luncheon menu, said to the waiter. 

"I see you have some calves' 
hearts." 

"Yes, sir — yes, sir," agreed the 
waiter, busily flicking crumbs 
from the table cloth. 

"Well, how about it?" continued 
Brown. "Are they tender?" 

"Yes, sir," declared the waiter. 
"Beautifully tender." 

"Then bring me some," he said. 
"If there is such a thing as a ten- 
der heart, I want it." 



One talking-machine plus one me- 
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portrait of Whistler's mother plus 
two beer-steins e'quals one refined 
American home. 



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GOURAUD'S ORIENTAL TOILET 

POWDER 

For infants and adults. Exquisitely 

perfumed. Relieves Skin Irritations, cures 

Sunburn and renders an excellent complex 

ion. Price, 26 cents, by mail. 

GOURAUD'S POUDRE SUBTILE 
Removes Superfluous Hair. Price SI, by 

Mail. 

FERD. T. HOPKINS, Prop., 87 breat 

Jones St., New York City. 



THE 




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Your present Piano accepted as 
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Bacon Block 



tiray hair restored to its natural col- 
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Saturday, January 9, 1915. 



THE WASP 



11 



ENGLISH GHOSTS ON FLEMISH 
FIELDS 

Thomas Atkins is not the type ol 
man who Bees ghosts easily. Some- 
times as in- stands on sentry-go in 
the early dawn, chilled to the mar- 

rofl i is after a aight watch at 

Jfpres, or lies on his stomach in the 
slush beyond the first line of 
trenches on the Xser, he seems to 
bco vague shadow figures advanc- 
ing toward him through the mist 
UN finger trembles on the trigger. 
The safety of the men sleeping be- 
hind him depends on his vlgilence. 
Shall he shout out the chal- 
lenge? "Halt! Who goes there?" * * 
lie would look a bloomin" tool if 

those shadows were only the speck S 

of darkness that float before his 
strained eyes. Perhaps he has the 
giddy jimjams after three days un- 
der shell lire. He stares and stares, 
through the white mist which steels 
across the marshes, suspecting Ger- 
mans. 

lie never suspects ghosts — and 
yet I think that old ghosts must lie 
astir in Flanders now that an Eng- 
lish army is encamped there again, 
with Edward, Prince of Wales, on 
the Headquarters staff. Out of the 
mists of time there must surely 
(■nine some of those English gentle- 
men and men-at-arms who more 
than live centuries ago panic with 
another Prince of Wales, called Ed- 
ward to light against heavy odds, 
in and about all those towns in 
Belgium and France which, again, 
have become familiar in our mouths 
as household words— St. Omcr,, 
Yprcs, Arras, Soissons, Rheims. St. 
Quentin, Gravelines, Dunkirk, Ca- 
lais, and Abbeville, Lille and Ar- 
mentneres. 

Private Thomas Atkins doesn't 
bother about historic spooks. But 
his officers, who are presumed to 
have read a little history, (they get 
a smattering at Oxford.) occasion- 
ally have glimpses of things beyond 
the length of their noses, and some 
of them are conscious now, in 
Fiance and Flanders, of voices 
which speak to them out of the 
past, and of ghost-faces which peer 
at them out of the shell-wrecked 
towns of Belgium and in the dark 
streets of French seaports. 

They are English voices and Eng- 
lish faces, belonging to men of the 
same type and blood and spirit as 
themselves. They are the ghosts of 
their own forefathers, who walk 
with them along the lines of the 
trenches, who stand beside the 
guns, and come out of history to 
give a greeting to these modern 
knights. 



N.Warshauer 



F.Warshauer 



Warshauer Brothers 

TAILORS 
49 Geary Street 

SAN FRANCISCO 



When the Bhells are shrieking over 
Ypres, smashing the beauty of the 

cloth Hall, shattering tin- old Llem- 

isli houses on each side of the mar- 
ket square, a little group of ghosts 

may have n n ^fn\ (by those 

who had eyes to gee) standing in the 

shelter of an ancient archway. Sir 
John Froissart would have been 
useful as a guide, for he could have 
pointed out each man as he moved 
about in his ghostly armor, anil 
would have narrated stirring tales 
of adventure and chivalry about 
the tall man with the eagle nose 
and steely eyes, and about the little 
-lout man with a scar down his 
cheek, and the lean, bronzed fellow 
who watched a busting shell with 
a hand above his eyes, as though 
it were a falcon stooping to its prey. 

Perhaps "Eye-Witness" knows the 
names of those silent ghosts, though 
he has not yet written about them 
in his dispatches, owing to the se- 
verity of the censor. He knows, I 
am sure, that a,mong those who 
watched the destruction of the 
Cloth Hall were Sir John Chandos— 
"the Mower of knighthood"— and 
Lord Thomas Percy, Sir Godfrey de 
Harcourt and Lord Reginald Cob- 
liain. Lord Thomas Holland and 
Lord Pelawarr,, Lord Robert Ne- 
ville, Lord Thomas Clifford, the 
Lord Bourchier, Lord Latimer, Sir 
Walter Manny— "sans pour et sans 
reproche"— and many other knights 
and squires, "who," as old Froissart 
said, "I cannot now name." 

They, the ancestors of British of- 
ficers who are now fighting in 
Flanders, knew every inch of this 
country along that line which we 
call "the front," at least as far as 
from Rheims to Nieuport. They 
rode under their banners over the 
flat marshlands of Flanders, they 
banqueted in many of the grand 
halls which now lie in ruins under 
the German Eagle, they stormed at 
the gates of many towns which are 
now filled with British soldiers, 
their lances glittered down many of 
the roads where the winter sun 
now glints upon the ianecs of the 
French dragoons: and with the 
chivalry of mediaeval knighthood 
they, did many acts of courtesy and 
valor and heroic adventure upon 
the same ground where the men un- 
der Sir John French have upheld 
the old traditions of their breed 
with no less courage. Also, accord- 
ing to the way of war, still adopted 
by German officers and men, (and 
we must be very careful of our ac- 
cusations, because our turn is com- 
ing to fight through hostile terri- 
tory,) they ravaged the countryside 
through which they passed, burned 
farmsteads and peasants' cots, 
swept it clean of all food, looted 
its treasures, and laid it waste, so 
that there was desolation and fam- 
ine where the English Army had 
passed. 

The old glow and color have gone 
out of this game of death. The oth- 
er day, wandering about the dark 
streets of Calais, I thought back to 
the days when the Lion of Eng- 
land sat at a high board in this 
town, with many knights richly 



dressed waiting upon their lord be- 
neath silken banners and flaming 
torches. Along the trenches of the 
"i pres and in the shell-wrecked town 
of Dixmundo the new way of light- 
ing did not seem to mc picturesque 
or chivalrous, or with any gay ad- 
venture in it. as when the forefath- 
ers of the men who now lie in the 
swampy trenches challenged their 

foes to single combat and praised 
the valor of their prisoners and 
made a pageantry of battle. 

Yet the same spirit is there as in 
the old days— the same breed of 
men. The schoolboy jests of the 
British soldier in the trenches, his 
dogged courage, his dash and en- 
durance come to him out of the 
bjood of those English archers who 
went fighting through France and 
Flanders five hundred years and 
more ago. The stock has not with- 
ered since then, nor lost its English 
sap. And those officers who were 
decorated by the King the other 
day for the rescue of comrades in 
the hottest fire, for acts of chivalry 
and heroism as splendid as any- 
thing in history, are heirs to the 
spirit of those knights who were 
present when the Most Noble Or- 
der of the Garter was first insti- 
tuted by Edward III for the forty 
great heroes who, "according to re- 
port and estimation," were the 
bravest men in Christendom. 



First Hand News 
Marshall Field, 3rd son of the late 
Marshall Field Jr., and Miss Evelyn 
Marshall, daughter of the late Char- 
les H. Marshall of New York, have 
taken out a marriage license. 
Their engagement was announced 
late in November. 



Edwin Markham's latest book, 
"California the Wonderful," was 
written at the request of the Pub- 
licity Committee of the Panama 
Exposition, who wanted an all- 
around story of the State to be 
ready for the opening of the exposi- 
tion in February. 



Louis Joseph Vance has returned 
to New York from the moving-pic- 
ture colony in Southern California, 
where he was called to inject more 
melodrama into his moving-picture 
serial, "The Trey o' Hearts." 



Alfred Noyes has joined the vol- 
unteer coast guard of England, and 
is now patrolling the chalk clics. 
celebrated in his "Drake" and other 
poems. He has written to his Amer- 
ican publishers: "We are all drill- 
ing, and it is not conducive to lit- 
erary work. However, I expect to 
come over in January." 



Ralph Connor— the Rev. Charles 
W. Gordon, D. D.— whose latest nov- 
el, "The Patrol of the Sun Dance 
Trail," is a recent publication, will 
sail this week for England and the 
war with his regiment, the Seventy- 
ninth Cameron Highlanders, whose 



chaplain he has been for several 

years. 

■::■ ■::- -:: ■;:■ 

Mr. George Lewis, of shreve Com- 
pany, will accompany the directors 
of the Exposition Company to San 
Diego next week to look over the 
Fair being held down there. 



Fritzi SchelT, in St. Louis, refused 
to go on because live extra orches- 
tra men had not been engaged. We 
wonder which one of the five Fritzi 
was so much interested in. Also 
we would like a list of the lady's 
infatuations, though we fear it 
might look somewhat like a peti- 
tion. 



Kuppenheimer 
Clothes 



acknowledged by every care- 
ful dresser as 



AMERICA'S FOREMOST 
( !L( )THES FOR MEN AND 
YOUNG MEN. 



Suits and Overcoats — All 
priced within reason. 



On sale in San Francisco 
Only at 

Sidney Q. UPP lt % 



SUCCSU3DING 



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,§ Phone Douglas 5370 

1 M. [. GALLAGHER . 

^ Fancy, Street, Eeception and Evening at 

I GOWNS I 

* WEDDING TKOUSSEAUX 3 

g & & jx 5 

§ 95-97 Whittell Bldg., 166 Geary St. g 
aft San Francisco. flj 

I The "Frances" 

HAIEDEESSING AND 
S MANICUBING PABLOES. 
| 110 GEAEY STREET. 

« Purchased and Now Conducted by 

| 7ffrs. J. Williams 

% Formerly Manager Hair Dressing § 
tS Dept., The Emporium. $ 

i^c^c^c^c^c^^<^<^<^X£9t<ol 



12 



THE WASP 



Saturday, January 9, 1915 



Brutal Assault of Mulcahy 

Last Saturday afternoon, January 
second, in the main corridor of the 
St. Francis Hotel, Richard E. Mul- 
cahy, resident partner of the E. F. 
Hutton -and Co., stock "brokers, 
without any provocation, attacked 
with his walking stick Mr. Charles 
H. Marshall, an employee of the 
Wasp. 

The attack was both brutal and 
cowardly, for Mulcahy struck Mar- 
shall without warning. So heavy 
was the blow that the latter fell 
to the floor unconscious and bleed- 
ing copiously from the wound on 
his head. Mulcahy, who is a power- 
ful man, dropped his broken stick 
and ran away. He hid himself in 
his room for several hours after the 
attack. 

Mr. Marshall was taken to an 
apartment in the St. Francis Hotel 
where he now lies under the care 
of a physician and a nurse. 

The trouble started over an article 
that appeared in the aJnuary-Sec- 
ond issue of the Wasp, in which 
Mr. Marshall commented on the E. 
F. Hutton and Co.'s activities. The 
two men met in the lobby of the 
St. Francis and when Mulcahy at- 
tempted to start an argument, Mr. 
Marshall refused to answer him and 
tried to pass by. The former then 
made his cowardly attack. 

Later Mulcahy attempted to justi- 
fy his action by claiming that Mr. 
Marshall had attacked him in the 
columns of the Wasp. As the latter 
has expleained many times, his fight 
is not against any individual, but 
against the System. The business of 
selling stock as carried on by such 
firms that have been criticised in 
the Wasp is nothing more or less 
than a gamble. The E. F. Hutton 
and Company several years ago was 
suspended from the privileges of the 
floor of the New York Stock Ex- 
change for certain irregularities. It 
was a long time before they were 
taken back into favor again. 

When men like Mulcahy take the 
law into their own hands it is time 
to put a stop to it. If newspaper 
men are to be attacked and beaten 
up for publishing the truth, then 
where is this thing we call the 




SoriE ARE BORN TO GREATNESS: SOME --ETC. 



THE MONEY MAKERS 

(By X-WALL) 



Freedom of the Press? Such news 
as this is published for the protec- 
tion and education of the public. 
When a newspaper has the courage 
to tell the truth about such things, 
along comes some Mulcahy (and 
there are plenty of them in this 
world) and shows his true calibre 
by acting the part of a rowdy in 
a public place. 

If an article is published in this 
paper that contains any misstate- 
ments, the proper place to protest 
is in the office of the Wasp itself. 
No hotel desires the notoriety that 
Mulcahy brought upon the St. 
Francis, one of the most popular 
hotels in the city. 

A similar case in New York City 
occurred recently where a broker 
attacked a newspaper man. He was 
found guilty of assault and sen- 
tenced to serve five years in prison. 
Mulcahy was arrested a few days 
ago. A like sentence should be 
meted out to him. 

We reprint below the article con- 
cerning E. F. Hutton and Co. to 
which Mulcahy objected: 

After all, it appears that E. F. 
Hutton and Company did not care 
to take chances on that "friendly" 
suit of the Crocker National Bank 
against them to recover $95,000 sunk 
by Assistant Cashier Charles F. 
Baker, of the Crocker National 
Bank in gambling trades with that 
firm. 

"This suit was in reality pressed 
by "Lloyds" who bonded Baker 



THE ANGLO & LONDON PARIS 
NATIONAL BANK 

SAN FRANCISCO 

Capital 5 4,000,000 

Surplus and Profits. 1,600,000 
Total Resources. . . . 40,000,000 

OFFICERS: 

Herbert Fleischhacker President 

Sig. Greenebaum. .Chairman of Board 
Washington Dodge... Vice-President 

J. Priedlander Vice-President 

C. F. Hunt Vice-President 

I - R. Altschul Cashier 

C. R. Parker Assistant Cashier 

Wm. H. High Assistant Cashier 

H. Choynski Assistant Cashier 

G. R. Eurdick Assistant Cashier 

G. F. Herr Assistant. Cashier 

A. L. Langerman Secretary 




with the Crocker National Bank. 
Baker must have been both plastic 
and pliant to have "dropped" such 
a large sum of money in such a 
brief space of time without ever- 
having had a show for his 'white 
alley'." 



French Finances in Good Shape 
Financial conditions have so far 
adjusted themselves in France that 
the resumption of payment on de- 
mand of deposits and current ac- 
counts by the most important 
banks of France has been decided 
upon. This action was taken by 
the principal banks independent of 
the government. They renounced 
voluntarily, the benefits of the mor- 
atorium, as far as the intergral re- 
imbursements of deposits and cur- 
rent accounts are concerned. This 
action brings back into circulation 
considerable sums of money which 
up to the present time have been 
hoarded away. Minister Delcasse, 
in speaking of this step said; "This 
demonstrates, during the five 
months of the war, when all the 
strength of the nation was respond- 
ing to our economic siutation, how 
much strain the finances of France 
could stand. It shows in a striking 
manner the financial prosperity of 
the country. 



Business Is Better 

Business conditions and prospects 
are declared to be "generally reas- 
suring" by the Chamber of Com- 
merce of the United tSates in a re- 
port made public this past week. 
The European war is acknowledged 
to have a widespread and depres- 
sing effect on industrial and com- 
mercial conditions. 

Future delivery goods purchased 
are smaller, and collections uniform- 
ly poor, but lately a marked change 
has been noted in a lessening of dif- 
ficulty in obtaining bank loans and 
in easing of interest rates. Condi- 
tions in the South, while slowly im- 
proving, still present a serious prob- 
lem. 

Many idle factories are reported 
as preparing to resume operations, 
and employees are being taken on 
where decreased forces have been 
working. 



High 

Grade 

Municipals 

Free from the expense and annoy- 
ance of the Federal 

Income Tax 

Byrne & 
McDonnell 



NEW YORK, NEWARK, 
SAN FRANCISCO 



Merchants Exhange Bldg. 
San Francisco, California 



The German Savings 
and Loan Society 

(THE GERMAN BANK) 
Savings Commercial 

Incorporated 1868 
526 California Street San Francisco 

Cal. 

Member of the Associated Savings 

Banks of San Francisco. 



The following Branches for Receipt 
and Payment of Deposits only : 
Mission Branch, S. E. corner Mission 

and 21st Streets. 
Richmond District Branch, S. W. cor- 
ner Clement and 7th Ave. 
Haight Street Branch, S. W. corner 
Haight and Belvedere. 

June 30th, 1914: 

Assets $58,656,635.13 

Capital actually paid up 

in Cash 1,000,000.00 

Reserve and Contingent 

Funds 1,857,717.65 

Employees' Pension 

Fund 177,868.71 

Number of Depositors 66,367 



Office hours: 10 o'clock A. M. to 
3 o'clock P. M., except Saturdays to 
12 o'clock M. and Saturday eveningB 
from 6 o'clock P. M. to 8 o'clock P. 
M. for receipt of deposits only. 

For the 6 months ending June 
30th, 1914, a dividend to depositors 
of 4 per cent per annum was de- 
clared. 



Wells Fargo Nevada 
National Bank 

Of San Francisco 

Nevada Bank Building, 2 Montgomery St., 
N. E. Corner of Market St. 

Capital Paid Up $6,000,000.00 

Surplus & Undivided Profits 5,148,628.93 



Total $11,148,628.93 

OFFICEBS. 

Isaias W. Hellman, President 
I. W. Hellman, Jr., Vice-PraB. 
F L. Lipman, Vice-Pres 
James K Wilson, Vice-Prea. 
Frank B. King, Cashier. 
C. L. Jacobs, Assistant Cashier 
W. McGavin, Assistant Caahier 
C. L. Davis, Assistant Cashier 
A. D. Oliver, Assistant Cashier 
A. B. Price, Assistant Cashier 
DIRECTORS. 

Iaaias W. Hellman 

Joseph SIobs 

Percy T Morgan 

F. W. Van Sicklen 

Wm F. Herr in 

John C. Kirkpatrick 

J. Henry Meyer 

A. H Payson 



I. W. Hellman, Jr. 
A. ChristeBon 
Wm. Haas 
Hartland Law 
Henry Rosenfeld 
James L. Flood 
Chas. J. Deering 
James K Wilson 



F L. Lipman 
ACCOUNTS INVITED 
Prompt Service, Courteous Attention, Un- 
excelled Facilities. 
SAFE DEPOSIT VAULTS 



Saturday, January 9, \'H~i. 



THE WASP 



13 




Prominent German-Americans ol 
Ban Francisco arc busy tliis week 
uith arrangements for the organiza- 
tion of a club which they say is to 
bave a membership of more than 
1,000. As yet plans arc only tenta- 
tive and the name of the organiza- 
tion has not even been decided. 

Permanent quarters will be ob- 
tained by the new club in [the 
German House and there will lie an 
extensive library ana! other advan- 
tages. The purposes and activities 
of the club will bo many. It will 
be a literary, social, dramatic and 
musical organization, and as its 
members will include many who 
can lead each of these activities, it 
is expected that the club's work 
will prove highly successful. 

Further arrangements will be 
made at a meeting early next week. 
# * * * 

Saint Valentine's Day will be ob- 
served by the Press Club witli an 
elaborate Valentine party, to take 
place Saturday evening. February 
IS. Already those in charge of ar- 
rangements have hit upon a num- 
ber of novel ideas and a jolly time, 
I- anticipated. 

The surprise of the New Year's eve 
entertainment came when it was an- 
nounced that E. .7. Fitzpatriek, one 
Of the "old guard," was about to 
become a benedict. At once he be- 
eame the recipient of congratula- 
tions from his friends and toasts 
were offered by the surprised ones. 
Fitzpatriek is a former newspaper 
man and a member of the Press 
Club's entertainment committee. 

* * -» * 

Founders' Day was observed last 
Saturday by the California Club 




MEDICINAL MINERAL 

A Proven Natural Remedy for 

Rbeamatbm, Catarrh, Stomach Trouble 
Di* betes, Bright' 8 Disease. Piles 

Eczema, Ulcers, Poison Oak 

Sold by All Loading Druggiptu 



SOCIETY'S NEWEST 

Qkis is to let tilt readers of/Ae Wasp 
know about socielys newest member— 

SAwrgyrWSPECIAL 
BRUSH-END Cigarettes 

Ultra-individual, and rather expensive . 
Nlade entirely by hand and separately 
wrapped tn silver foil to preserve fresh- 
ness andjlavor. J\t clubs and 
the better stands - 23c. 



wii'i elaborate ceremonies, attended 

by more than 300 members ol that 
01 ionization. 

Literary anil musical numbers 
made up a clever program of enter- 
tainment, presided over by .Mr-. 1). 

.1. McMaster, president of the club. 

Addresses were made by Mrs. LovcU 
White. Mrs. .lames W. Orr. .Mrs. l.o- 

ren Barnes and others. 

Interesting travelogues on Eu- 
rope were given at a meeting of the 
club Tuesday afternoon. 

-:;■ ■:; : ■:;- 

A brilliant dance at the Concor- 
dia Club last Sunday evening was 

enjoyed by many guests. A num- 
ber of dinner parties preceded the 
ball and much merriment was in- 
dulged in by the diners. Among 
those who presided over dinner par- 
tics were .Mr. and Mrs. p. I. Jacoby, 
Mr. ami Mrs. Otto Irving Wise, Mr. 
and Mrs. B. Liebes, and Mr and 
Mis. Max Plum. 

* * * * 

A number of dinner parties made 
things merry at the Menlo Golf 
and Country Club last Saturday. 
Many of the hosts and their guests 
indulged in golf during the day. 

Many novel and clever entertain- 
ment features were introduced at 
the holiday festivities of the To 
Kalon Club on Tuesday. The affair 
was for members only, and the orig- 
inality displayed was said by mem- 
bers to be greater than anything 
they ever had seen before. The cele- 
bration took the form of a fashion 
show. 

■x- * * -x- 

Holiday spirit reigned supreme at 
the festivities which took place last 
Saturday at the Burlingame Club. 
Prominent society belles and ma- 
trons of the peninsula were present. 
Many beautiful gowns added to the 
beauty of the scene and the flair 
proved an unusually jolly one. 

*• -X- -X- -X- 

The Riding and Driving Club of 
San Francisco Jield its holiday par- 
ty last Tuesday evening with many 
prominent men and women in at- 
tendance. Many members of the 
smart set were present. 

In accord with its annual custom, 
the Grizzly Bear Club, which con- 
sists of members of the San Fran- 
cisco parlors of the Native Sons of 
the Golden West, celebrated New 
Year's eve with a merry entertain- 
ment in the Native Sons building. 

An attractive program was pre- 
sented and the members declared 
the affair to be unusually merry. 
Following are the officers of the 
club: H. G. W. Dinkelspiel, presi- 



dent; Judge James G. (onion, vice- 
president: Edward J. Barton, treas- 
urer, and Edward Tietjen, secretary. 

# # # * 

The Bercsford club was the scene 

of much revelry on New Veal's eve. 
when prominent San Francisco so- 
ciety folk enjoyed an exi ilingly 

smart entertainment and partici- 
pated in other forms of merry-mak- 
ing. 
One feature of the affair was the 

presentation of a playlet which 
took the nature of a minstrel show. 

It was arranged by Mrs. Sidney 
Ehrman, with the aid of Mis, Otto 

Irving Wise and Frank Mandel. the 

well-known playwright. 

Sidney Ehrman acted as inter- 
locutor. 

A number of other clever features 
were presented and dancing 
brought the festivities to a gay fin- 
ale. 



Ins and Outs of the Social World 
(Cont. from Page 5) 

dansant given by Mr. and Mrs. M. 
H. de Young in honor of their 
daughter Phyllis. The De Youngs 
have numerous friends who might 
at any time make a very good live- 
lihood on the Orpheum circuit or 
even light opera, and they just de- 
light in parties at which their tal- 
ent is allowed to shine. 

One of the numbers which met 
with great applause was the little 
song and dance done by Mrs. Vin- 
cent Whitney as Pearl Sanders. 
Mrs. Whitney has always taken 
part in amateur performances and 
has no small ability. She sang a 
son?: entitled, "All the Girls Are 
Lovely By the Seaside," and she 
made a most fascinating picture in 
a fluffy gown of white satin and 
silver, a large white picture hat and 
a big French sun shade caught up 
with pink roses. 

Mrs. Ethel Hager Kellogg [and 
Billy Smith brought down roars of 
laughter in a skit entitled 
"Poor Pauline." Smith and Mrs. 
Kellog rather reminded one of 
Mutt and Jeff as regards height. 
The dainty little hostess herself 
added to the evening's enjoyment 
by doing a number of clever exhibi- 
tion dances with Quentin Tod as 
her partner. 

Several of the younger maids were 
cigarette girls, while about the floor 
wandered a German band, led by 
Joe Redding, and several bands of 
singers comprised of young society 
matrons and men. 

-X- -X- * -X- 

Miss Virginia Jollifle, who is one 
of the most striking of the older 
girls in the ultra smart set, is wear- 



Select Assort- 
ment of fine 
candies and 
patisserie. 



Telephones 

Douglas 3266 
Douglas 3267 




French Cohfectionek/ 



Ice cream to 
order. Wedding 
cakes and 
cream cakes a 
specialty. 

********** 




211 Powell Street 
San Francisco, California 



ing a stunning cloth suit of Ox- 
ford gray which is -t exeedingly 

becoming to her. The coat is me- 
dium in length and is bound all 
around with black silk braid and 
the skirt is one of the new full 
riffling ones. 

Little Miss Helen Crocker, who is 
out here from her school in New 
York, is a typical "sweet young 
maid" type, wearing severely plain 
flocks, and her hair pleated down 
her back. The Crockers dislike os- 
tentations of any kind and both 
the gills arc extremely simple in 
their tastes. 

Mrs. Horace Hill, whose son, 
young Horace, married Jeanne i.al 
lors, is very smart in a gown of 
brown duotyne in tan with which 
she is wearing an extremely chic 
brown velvet toque. 



At the St. Francis Bar 
Blobbs: Funny duck, this Rev. 
Browne who ran away with another 
man's wife and assumes blame 
when she commits suicide. Rum 
luck, I should say. 

Dobbs: What can you expect? 
He was a Prohibitionist. All those 
fellows have a bug somewhere. 

■X- -X- * -X- 

"A greasy, grimy hobo named 
James A. McPherson wandered in- 
to our office yesterday. He claimed 
that he was formerly a resident of 
this town and that while he was 
here he had worked for a living. 
This seemed a 'remarkable stata- 
ment, so we had our reporter inter- 
view him. 

" 'You say you lived in Bung- 
town?' asked the reporter. 

" 'Yes,' answered the tramp: 'many 
of the happiest moments of my life 
were spent here.' 

" 'What was your business, Mr. 
McPherson." 

" 'I was a reporter on the "Ban- 
ner." ' 

" 'To what do you attribute your 
remarkable rise in the world since 
then?' " 



For Health, Strength 

Damiana Bitters 

Naber, Alfs & Brune, Agents. 

935 HOW ABO BTBEET 

Opposite New Montgomery Street 



WANTED ! 

Diamonds Pearls 

HIGHEST CASH VALUE PAID 

PAWN TICKETS' BOUGHT 

Phil. Schuman, Whitney Bldg., 133 

Geary Street, Boom 524. 

Tel. Douglas 4125. 



a\MI«'UIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIINI!^\M%^\\1 IIIUIIIIIIIIIII!III% 

1 Phone Douglas 4393 

1 MME. H. E. EURDELL, Corsetlere. §j 

1 THE CORSET SHOP 1 

= EXCLUSIVE AGENTS W 

§ i 

S BEIN JOLIE, LA PKOTCESSE and = 

HENDERSON CORSETS. f 



m 210 Stockton St,, t>et. Geary & Post 
|l San Francisco. 

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14 



THE WASP 



Saturday, January 9, 1915 




BECflAU : TAVERN. 



Cor. Eddy and Powell Sts. 
Phone Douglas 4700 

A HIGH-CLASS 
FAMILY CAFE 

Where patrons are constantly surrounded 

by an air of refinement and respectability 

Informal Dansaut Every Evening 1 at 

Mine Except Sunday 

Under the management of 

A. C. MORRISSON 



nuiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiMiiiiiiiiiniiiiiniiiiiiiniiiiiuu 



Portola-Louvre 

RESTAURANT 

Powell at Market Sts. 

O. O. Swanberg, Pres. and 
Gen. Mgr. 
J, E. Alexander. Mgr. 
After Theatre 
Supper and 
Dansant 

Wednesday \ 

and Friday 
<S Evenings at 9:* 
^ A Glimpse 
into Bohemia. 
Entertainment 
Dining 

PORTOLA- 
LOUVRE 

The Temple of 
San Francisco's 
Gaiety. 




iiuiiiii imi hmiiii niiiMiniMiiniiTiirrHinrr 



J.-B. Pon J. Bergez 0. Lalanne 
0. Mailhebuau L. Coutard 


IjH Bergez -Frank's 

JHb" Poodle Dog.. 

W&W Hotel Co. 
P*~}g$Sk$ Restaurant 


Music and Entertainment Eyery Evening 


416-121 BUSH STREET 

(Above Kearny) 

SAN FRANOISOO, OAL. 

Exchange Douglas 2411 



FEDERAL CLUB 

32 TUEK STREET 

San Francisco's Popular Rendezvous 

for Sportsmen 

Dance Hall Buffet 




New York has the latest in the 
game of golf. No more are the de- 
votees of the sport dependent upon 
the weather because an indoor game 
has been invented. It is stated in 
a dispatch from the metropolis that 
the hotels and restaurants are hav- 
ing indoor courses installed. There 
can be no long satisfying drives of 
three hundred yards made, but the 
players can have the pleasure of 
swinging at the ball. 

The innovation is welcomed by 
amateurs and those who have gone 
a little stale. They claim that sev- 
everal weeks' practice at the indoor 
practice places them back on their 
game. Of the several courses al- 
ready installed the nine hole put- 
ting green is the most popular. 
The space occupied by this takes 
up only thirty feet. To keep the ball 
on the true course a special woven 
carpet with a heavy nap is laid, 
and around the holes a very fine 
sand is spread. To give the lay-out 
a golfy appearance a painted out- 
door scene is furnished as a back- 
ground. Practice facilities are al- 
most perfect as the course is sur- 
rounded with mirrors so the play- 
ers can see his mistakes and correct 
them. 



The advent of 1915 was heralded 
with much revelry, while dancing 
and music added to the merriment 
of the merry parties. 

* * # * 

G. R. Elliott and H. Friedman, of 
this city, each presided over gay 
parties, while W. A. Sherman was 
host to another merry group. 

Among the out-of-town folks who 
entertained friends there were Dr. 
S. B. Rice, of Dixon, and J. B. 
Spanchower, of Stockton. 

Scores of other gay parties also 
shared in the merriment at the 
Portola-Louvre. 



lrHllll!lllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllNIIIIIIIIIIIIIHIII = 



* * * * 



The new years day tournament at 
Del Monte resulted in a complete 
surprise when a college boy, Louis 
Sloss, Jr. won out in the finals. In 
the final match he defeated R. P. 
Tisdalc of the Seattle Golf Club, 
three up and two to play. 
* * * * 

In the second flight W. F. Cristo 
a Presidio Club Golfer won against 
Eli H. Weil, three up and two to 
play. There were many reversals of 
form in the New Years day play. 
Hubert E. Law, formerly Miss Alice 
Warner, was not in form and lost 
to Mrs. E. H. Weil. 



CAFE NOTES 

The Odeon Cafe was the scene of 
a number of brilliant little supper 
parties following the ball given Fri- 
day evening by the Deutscher Club 
last Friday /evening. The parties 
were informal, but nevertheless 
quite enjoyable. 

* * * * 

Members of the Outspoken Club, 
consisting of local merchants, met 
at a luncheon at the Odeon Wed- 
nesday afternoon to discuss cur- 
rent matters. 

* * * * 

Scores of dinner and supper par- 
ties shared in the festivities at the 
Portola-Louvre on New Year's eve. 



Who is to Succeed the Late 
Archbishop 

With the obsequies of the late 
Archbishop Riordan over, discus- 
sion is running toward the iden- 
tity of his successor in office. Hope 
is father to the belief in San Fran- 
cisco that Bishop Hanna, who has 
held the office of Vicar of the Arch- 
diocese since he came here from 
New York, will be honored. But 
there is no certainty that those 
bishops who will gather sometime 
soon to name the "dignus, dignior, 
dignissimus" will all settle upon 
Bishop Hanna as the man who 
shall succeed the departed prelate 
as head of this great division of 
the church. 

Down in Los Angeles there is an 
indication that Southern church 
peple would like to see Bishop 
Conaty elevated to the higher hon- 
or of Archbishop as a reward for 
his long service for the church in 
that section of the state. 

For twelve years Bishop Conaty 
has administered the affairs of the 
Bishopric of Los Angeles and 
Monterey and in that time has en- 
deared himself to the members of 
his numerous flocks, who would 
take a personal pride in his eleva- 
tion. 

The Graphic of Los Angeles 
speaks hopefully of the possibility, 
at the same time regretfully speak- 
ing of the loss to the south, should 
the "promotion" be effected. "San 
Francisco will have occasion to fe- 
licitate herself if, in the course of 
events, it shall transpire that this 
most attractive churchman — and we 
who voice this opinion are not of 
his Faith — is called to succeed the 
eminent prelate recently deceased. 
But while such elevation would be 
in every way worthy and fitting, we 
of Los Angeles would find it hard 
to reconcile ourselves to his depart- 
ure." 

***** 

Concerning Gibb's Special 

Ninteen fifteen is to be the won- 
der year for California, With the 
combined with the Panama Pacific 
Exposition, this state will experi- 
ence a remarkable year of prosper- 
ity. "Made in California" products 
like Gibb's Special will continue in 
favor with the public, for now that 
they have been given fair trial, they 
will continue to reign favorite. 
Those who know say that there is 
not a better liquor made than 
Gibbs Special. 




The Mark of the Candy of Character = 



Y'Small Blacks"! 

S A COFFEE CONFECTION g 

B Half As Sweet As Other Candy g 

S Afore Than Twice As Good = 

1 10c, 50c and $1 PACKAGES § 



1 The Golden Pheasant | 

| 32-36 GEARY STREET J 

IllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllHlllllllllllllllllllllllllllllj 




IM/naw 



HOTEL AND RESTAURANT 
64 - 66 ElUs Street 



Our Cooking Will Meet Tour Taste. Our 
Prices Will Please Tom. 



The New 

POODLE DOG 




HOTEL & RESTAURANT 

WILL REMAIN AT CORNER 

POLK and POST 

SAN FRANCISCO 
Telephones: Franklin 2960; Homo C 6705 



Pearl Oyster House 

Phone Douglas 4788 

FISH AND SHELLFISH 

In All It. Varieties 
Pine-St. Entrance, California Market 



«<~:^:~:~k~m~:~:~:~:-:~:~:-:":~:~>. 
•5* 

♦:• Phone China 571 

X 



* X 

\ ShanghaiLow I 

X v 

X Chop Suey and Noodles X 

A Furnishes the Very Best Chop ♦*♦ 

♦*♦ Suey and Oriental Dishes in the ,*, 

A Finest Home like Dining 1 Boom in X 

A the City. i 

•$• First Class Service, Special Rooms y 



for Ladies 

532 GRANT AVENUE $ 



X Between CaUfornia ana Pine Sts. X 



Saturday. January ft, 1915. 

Nerve Plus An Automobile 

Nerve and an automobile combin- 
ed a few days ago in providing an 
exciting afternoon for Waldemar de 
Bille, globe trotter and soldier of 
fortune, as well as increasing the 
troubles of the traffic cops. As for 
the friends who once had occupied 
the auto, they soon became side- 
walk spectators, leaving the ama- 
teur chauffeur to paddle his own 
canoe— or rather, to run his own 
car. 

The adventure started when De 
Billc took a few friends to see the 
machine he had just purchased. It 
was outside a garage and De Bille 
expected the demonstrator. 

"(five us a ride," asked the friends, 
not knowing that he scarcely knew 
the difference between the spark 
plug and the axle. 

Now De Bille was not to lose 
nerve at this complication. Sheer 
nerve had pulled him through 
more serious situations. Once it 
had put him in command of a Nica- 
raguan regiment in the army of 
General Zelaya. On another ocasion 
it had made him a hunter of big 
game in the Rockies. The mere mat- 
ter of knowing nothing about an 
automobile did not bother him. 

"Jump in," he said to his friends, 
and they did. Then he turned lev- 
ers until the machine started. All 
went well for a few moments. 
Climbing a hill, the machine stop- 
ped. Dte Bille couldn't make it go 
on. His friends jumped out." 

Suddenly the machine lurched 
forward, then started backward 
down the hill. A few more manipu- 
lations of levers, and the machine 
was going smoothly again. The 
friends followed on the sidewalk. 

Down Powell street into Market 
went De Bille. In front of a street 
car the machine turned, only to 
stop stock still. The motorman 
clanged his bell. De Bille called to 
a passerby to crank the machine. 
The auto went on. An instant 
later, it stopped. 

"You're on the wrong side of the 
street," shouted a traffic cop. De 
Bille looked but couldn't start the 
machine. The policeman descended 
f rom his mound and cranked the 
auto. Again it went on, only to 
stop another time before a street 
car. 

Once more a traffic cop hurried to 
the rescue, but this time a friend 
came to De Billc's aid and drove 
the car back to the garage. 



THE WASP 



15 



A Game, Anyway 

It was during a golf game in Scot- 
land. The first player who drove 
off was very bow-legged. The second 
player, unmindful that his oppon- 
ent was directly in front of him, 
struck the ball and it whizzed be- 
tween his opponent's legs. 

"Hoot, mon," said the bow-legged 
one in anger, "that's nae golf!" 

"Aweel," said his opponent com- 
placently, "ef 'tis nae golf 'tis gude 
croquet." 




THINGS 
WE 
SHOULDN'T 
KNOW 



"Who Is Sylvia?" 

Who was the society lady who, 
after much manoeuvering gained an 
audience with John McCormick, the 
Irish tenor, at his hotel, and at 
once proceeded to tell him of her 
unbounded admiration, not only 
for his voice but for the attractive- 
ness of his person? No, she is not 
so young, and she was once consid- 
ered a beauty. If necessary, we 
could state the number of her shoe, 
but having a leaning toward senti- 
ment of various colors, we will mere- 
ly add that she is married. As 
John- McCormaek is married too, 
and, it is said, very much in love 
with his wife, temptation must at 
least be under thirty to make his 
heart beat faster. Our information 



Qi 



Easy Money 

Truly, old and near-old gentle- 
men, are in perpetual danger. Not 
from holdups, pickpockets, book- 
agents or gout, but from much 
more insidious workers. That is, 
from young maidens who fall in 
love with them. 

Marvellous is the love that is gen- 
erated from a knowledge of the 
depths of your purse. Touching— 
in more ways than one— is the ten- 
derness a young woman can show 
towards an elderly gentleman pos- 
sessed of mazuma, motors and a 
mushy disposition. 

Lightning "romances" — for there 
is romance in money, you know — 
introductions in the afternoon, 
wedding bells at nightfall, arc 
among the possibilities when a gay 
old blade of fifty and aspiring 
maid of twenty meet and exchange 
glances, his at her face and figure, 
hers at his diamonds and evidences 
of wealth. 

It is fine to see courts that are 
not befooled. One would annex the 
gold of the late Col. Hayes, whose 
wife she was for a very brief period. 
Hers was, apparently, one of those 
marriages of a moment. She prom- 
ised to marry him about three 
hundred minutes after she first met 
him. And they "rowed" on their 
wedding night. 

The real reason of her marriage 
came out only after his death, for 
then she put in her bid for a large 
portion of his fortune. But an ear- 
lier and more proper wife, although 
divorced, put in an appearance 
with her child, and a balanced 
judge awarded her the money. Thus 
was one fortune-hunter denied easy 
money. 



A Trivial Little Fee 

There were few attending the bar 
examinations, held recently before 
the Appellate Court, who were able 
to catch the flying bits of humor 
that occasionally dispersed for a 
moment the sombre clouds of un- 
certainty veiling the courtroom. For 
to the majority present, the examin- 
ations held only anxiety and grave 
doubts. 

But the few who were not vitally 
interested caught an occasional bit 
of humor that served well to vary 
the monotony of the prolonged ex- 
aminations. One such remark that 
relieved for an instant the tenseness 
of the occasion was when Judge 
Frank H. Kerrigan asked a young 
law student the meaning of "fee 
simple." The Judge expected an ex- 
planation that this meant absolute 
title or ownership of a thing. 

The student, perplexed, twitched 
his fingers nervously, stuttered a 
moment, and replied, "Oh, well — er, 
it's just a simple little fee, you 
know, about $5 or $10." 



The visit of William G. McAdoo, 
Secretary of the Treasury, and Mrs. 
McAdoo to San Francisco and the 
Exposition has caused quite a stir 
this frosty season. Mrs. McAdoo is 
an exceedingly charming woman, 
and both she and her husband are 
pleasantly democratic. In this con- 
nection it would appear that the 
Japanese gentleman who has in 
charge the beautiful concession of 
the Japanese village is somewhat of 
a marvel in the matter of managing 
a compliment. To Mr. McAdoo he 
said: "Ah, yes, you are a great man 
very well called. Your name is cor- 
rectly pronounced 'Mikado,' is it 
not, to be sure." 



Eames Tricycle Co. 




Manufacturers of INVA- 
LID ROLLING CHAIRS 
for all purposes. Self 
PropellingTricycle Chairs 
for the disabled. INVA- 
LID CHAIRS. Whole 
sale and retail and for 
rent. 1714 Market St., 
San Francisco. Phone 
Park 2940. 1200 S. 
Main St., Loi Angeles. 



When You Say 
"Good Bye" 



comes not from him, of course. But 
some women will confide in each 
other. 




lemember the quality of 
your Baggage means as 
Much to You as do the 
smart clothes you wear. 

Since 1867 we have 
been making right here 
in San Francisco smart 
Baggage for our Smart 
People. 

Our Fibre - Covered 
Wardrobe Trunks are 
meeting the approval 
of the most particular 
traveling public. 

SMART BACCACE FOR 
FORTY-SEVEN YEARS. 




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|S Telephone Kearny 5756 

I Amber & Elson 

I 

p "Uailors and Smporiers 

% S3 NEW MONTGOMERY ST. 

& (Opposite Palace Hotel Entrance.) 

(£ San Francisco, Cal. a 

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PHONE DOUGLAS 4752 



BLAKE'S 



PHOTO STUDIO 

Smart Posing- — Latest Styles 
Popular Prices 



101 GEARY STREET 



PARAGON BUILDING SAN FRANCISCO 

Satisfaction Guaranteed 



WALTERS SURGICAL CO. 

SURGICAL INSTRUMENTS 
393 Sutter St., S. F. Phone Douglai 4011 



INSTITUTE or 
AT HOME 



NEAL 



TREATMENT 
FOR 



DRINK or DRUGS 

No hypodermic injections. Modern methods, 
no bad after-effects. Utmost privacy. For full 
particulars, address: 

NEAL INSTITUTE 

1409 SUTTER STREET, SAN FRANCISCO. 

Telephone Franklin 1098. 

Sixty Neal Institutes in the United States 

and Oanada. 



16 



tfHE WASP 



Saturday, January 9, 1915 




CORT 

Showing war as it really is, the. 
great film taken by Edward F. 
Weigle, staff photographer of the 
Chicago Tribune, will be shown lor 
the first time in this city at the Cort 
Theatre for a single week only, be- 
ginning Sunday, January 10. These 
wonderful Belgian War Pictures 
will be shown continuously from 
II A. M. to 11 P. M. 

Pifty per cent of the profits from 
the exhibition go to the Bel- 
gian Bed Cross Fund, and these 
pictures are the only ones taken 
with the authorization of the Bel- 
gian Government. 

Starting with a panorama of Ant- 
werp, the pictures show the ad- 
vance of the Fatherland's warriors 
and the final evacuation of the city. 
The battles of Termonde, Alost, Ma- 
lines and Lierre are flashed on the 
screen with terrible reality. Houses 
are blown up, shells fall amid the 
scattered ruins and complete the 
havoc. It is all uncannily real and 
makes for a wonderful object les- 
son. 

Everywhere are seen the alert Red 
Cross nurses, many different na- 
tionalities working side by side. 
The women and children of Alost in 
all their wretchedness, with little 
bundles of clothing, are seen re- 
treating down the railroad tracks 
as the shells burst through the 
roofs of their homes a few feet be- 
hind them. 

Only the dogs which draw the 
machine guns of the Belgians seem 
not to realize the terribleness of 
war. The photographer caught the 
dog battery teams as they lay in 
the rear of the fighting line resting, 
after dragging the guns into place, 
or swiftly galloping along with the 
machines to a new stand. 

The great scenes of war are shown: 
the flooding of Lierre; the capture 
- of Antwerp; the long, long proces- 
sion of refugees entering Holland: 
the utter destruction of Malines; 
the march of the Belgian cavalry. In 
all its ghastly significance the hor- 
rors of the great European war are 
truthfully depicted. 

Forbes-Robertson will be seen for 
the last time tonight at the Cort in 
"Passing of the Third Floor Back". 
"Today", the vivid, vital play of 
New York life, comes on Sunday, 
January 17. 



ORPHEUM 

The Orpheum announces another 
splendid and novel show for next 
week. 

Joseph Santley, who will be re- 
membered as the successful star of 



"When Dreams Come True" will 
head the bill. Mr. Santley will in- 
troduce the ball room dances which 
he created such a sensation in and 
will also contribute several songs. 
He will be assisted by Ruth Ran- 
dall and Josephine Kernell. 

That clever singing comedian, 
Frederick V. Bowers, who was suc- 
cessfully featured with "the Sweet- 
est Girl in Paris" and Mclntyre and 
Heath, and is also the composer of 
many song hits will present an act 
called "Bright Smiles and Bright 
Songs" in which he will have the 
aid of Ada Ripel, Robert "Mose" 
Burks and Charles Jones, dancers, 
with Oscar Frederickson as conduc- 
tor. . 

George McKay and Ottie Ardine 
call their skit "On Broadway". It 



is composed of bright patter and 
distinctive songs which are given in 
a fresh and breezy style that com- 
pels popularity. 

Charles F. Semon, "The Narrow 
Fellow," who is both comedian and 
musician may be relied upon for a 
diverting act. 

Hal and Frances a remarkably 
clever team will divert with the 
song skit "The Stock Farm." 

Rebla, juggler and pantomimist, 
who works with a sangfroid that is 
particularly appealing will make 
his first appearance in this city. He 
is lately from Europe, where he is 
highly thought of. 

The only holdovers will be- the 
Avon Comedy Four and The Bell 
Family of nine in their superb mus- 
ical act. 

•K -x- # -X- 

"Today" Coming 
"Today," the vivid, vital play of 
New York life, by George Broad- 
hurst and Abraham Schomer, is on 
its way to the Cort, where it will 
be unfolded on Sunday night, Jan- 
uary 17. The success and general 
appeal of the play is indicated by 
the fact that it ran for an entire 
year last season in Gotham. It is 
said to be a nicely balanced com- 




Alcazar 

PHONE KEARNY 2 
Matinees Thursday and Saturdays 

Alessandro Bevani 
Opera Company 

Week of January 11th — Monday and 
Sunday Nights, Saturday Matinee — "UN 
BALLO IN MASCHERA." Tuesday, 
Thursday nights, Saturday Matinee — 
"CARMEN." Wednesday, Friday and 
Sunday nights — "RIGOLETTO." 

PRICES NIGHTS — 50c, $1., $1.50, $2.00 
MATINEES — 50c and $1.00 



<K£ 



LEADING 

THEATRE 

Ellis and Market 



Phone Sutter 2400 



Last Time Saturday N"ig"ht 

FORBES ROBERTSON 

In "Passing" of the Third Floor Back" 



Beginning: Sunday, January 10 th — One 

Week Only Continuous — 11 a. m. to 

11 p. m. — All seats 25c. 

The Chicago Tribune 

BELGIAN WAR PICTURES 

The Only Authentic Pictures of the 

Oreat European Conflict Ever Produced. 

50 per cent Profits go to Belgian Red 

Cross. 



NEXT ATTRACTION— Beginning Sun- 
day, Jan. 17th — "TODAY" with 
Arthur Byron 



Safest and Moat Magnificent Theatre in 
America, 



Week Beginning* this Sunday afternoon 
(Matinee Every Day.) 



A WONDERFUL iVEW BII.T, 

JOSEPH SANTLEY, late star of 
"When Dreams Come True" assisted by 
Ruth Randall and Josephine Kernell in 
"A Touch of Musical Comedy;" FRED- 
ERICK V. BOWERS & CO. ' Bright 
Smiles and Bright Songs;" McKAT & 
ARDINE "On Broadway;" HAL and 
FRANCES in "The Stock Farm;" CHAR- 
LES F. SEMON "The Narrow Fellow;" 
HEBLA The Unconcerned Juggler; THE 
AVON COMEDY FOUR. Last week 

THE BELL FAMILY, Nine Brothers 
and Sisters in an artistic musical offer- 
ing. 

Evening- Prices 10c, 25c, 50c, 75c. 

Matinee Prices (except Sundays and 

Holidays) 10c, 25c, 50c. 

PHONE DOUGLAS 70 



ONE RETURN CONCERT 




John 
McCormack 



"There Are So Many Lovely Scenes I n California I Would Like 
Paint,"— Forbes-Robertson 



to 



MAIL REQUESTS and ORDERS FOR 
TICKRTS to WILL L. GKEENBAtTM at 
Sherman Clay & Co.'s. 

Tickets $2.00, $1.50, and $1.00 

Next Wed. January 13th at Sherman 

Clay & Co.'s, Kohler and Chase's and 

Cort Theatre. 

STEHTWAY PIANO 

Sunday, Jan. 24th — S. P. Quintet Cluo 
Sunday Jan. 31, Alma Gluck 



Saturday, January 9, 1915. 

bination ol tragedy, pathos, comedy 
and realistic situationa it deals 

[or the most part with the present 
day craze for keeping up appear- 
ances and the attendant dangers. 

A notable <-a-t will be seen at the 
(nit, headed by Arthur Byron. 

* • • 4 

Alma Gluck 
On Sunday afternoon, January 31, 
Alma Gluck, the youngest of the 
world's great soprano, will niiike 

her Mist appearance on the Pacific 
Coast at the Columbia Theatre, un- 
der the direction of Will L. Qrcen- 
baum. 

Mine. Gluck is an artist in tem- 
perament similar to John McCor- 
mack's. Like the Irish tenor, she 
possesses that faculty of seeming to 
reach over the footlights and find 
the head, hand, and heart of every 
person in her audience, and there 
is no doubt that she is rapidly 
taking the place of the lamented 
.Mine." Nordica and Mine. Sembrich 
in the hearts of the music-lovers of 
this country. Mine. Gluck is still in 
her early twenties, so we are to hear 
her while the bloom of youth is still 
on her voice, and Mr. Greenbaum 
predicts that she will create as great 
a sensation here as even Sehumann- 
Ileink did when she first sang for 
us. 

Mail orders of the Alma Gluck 
concerts Sunday afternoon, Janu- 
ary 31 and February 7, will now be 
accepted, and it is possible that an 
evening concert may also be ar- 
ranged. The prices for Gluck will 
be $2.50 and $2.00 in the orchestra, 
$2.00, $1.50 and $1.00 in the balcony, 
and $1.00 in the gallery. 

Mine. Gluck will not sing in Oak- 
land this season. 

* * -X- -X- 

John McCormack Once More 
John McCormack, the great Irish 
tenor and the finest male concert 
singer now before the public, will 
give an extra concert at the Cort 
Theatre on Sunday afternoon, Janu- 
ary 17, at 2:30. At his last concert 
more than enough were turned 
away, unable to gain even standing 
room, to again fill the big theatre, 
and so Manager Greenbaum has 
given the artist a special induce- 
ment to change his routing and 
provide us another opportunity to 
hear his glorious voice. This will 
be the last chance to hear the tenor 
for at least two years, as his time 
is booked solid until 1917. 

The program will be a most beau- 
tiful one and special attention will 
be given to requested works. The 
main portion of the offering will be 
entirely different from his previous 
concerts, for MeCormack's repertoire 
is of wide extent. Among the spe- 
cial features will be the beautiful 
Handelian aria, "Waft Ye Angels," 
the ever-welcome aria, "Salve Di- 
mora" from Gounod's "Faust," and, 
by special request, the Schubert 
"Ave Maria." 

The old Irish gems will not be 
neglected, and among those prom- 
ised are "The Snowy Breasted Pearl" 
and "The Minstrel Boy." As soon 
as Manager Greenbaum has can- 
vassed the requests which are com- 



TIIE WASP 



ing in by the hundreds the com- 
plete pint; run i u ill be announced. 

The sale hi seats will open next 
Wednesday at Sherman and Clay, 
Kohler and Chase, and the Cort 

Theatre To avoid disappointment) 

all H liu wish to embrace this final 
opportunity of hearing the "master- 
singer" should secure their seats in 

good time, and Mrs. Greenbaum 
will pay special attention to all 
mail orders addressed to him to 
the box office at Sherman and clay. 



Lovers of chamber music will re- 
gret that the season of the San 
Francisco Quintet Club is soon to 
close. The final concert will be giv- 
en at the St. Francis Hotel on Sun- 
day afternoon, January 24, when 
works by Max Reger, Ernest Dohn- 
anyi and Johannes Brahms will be 
given. 



QUIBBLES OF QUINCE 

Comipg out of church after listen- 
ing to a sermon on "Married Life 
and Its Duties," two old Irishwo- 
men commented on the address. 

"It's a fine sermon his reverence 
would be after giving us," said one 
to the other. 

"It is, indeed," was the reply; 
"and I wish I knew as little about 
the matter as he does!" 



A young Irishman recently ap- 
plied for a job as life-saver at the 
municipal baths. 

As he was about six feet six inches 
high and well built, the chief life- 
saver gave him an application 
blank to fill out. 

"By the way," said the chief life- 
saver," can you swim?" 

"No," replied the applicant; "but 
I can wade like blazes!" 



PUCKETTS TWENTY FIRST 
ANNIVERSARY 

Nine hundred people participated 
in the twenty-flrst anniversary ball 
which occurred Friday night. Pro- 
fessor (.'. K. I'uckctt was the host 
for the occasion. The hall was 
beautifully decorated in evergreens 
ami pninsettias. Their was a ten- 
piece orchestra that furnished the 
music, with the added feature of 

a Hawaiian quartet which sang be- 
tween dances. Another interesting 
feature was the Sell illicit Moment 
.Musical given by three little girls. 




For twenty-one years Professor 
Puckett has been identified with 
San Francisco. His college of danc- 
ing has been part of the life of the 
city for two generations. The new 
hall which was built after the fire 
of 1906 is without doubt one of the 
finest of its kind in Central Califor- 
nia, and the twenty-one years that 
Professor Puckett has been in busi- 
ness Ln San Francisco have been 
twenty- one years of uninterrupted 
success. 





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17 

A new celebrity of the stage who 
lias arrived in New York is Miss 
Betty Nansen who plays the 
same roles in Denmark as Miss 
Julia Marlowe in this country. She 
will come tn San Francisco. 
# * * » 

The marriage of Henry Schuinann- 
llcink. son of the prima donna, in 
New Vnrk recently to Miss Elsie 
Straumann, a Patterson school 
teacher, mildly astonished Gotham. 

■:: ■;: -;:■ :: 

The latest dances of Vernon and 
Mrs. Castle is "Watch Your Step." 
They are at the Amsterdam, New 
Fork City. 



Miss Paull was one of the teachers 
at the Mission Sunday School. One 
Sunday the subject of the lesson 
was "The Second Commandment," 
and Miss Paull began by asking lit- 
tle Albert Dugan the question: — 

"Now, Albert, have we any idols 
in this country?" 

For a moment the boy hesitated, 
and then replied:— 

"Yes, ma'am. Me dad's idle, and 
me uncle too." 

PREMIER CONCERT 

World's Greatest Coloratura Soprano 
Mine. Bernice de 

PASQUALI 

COLUMBIA THEATBE 

Sunday, January 10th, 2:30 p. m. 

Prices: $2.00 — $1.50 — ?1.00 



ULTMOl 



;\B 



NEW YORK \ 

America's Latest and I 

J Most Refined and New | 

j York's Centermost Hotel 

| Only hotel occupying an entire city 

block, Vanderbiltand Madi 
1 43d and 44th Sts., adjoinin 
Central Terminal 

; 1000 rooms; 9.10 with bath— Ri 

l from J2.T.0 per day. Suites 

to 15 rooms for permauci 

paney. Large mid small b» 

V quct and din jug salons and 

specially arm need for j 

or private iuoctious 

v Custav Baumann, Pre 
^John McE.Bowr 
Vice-Pres 




Hermosillo Internacional Co. 

WHY 



MRS. W. F. LEWIS, 
Wife of Major Lewis of the Medical Corps, U. S. A. 




18 



THE WASP 



Saturday, January 9, 1915 



new; pape?r; 

SHOP. 




Rumor Says Earl Will Enter The 
Local Field 
For some weeks there has been a 
bit of underground gossip going 
the rounds to the effect that a new 
morning newspaper is to be started 
in San Francisco to take the place 
of the old Morning Call. After beat- 
ing about for a week or so without 
connecting with any name, the rum- 
or finally attached itself to the 
name and personality of E. T. Earl, 
now owner of the Tribune and Ex- 
press in Los Angeles. 

When nothing happened the no- 
tion of the new paper remained, 
but General Harrison Grey Otis of 
the Los Angeles Times was linked 
with it, as the proposed founder. It 
is not generally known, but it is a 
fact nevertheless, that about rive 
years ago a body of San Francisco 
capitalists, including some of the 
biggest men here, offered the Gener- 
al the sum of one million dollars if 
he would found a morning paper 
here which should start an anti- 
union-labor propaganda.. The hope 
was that the big and unafraid 
personality of the General would 
make a dent in the power wielded 
here by organized labor. The offer 
was not accepted as everyone 
knows, and probably never will be. 
For General Otis is growing old and 
even now is resting at his San Fer- 
nando Valley ranch to recuperate 
from a siege of general indisposi- 
tion. Besides, he is quite content 
with his Times property, which nets 
him nearly a million a year. 

If there is anything solid, there- 
fore, in the talk of a possible new 
addition to the morning field here, 
Earl is the most likely person to be 
behind it. His Tribune has been 
a losing proposition for a long time. 
About six months ago there was a 
"consolidation" of the staffs of his 
Express and Tribune under which 
a "staff-and-a-quarter" got out both 
papers. Each man did a bit of 
work for both papers, each man 
worked as long hours as are possi- 
ble, and each got only the usual 
salary. The scheme has been work- 
ing for some time. 

An addition to the list of newspa- 
pers here would be a Godsend to 
the writing fraternity, many of 
whom have been pacing the streets 
and city editors are having 
the devil's own time keeping with- 
in their appropriations and at the 
same time covering the news. 

There is a deep-down hope in 
many a scribe's heart that the ru- 
mor has foundation in fact. 



A Sentimental Dog 
Some men at the club were telling 
dog stories after a day's shooting. 
After some time, when the tales had 
got very "tall," one little man who 
had been quite silent, said: 

"I have a dog that makes all 
yours seem fools. I generally feed 
him myself after dinner, but the 
other day a friend dropped in and 
the poor animal slipped my mind. 
After the rneal we went into the 
garden. The dog scratched up a 
flower and laid it at my feet, with 
the most yearning look in his eyes — 
it was a forget-me-not." 

Nobody told any more dog stories 
that evening.— Tit-Bits. 



The Grand Buffet 
Frank J. Corr, proprietor of the 
Giand Buffet on New Montgomery 
Street, opposite the Palace Hotel, 
believes that prosperity is at last 
with us. The new year has started 
off in the future. The Grand Buffet 
is well patronized by guests of 
the Palace Hotel, who And in it all 
that could be desired. 




ASSOCIATED SAVINGS BANKS 
OF SAN FRANCISCO 
DIVIDEND NOTICES 



FRENCH-AMERICAN BANK OP SAV- 
INGS (Savings Department) — For the 
half year ending December 31, 1914. a 
dividend has been declared at the rate 
of four M) per cent per annum on all 
deposits, payable on and after Saturday, 
January 2, 1915, Dividends not called 
for are added to and bear the same rate 
of interest as the principal from Janu- 
ary 1, 1915. 

A. LEGALLET, President. 
Office — 108 Sutter Street. 

HUtlEOLET SAVINGS BANK, 783 
Market Street, near Pouxtn. — For the 
half year ending December 31, 1914, a 
dividend has been declared at the rate 
of four (4) per cent per annum on all 
savings deposits, payable on and after 
Saturday, January 2, 1915. Dividends 
not called for are added to and bear the 
same rate of interest as the principal 
from January 1, 1915. 
H. C. KLEVESAHL, Cashier. 

THE GERMAN SAVINGS AND LOAN 
SOCIETY, 526 California Street, San 
Francisco ; Mission Branch, corner Mis- 
sion and 21st Sts.; Richmond District 
Branch, corner Clement St. and 7th Ave.; 
Haight Street Branch, corner Haight 
and Belvedere Sts. — For the half year 
ending December 31, 1914, a dividend has 
been declared at the rate of four (4) per 
cent per annum on all deposits, payable 
on and after Saturday, January 2, 1915. 
Dividends not called for are added to 
the deposit account and earn dividends 
from January 1, 1915. 
GEORGE TOTJRXY, Manager. 

MUTUAL SAVINGS BANK OP SAN 
FRANCISCO, 70S Market Street, oppo- 
oite Third. — For the half year ending 
December 31, 1914, a dividend has been 
declared at the rate of four (4) per cent 
per annum on all savings deposits, pay- 
able on and after Saturday, January 
2, 1915. Deposits not called for are 
added to and bear the same rate of in- 
terest as the principal from January 1, 
1915. 

JAMES D. PHELAX, President. 
C. B. HOBSOX, Cashier. 

BANK OP ITALY, Southeast corner 
Montgomery and Clay Streets; Market 
Street Br&nch, junction Market, Turk 
and Mason Streets — For the half 3'ear 
ending December 31, 1914, a dividend 
has been declared at the rate of four 
(4) per cent per annum on all savings 
deposits, payable on and after Saturday, 
January 2, 1915. Dividends not called 
for are added to and bear the same rate 
of interest as the principal from Janu- 
ary 1, 1915. Money deposited on or be- 
fore January 11, 1915, will earn interest 
from January 1, 1915. 
L. SCATENA, President 

A. PEDPaNA, Cashier 

SECURITY SAVINGS BANK, 316 

Montgomery Street. — For the half year 
ending December 31, 1914, a dividend 
upon all deposits at the rate of four (4) 
per cent per annum -will be payable on 
and after January 2, 1915. 

S. L. ABBOT, Vice-President 



Tact ? 

Jones: Has she any tact? 

Bones: Tact? She's the kind of 
woman who'd send a wrist-watch to 
the Venus of Milo for a Christmas 
present. — Life. 

MONEY LOANED on Diamonds 
and Jewelry. 2 per cent per month. 
Columbia Loan Office, 3 Stockton 
street. Est. 1872 



Wedding Rings 
Soren4enG>: 

Watchmakers, Jewelers, Opticians. 
715 Market St, Nr. Third. 



LEGAL NOTICES. 

SUMMONS TO ESTABLISH TITLE 
IX THE SUPERIOR COURT of the 

State of California in and for the City 
and County of San Francisco. 
Action No. 35277. 
Gerald C. Halsey, Attorney for Plaintiff. 
HARLOW TV. CULVER and ELLA P. 
CULVER, his wife, Plaintiffs, 
vs. 
All persons claiming any interest in, or 
lien upon, the real property herein 

described or any part thereof, De- 
fendants. 

THE PEOPLE OF THE STATE OF 
CALIFORNIA: 

To all persons claiming any interest 
in, or lien upon, the real property here- 
in described or any part thereof, defend- 
ants, greeting: 

You are hereby required to appear 
and answer the complaint of HARLOW 
W. CULVER and ELLA F. CULVER. 
his wife, plaintiffs, filed with the Clerk 
of the above entitled Court and City and 
County, within three months after the 
first publication of this Summons, and 
to set forth what interest or lien, if any, 
you have in or upon that certain real 
property or any part thereof, situated 
in the City and County of San Francis- 
co. State of California, particularly de- 
scribed as follows: 

COMMENCING at a point on the 
Northerly line of Hayes Street distant 
thereon Two Hundred and Thirty-four 
f234) feet 4-% inches Westerly from 
the Westerly line of Baker Street; run- 
ning thence westerly and along said 
Northerly line of Hayes street Twenty- 
five (25) feet; thence at a right angle 
Northerly One Hundred and Thirty-sev- 
^n <1Z1) feet 6 inches; thence at a right 
angle Easterly twenty-five feet (25) 
feet; thence at a right angle Southerly 
One Hundred and Thirty-seven (137) 
feet 6 inches to the Northerly line of 
Hayes street and the point of com- 
mencement. 

BEING part of Western Addition 
Block No. 594. 

And you are hereby notified that, un- 
less you so appear and answer, the 
plaintiffs will apply to the Court for the 
relief demanded in the complaint, to- 
wit: That it be adjudged that the plain- 
tiffs are the owners of said property in 
fee simple as absolute; that their title 
to said property be established and 
quieted; that the Court ascertain and 
determine all estates, rights, titles, in- 
terests and claims in, and to said prop- 
erty, and every part thereof, whether 
the same be legal or equitable, present 
or future, vested or contingent, and 
whether the same consists of mortgages 
or liens of any description; that plain- 
tiffs recover their costs herein and have 
such other and further relief as may be 
meet in the premises. 

WITNESS my hand and the seal of 
said Court this 29th day of December, 
A. D., 1914. 

H. I. MULCREVY, Clerk. 
By S. I. Hughes, Deputy Clerk. 

The first publication of this summons 
was made in The Wasp newspaper on 
the 2nd day of January, A. D., 1915. 

The following persons are said to 
claim an interest in, or lien upon, said 
property adverse to plaintiff. 

Bank of Italy, a corporation, Mont- 
gomery and Clay Streets, San Francisco 
California. 

Gerald C. Halsey, Attorney for Plain- 
tiff-, Rooms 501-502-503 California-Pa- 
cific Building, 105 Montgomery Street, 
San Francisco, Cal. 



SUMMONS 
IN THE SUPERIOR COURT of the 
State of California, in and for the 
City and County of San Francisco. 
EDNA M. HEIN. Plaintiff, vs. PEDRO 
GARCIA and BON1TA GARCIA, his 
wife, defendant. Edward Lande, at- 
torney for plaintiff. 

No. 59413. Action brought in the Su- 
perior Court of the State of California 
in and for the City and County of San 
Francisco, and the complaint filed in the 
office of the County Clerk of said City 
and Countv. 

THE PEOPLE OF THE STATE OF 
CALIFORNIA SEND GREETINGS TO: 



Pedro Garcia and Bonita Garcia, his 
wife, defendants. 

YOU ARE HEREBY DIRECTED to 
appear and answer the complaint in an 
action entitled as above, brought against 
you in the Superior Court of the State 
of California, in and for the City and 
County of San Francisco, within ten 
days after the service on you of this 
alias summons — if served within this 
City and County; or within thirty days 
if served elsewhere. 

And you are hereby notified that un- 
less you appear and answer as above 
required, the said Plaintiff will take 
judgment for the money or damages de- 
manded in the complaint as arising upon 
contract or will apply to the Court for 
the relief demanded in the complaint. 

GIVEN under my hand and seal of 
the Superior Court at the City and Coun- 
ty of San Francisco, State of California, 
this 5th day of December. A. D. 1914. 

H. I. MULCREVY. Clerk. 
(SEAL) By H. Brunner, 

Deputy Clerk. 



CEBTIFICATE OP FABTNEESHIP TJN- 

DEE SECTION 2466 AND 2468 OF 
THE CIVIL CODE OF THE STATE 
OF CALIFORNIA. NO. 1988. 



KNOW ALL MEN BY THESE PRE- 
SENTS: That we, the undersigned, here- 
by give notice and certify that we are 
now and have been heretofore trans- 
acting and doing business as partners 
at No. 45 Twenty-Ninth street "in the 
City and Count}- of San Francisco, State 
of California, as a partnership under the 
firm name and style of SUNSET MAR- 
BLE & GRANITE MONUMENTAL 
WORKS, and that said partnership was 
formed on the 12th day of November. 
J914, and that the name in full of said 
partnership is SUNSET MARBLE & 
GRANITE MONUMENTAL WORKS 
and the names in full of all the mem- 
bers of said partnership and their places 
of residence are as foil ows : 

Chares Zambruno, 469 Valley Street, 
San Francisco, Cal. 

Felice Alchieri, No. 1008 Huron Ave. 
San Francisco, Cal. 

Dated, November 12th, 1914. 

CHARLES ZAMBRUNO 
FELICE ACHIERI 

STATE OF CALII ORIA 
City and County of San Francisco. 

On this 18th day of November. 1914, 
before me, Chas. F. Duisenberg, a Notary 
Public, ,in and for the said City and 
County of San Francisco, residing there- 
in, duly commissioned and sworn, per- 
sonally appeared CHARLES ZAMBRUNO 
and FELICE ALCHIERI, known to me 
to be the persons described in and 
who.se name*; are subscribed to the fore- 
going instrument, and they acknowledged 
to me that they executed the same. 

IN WITNESS WHEREOF. I have 
hereunto set my hand and affixed my of- 
ficial seal at my office, in said City and 
County of San Francisco, the day and 
year in this certificate first above writ- 
ten. Chas. F. Duisenberg. 

fSEAL) 
Notary Public in and for the City and 
County of San Francisco. State of Cali- 
fornia. 
Endorsed: 

Filed Nov. 19th. 1914. H. C. Mul- 
crevy, Clerk, by Milton M. Davis, Depu- 
ty Clerk. 

Gerald C. Halsey. Attorney-at-Law, 
105 Montgomery St., San Francisco, Cal. 



NOTICE TO CEEDITOES 

Estate of John Marx, deceased. 

Notice is hereby given by the under- 
signed administrator of the estate of 
John Marx, deceased, to the credit- 
ors of and all persons having claims 
against the said deceased, to exhibit 
them with the necessary vouchers with- 
in 4 months after the first publication 
of this notice to the said administrator 
at the office of M. J. Hynes, Public Ad- 
ministrator, 858 Phelan Building, San 
Francisco, California, which said office 
the undersigned selects as his place of 
business in all matters connected with 
said estate of John Marx, deceased. 

M. J. BTYNE.-. 
Administrator of the estate of John 

Marx, deceased- 
Dated, San Frincisco, October 30th, 1914. 



NOTICE TO CEEDITOES 
Estate of Adolph Giacometti, deceased. 

Notice is hereby given by the under- 
signed administrator of the estate of 
Adolph Giacometti, deceased, to the cred- 
itors of and all persons having claims 
against the said deceased, to exhibit 
them with the necessars' vouchers with- 
in 4 months after the first publication 
of this notice to the said administrator 
at the office of M. J. Hynes. Public Ad- 
ministrator, 858 Phelan Building, San 
Francisco, California, which said office 
the undersigned selects as his place of 
business in all matters connected with 
said estate of Adolph Giacometti, de- 
ceased. 

M, J. HYNES, 
Administrator of the estate of Adolph 

Giacometti, deceased. 
Dated, San Francisco, October 29, 1914. 



THE WASP 



LA GRANDE & WHITES 
LAUNDRY CO. 



Office and Works: 234 Twelfth St. 
Bet. Howard and Kolsom Sis. 

SAN FRANCISCO. - - CALIFORNIA 
Telephone Market 916 



Healthful Delicious Refreshing 

Drink Kinsner 

CALIFORNIA VICHY 

"Unexclled as a Bar or Table Water" 

Kinsner Mineral Springs Company 

Owners and Controllers, WilHts, Cal. 
TRY A KINSNER LEMONADE 

San Francisco Office: 

12th mid FOL&OM STREETS 
Phone Market 3054 



Send for Our Select List of 

EIGHTY CALIFORNIA PAPERS 

Y'Hi can insert Display 

Ad I iii the entire list for 

EIOHT DOLLARS AN INCH 

Dake Advertising Agency, Inc. 



432 S. MAIN ST. 
Los Angeles 



121 SECOND ST. 
San Francisco 



PATRICK & CO. 

RUBBER STAMPS 

STENCILS 
SEALS 

BADGES 
SIGNS, ETC. 
560 Market St. San Francisco 



SING CHONG CO 




BEAUTIFUL 

ORIENTAL 

BAZAAR 

Large Display 

of 

Presents 

at reasonable 

Prices. 

Satisfaction 

Guaranteed 

Packing and 

Delivery Free 

GRANT AVE. and 

CALIFORNIA STREET 

CHINATOWN 



£| Imported Champagnes are now giving way 

to the 

Italian Swiss Colony's 

Golden State 




Extra Dry CHAMPAGNE 




Produced at 
Asti, California 

At Cafes, Hotels, 
Wine Dealers 



San Francisco's Restaurant de Luxe 

Adjoining the Columbia Theatre 

You do not know this city until you have dined at FRED SOLARI'S, 
San Francisco's most palatial restaurant. World famous for its dis- 
tinctive cuisine and polite service. 

DANSANTS EVERY EVENING 
EXCEPT SUNDAY 
in main dining room, under direction of competent lady manager. A 
place of beauty and refinement and the right people about you. 

FRED SOLARi'S GRILL 

CORNER MASON AND GEARY STREETS 



STATEMENT OP THE CONDITION OP THE ■ ', 

Bank of Italy 



COMMERCIAL 



Associated Saving's Banks of San Francisco 
The San Francisco Clearing* House Association 

DECEMBER 31, 1914. 
ASSETS 

First Mortgage Loans on Real Estate $ 6 850,680,87 

Real Bstate, Bank Buildings, Furniture, Fact urea and Safe 

Deposit Vaults 864,9 

Time Loans (Collateral and Personal) 2,128,031 9 

Customers' Liability under Letters of Credit Ll9,9i 

l 'ther Assr Is 59,861 23 

United States, State, Municipal and other Bonds. $2,677,717.70 
Demand Loans (Collateral and Personal)..., 2,479,177.12 

CASH 2,850.110.07 8,007,00 1.89 

$18,030,401.59 

LIABILITIES 

Capital Paid Up ? \, -■><', uio 

surplus and Undivided Profits 350,211 is 

Dividends Unpaid 37,661 

Letters of Credit 1 1 9,966 28 

DEPOSITS 16,272,663.1 3 

$18,030,401.68 
THE STORY OF OUR GROWTH 

As shown by a Comparative Statement of Our Assets 

December 31, 1904 $ 285,436.97 

December 31, 1905 1,021,290.80 

December 31, 1906 1,899,947.28 

December 31, 1907 2,221,347.35 

December 31, 1908 2,574,004.90 

December 31, 1909 3,817,217.70 

December 31, 1910 6,539,861.47 

December 31, 1911 8,379,347.02 

December 31, 1912 11,228,814 56 

December 31, 1913 15,882,91ll61 

December 31, 1914 18,030,401.59 

Savings Deposits Made on or Before January 11th 
"Will Earn Interest From January 1st 

NUMBER OF DEPOSITORS 50,253 



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Another Invention Added to 
World's Achievements. 

It is the first time in the history of 
Bifocal Lenses that one has been pro- 
duced that is absolutely scientifically 
correct, all weak points being entirely 
overcome in this new and wonderful 
"Oneplece" Bifocal — made from one sol- 
id piece of clear white optical glass. 
Two pairs of glasses are unnecessary as 
reading and distance corrections are 
combined in one lens. There is no need 
now, of carrying around two pairs of 
glasses and wasting time changing from 
one pair to the other for reading or dis- 
tance as the case may be. This remark- 
able "Onepiece" Bifocal males with the 
world's greatest inventions. 

W. D. Fennimore ^ i | / / A. R. Fennimore 
" \ W. Duvia' / / . 



mm 




Paul Elder's 

Unique Book and Art Shop 

Known the world over 
anion? cultured people for 
its harmonious beauty 
and efficient service You 
will be cordially welcom- 
ed. 

Paul Elder and Company 

239 Grant Ave, San Francisco 



181 Post Street 
2508 Mission 



o. ' San Francisco 

1221 Broadway, Oakland 



Valuable Information 

Of a Business, Personal or Social Nature 

from the Prea of the 

Pacific Coast 

ALLEN'S 

Press Clipping Bureau 

88 riRST STREET 

SAN FRANCISCO, CALIFORNIA 
Telephone Kearny 892 



Sultan Turkish Baths 



624 POST STREET 

Special Department for Ladies 

Open Day and Night for Ladies and 
Gentlemen. 

Al. JohnHon, formerly of Sutter Street 
Hamniam has leased the Suttnn Turkish 
Balhs, where he will he glad to see his 
old and now customers. 



Office Houn 

9 a, m. to 5:20 p. m. 
Phone DousJm I S01 



Rearjcflce 
573 Fifth Avenue 
Hours 6 to 7:30 p. n 
Phone Padtc 275 



W. H. PYBURN 

NOTARY PUBLIC 

My Motto "ALWAYS IN" 
On parle Francaii Se liable Eipano 

Office: 229 Montgomery Street 

Smxt FrmncUco California 




Feather River Canyon -Royal Gorge 

ROUTE 



leams service 
Scenery Satisff action 



THE 

Distinctive San Francisco Route 

TICKET OFFICES: 
665 MARKET STREET 1326 BROADWAY, OAKLAND 

Phone Sutter 1651 Phone Oakland 132 

muiiiniiiiiiii mm mjjjffl lillllII[ ' ' Ill!l 

iniiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii mini %JlZ*f in "1111111111 iiiiiiiiiiiinii 



Golden State Limited 

VIA LOS ANGELES 

Chicago, St. Louis, 
Kansas City 

From San Francisco, Ferry Station 
6:00 P.M. DAILY 



Soothemni Pacific 

The Exposition Line — 1915 — First in Safety. 



>» fr ». M .. M .. I . M . M"H"M ' M ' H ' ** ' >* ' ! - ** - H 1 ^ 

Hibernia Bank STATEMENT Savings Bank Only 

of the Condition and Value of the Assets and Liabilities 
— OF— 

The Hibernia Savings and Loan Society 

DATED DECEMBER 31, 1914 

ASSETS -which is situated as aforesaid, and the payment there- 

1— Bonds of the United States ($5,305,000.00), of the ° f „ ?, s r f5S ur 5 a , o y ,, pl?a #,?i^ d rH po t h ^L on ,, / ?,* nd - s of 

. , *n i-x • j n-Z- j n i.- Railroad and Quasi-Public Corporations and other se- 

State of California and Cities and Counties curities. 

thereof ($5,961,725), of the State of New York 6— (a) Real Estate situated in the City and Coun- 

($1,899,000.00), the actual value of which is ..$13,839,582.40 county of San Francisco ($2,228,821,301, and 

2— Cash in Vault 3,741,595.05 in the County of Santa Clara (($1.00 1, in this 

3— Miscellaneous Bonds ($4,762.0001, the actual State, the actual value of which is 2,228,822.30 

value of which is 4,657,493.91 (b) The Land and Buildings in which said 

Corporation keeps its said offices, the actual 

$22,038,671.36 value of which is 992,894.38 

They are: The condition of Said Real Estate is that it belongs 

■'San Francisco and North Pacific Railway Company 5 to said Corporation, and part of it is productive. 

per cent Bonds" ($476,000.00), "Southern Pacific Com- 7 — Interest on Loans and Bonds — uncollected 

pany, San Francisco Terminal 4 per cent Bonds" nnrl nr-ernprl IfMlSQDfifl 

(S150.000.00). San Francisco and San Joaquin Valley ana acauea 1BU„JSU.0U 

Rail-wav Company 5 per cent bonds" (530,000.00) 

"Northern California Railway Company 5 per cent TOTAL ASSETS $60,063,574.98 

Bonds" (83,000.00). "Market Street Railway Company 

First Consolidated Mortgage 5 per cent Bonds" ($728,- 

000.00). "Los Angeles Pacific Railroad Company of Cal- TT , ^ TT TmTT ^„ 

ifornia Refunding 5 per cent Bonds" (J400.000.00) "Los LIABILITIES 

Angeles Railway Company of California 5 per cent i c;j n~, i.;-« .„,. n, n ,.:,, o«, rt „n*-;Tio. +„ 

Bonds" ($334,000.00). "The Omnibus Cable Company 6 1— Said Corporation owes Deposits amounting to 

per cent Bonds" ($167,000.00), "Sutter Street Railway and the actual value of which IS $56,090,558.37 

Company 5 per cent Bonds" ($150,000.00), "Gough (Number of Depositors, 86,207. 
Street Railway Company 5 per cent Bonds" ($20,000.- a— „-.,«„ „_»,._* „* -rt an ~<.;*,. Qcrncr\ 
00) "San FTancisco" Oakland and San Jose Railway „ Average amount of Deposits, $650.65.) 
Company 5 per cent Bonds" ($5,000.00), "The Mer- 2 — Contingent Fund — Accrued Inter- 
chants' Exchange 7 per cent Bonds" ($1,375,000.00), terest on Loans and Bonds $ 180,390.50 

"San Francisco Gas and Electric Company 4% per cent o »„„_„ lTunri Actual VbIup 17Q9R9K11 

Bonds" ($523,000.00). "Los Angeles Gas and Electric 3— Reserve *und, Actual Value S,llU,bZb.ll 

Company 5 per cent Bonds." ($100,000.00), "Spring 3,973,016.61 

Valley Water Company 4 per cent Bonds" ($50,000.00), 

"German House Association 6 per cent Bonds" ($101,- inntrAT T T A ptt ttttfc ecn nc? cvj oo 

000.00), "Panama-Pacific International Exposition 6 per ^"iv^^T. 1? ,^t\t?!tJ ; Vtt^t'A'a'at 'iXA'™-i" w > s <4»° 

cent Notes" ($70,000.00). HIBERNIA SAVINGS AND LOAN SOCIETY 

4 — Promissory Notes and the debts thereby se- By CHARLES MAYO, President. 

cured, the actual value of which is $34,146,296.44 HIBERNIA SAVINGS AND LOAN SOCIETY 

The condition of said Promissory Notes and debts By R M TOBIN Secretary 

is as follows: They are all existing Contracts, owned ' * ' 

by said Corporation, and are payable to it at its office, 

which is situated at the corner of Market McAllister c,™ . „,„ ~~ r , Kr T _, ri _-- T . 

and Jones Streets, in the City and County of San Fran- „,» &1 j i £' u * CALif ukima. 

Cisco. State of California, and the payment thereof is nS^Z-fS* S°, u -?^ y °*, ^ n -,F r ™i s T v?~T. si? ' ,. j , 

secured by First Mortgages on Real Estate within this ^ C ? AJ i^* ,5 IA1 ° a 55 ?' X ?i ^S?, 1 ^ %Q n ¥, f?-^ 1 - du l? s V° rn ; 

State and the States of Oregon and Nevada. Said Pro- ea = h * or , himself says: That said CHARLES MAYO is President 

missory Notes are kept and held by said Corporation at I^t-t-IS.^ sa , 1 5-r?' T Jfl J°<K^t ,^ Sec .l etary of T HB HIBERNIA 

its said office, which is its principal place of business, SAVINGS AND LOAN SOCIETY, the corporation above men- 

and said Notes and debts are there situated. tioned, and that the foregoing statement is ; true. 

5— Promissory Notes and the debts thereby se r i? tobin * secret!?, 

cured, the actual value Of which is 476,500.00 Subscribed and sworn to before me this 2d dav of January, 1915. 

The condition of said Promissory Notes and debts is CHAS. T. STANLEY, 

as follows: They are all existing contracts owned by Notary Public in and for the City and County 

said Corporation, and are payable to it at its office, of San Francisco, State of California. 



||/W«. 



Vol. LXXm— No. 3 



SATURDAY. JANUARY 16. 1915 



Price 10 cents 




~4 WEEKLY JOURNAL 
ILLUSTRATION^ COMMENT 




ESTABLISHED **- 1S76 



Among recent purchasers of our First Preferred 6 per cent Stock 
is a successful San Francisco business man. 

He regards this as one of his most satisfactory investments be- 
cause — (1) the return of 7.27 per cent per annum (with no taxes to 
pay) is exceptionally good on a security of such unquestioned merit 
and safety, (2) it is a convenient reserve asset, the value of which 
should increase and which can be converted into cash or used as col- 
lateral for loans when cash is wanted, (3) he has picked up one of 
the best investment bargains in a market which may not again offer 
such opportunities in a generation. 

The Company is pleased because it has secured a desirable new 
partner in its business. 

We have six thousand stockholders scattered over the entire 
world, but what we particularly want is stockholders in California 
for the same reasons that banks favor the policy of having their 
stocks distributed among business men in their own communities. 

This policy is the California investors' opportunity and we are 
freely extending it, without discrimination as to price, to all consum- 
ers and others in the territory we serve. 

California is growing in population and industry, and the busi- 
ness of this company is bound to increase correspondingly. 

Every share of this stock has back of it more than $100 property 
value and earnings of several times the amount of the entire annual 
dividend. 

It is Non-Assessable and Tax Free in California, and is issued 
under the authority of the Railroad Commission. 

Price, $82.50 per $100 share, netting 7.27 per cent on investment. 
Write or apply to 

PACIFIC GAS AND ELECTRIC COMPANY, 

Stock Sales Department, 

445 Sutter Street 



THE WASP 



LEADING HOTELS AND RESORTS 



Have "You Dined in the 

Palace Hotel 
Court? 

Service and Cuisine Perfect 



Fairmont Under Same Management 



Palace Hotel Company 



HOTEL OAKLAND 

30 Minutes from San Francisco 
DIRECT FERRY TO EXPOSITION GROUNDS 
Cuisine and Service Unsurpassed. Rates Reasonable. 

Under Management of Victor Reiter. 



A A -y. .* ■- . ». -T. .» . .' 

» • t"VVWi 



1 



Notice 

During January we will give free a pretty wine tray with 
cash purchases of $2.00 and over. 

Kentucky Mercantile Co. 



Phone Sutter 4031 



488 SUTTER ST. 



WVWVWVVtttWvWtWVW^^ 



The Electric Way from 

San Francisco and Oakland 

To and Through 

The Sacramento Valley 

Look Up the Rate on all Tour Freight 

Train Schedules Designed for Busy 

Travelers 

OAKLAND, ANTIOCH 
& EASTERN RAILWAY 

Through. Redwood Canyon 
Over Bock Ballasted Road Bed 
Automatic Block Signals 
Comfortable Steel Coaches 
Observation Cars 

Ticket Offices 

Fortieth & Shafter Ave. 

In Oakland 

Piedmont 870 

Key Route Ferry Third & I Sts. 

In San Francisco In Sacramento 

Sutter 2339 Main 261 



| FAIRMONT HOTEL ! 

Recognized as the most complete and beautiful residence hotel in the • 

• world. 500 rooms, every one with attached bath. • 

Tlie Rendezvous of the discriminating travelers from every land 

Largest floor space devoted to public use of any hotel in the world. • 

2 EUROPEAN PLAN • 

3 PALACE HOTEL COMPANY 2 

• SAN FRANCISCO • 

2 1 Person $3.00 to $5.00 5 

9 I Persons $5.00 to $8.00 J 



Hotel St. Francis 




1 






Turkish Baths 

Twelfth Floor for Men 
Eleventh Floor for Women 






JAMES WOODS, Manager 



JULES RESTAURANT 




DANCING 

Every Thursday and Saturday Evenings 



Dinner with Wine $1.00 
675 MARKET STREET 



Dancing at 7 p. m. 

OPP. CHRONICLE 



Established 1853 

^—^SSJ >-# /I Monthly Contracts $1.50 per Month 

/TT'y ^rtlAA^O NEW WORKS JUST ERECTED AT 

1 / PUCf ' *~C^^^^ 27 TENTH STREET, S. P. 

W J*^<titS!^^^^^ Largest and Most Up-to-Date on Pacifi. 

^—^^ jyTT^ J^"^ Coast. Wagons call twice daily. Cleaning 

"^^^•^^ Dainty Garments Our Specialty. 

F. THOMAS PARISIAN DYEING & CLEANING WORKS 



Wellington Coal 

Best for Family Use 
For Sale by All Dealers 



K^oooa^ocoogsx 




ic^ocoocSjcooo^i 



Western Fuel Co. 



MINERS AND SHIPPERS 



San Francisco's Fashionable Society, Play and Frolic, in The WASP 



T 



SdE 



THE AUDITORIUM BALL 
By Grace Tibbits 

The pros and cons of the huge 
masked Hall at the new Auditorium 
arc still being discussed and every- 
one is unanimous in declaring it 
quite the most marvelous in the his- 
tory of San Francisco. 

All society was there along with 
the hoi poloi, which of course at- 
tended in droves. So dense was the 
miih of dancers that for any few 
Charming costumes to be noticed 
they had to be quite unusually 
charming. There were many that 
could have vied with Miss Helen 
Elizabeth Cowles, who won the first 
prize for the most original costume, 
had not the judges decided on her. 
She is a tall, graceful maid witli the 
brilliant, rosy coloring of a true 
English girl, and she certainly pre- 
sented a most fascinating picture 
in her costume of a native from the 
isle of Mindanaio. 

A most elaborate affair it was and 
totally unlike the usual Filipino 
woman's attire. The fair Helen, I 
hear, has broken her engagement 
to young Kenneth Davis, so she has 
suitors galore again, who are wor- 
shipping at her throne with re- 
newed ardor. Kenneth Davis is the 
son of the Wlnfleld Scott Davis's 
and a brother of Anita Davis, now 
Mrs. Kenneth MacDonald. 

The prize for clever dancing was 
awarded to Mrs. George Hewlett, 
who was garbed as a white powder 
puff. 

Some of the other clever costumes 
were worn by the Countess Kali- 
man Czarky, who is slim and strik- 
ing looking and wore a fascinating 
gown of black and silver with 
heavy ornaments of silver in her 
hair, and Miss Helen Hughson, who 
wore a real Turkish costume of pale 
pink satin made in loose panta- 
loons and a charming headdress of 
pink chiffon and pearls. 

Mrs. Alfred Rosenstirn, who is 
Mrs. Fred Talbot's daughter, was ex- 
tremely fetching as a "Balloon girl," 
in full white balloon skirt fringed 
with tiny balloons and balloons 
floating off from her headdress. 

The two Abercrombie girls were 
as usual, very attractively garbed, 
Milo as a maid of the ante-bellum 
days, and Margaret carrying out 
Harrison Fisher's ideal of her, as 
the "Girl of 1915." She was a gauzy 
golden little creature, studded with 
jewels and wide butterfly wings of 
gold gauze illuminated at the tips 
with tiny electric lights. 



cZSeWASP 



The Exposition Shows Its Hand ^ft^^^h^E&i 



THE hold-up of tin- two thousand hotels and apartment houses of 
San Francisco by tin- Exposition Company lias been initiated. 
We have before us their pronunciamento which is typical and 
brass-faced. The following excerpt couched in familiar Exposition 
language we reprint for the consideration of all: 

"These offices (local bureaus of information) will he provided witli 
daily information regarding rooms available, and the enormous busi- 
ness secured in this way will be distributed as evenly and equitably 
among all the hotels registered with the Bureau. An Official Hotel 
Guide will be printed and circulated throughout the United States 
and in foreign countries, in this Official Guide will be listed the 
name of every hotel registered with this Bureau, and the public will 
be informed that the rate and character of those hotels (and those 
hotels only) are endorsed by the Exposition. A registration charge 
of $1.00 per room, payable in six monthly installments, is asked tn 
defray the expenses, etc., etc." 

"And those hotels only," the little phrase in brackets, is the key- 
note of the document, the motive of the operation. It means in plain 
English, "You will be obliged to come through. If you do not come 
through then the influence and advertising of the Exposition is 
against you." 

The highwayman presenting a revolver could not be more frank, 
though it is quite possible that he might be more merciful. However 
this is business and the Exposition during their reign have become 
notorious for squeezing pennies and lassooing everything running 
toward money. Around every corner and down every avenue they 
have hunted advantage and captured it for themselves without com- 
punction. Now in a last fever of getting they turn their attention 
tc the hotels. 

Sometime ago it seems, that Edward H. Rolkin had a mistaken idea 
about organizing hotels and apartment houses in San Francisco for 
the purpose of directing the flow of guests to the Exposition. Some- 
thing like sixteen minor hotels were talked into membership. The 
other hostclries of the city turned the project down. 

But it was the very suggestion the Exposition had been looking for. 
They had already turned a trick with the Inside Inn, a wooden struc- 
ture and firetrap built two stories too high, but the plan of Mr. Rolkin 
taken up would prove a gold mine. For they had the authority and 
power to put it through. 

Hotels and apartment houses of the city have altogether at least 
three hundred thousand rooms. A dollar per room means three 
hundred thousand dollars. The Exposition saw the point at a glance. 
And to the hotels not desiring the Bureau, the approximate two 
thousand, excepting the sixteen minor places, in fine, the hotels and 
apartment houses, large and small, which ever since its inauguration 
have paid their money to the Exposition and made it possible, to these 
the Masters of the Exposition could state in substance and without 
alternative, "A dollar per room or we shall not endorse you, and not 
to be endorsed by us will have the effect of blacklisting you." 

It is a pretty scheme, isn't it, so full of fairness and honor? But of 
the three hundred thousand dollars there will be ninety per cent profit 
for the Exposition, and most undoubtedly every force will be used to 

(Continued on page 15) 



AS CONCERNS OSCAR 

Oscar Hammerstein has taken un- 
to himself another one. By this we 
mean "wife" which is quite a large 
word. Whether the lady cornered 
Oscar in an elevator or a cellar to 
make him do it will probably never 
come to light. But the fat, silk- 
hatted impresario does not deny 
that he has been captured. And, for 
all the world, he acts like a maver- 
ick roped. "I will neither admit 
nor deny anything," says Oscar in 
a rage. "The papers have married 
me so many times that I am a biga- 
mist." The Wasp does not under- 
stand that he has been much over- 
married, but it does understand 
that he has been much "unmar- 
ried." 



AS A MAN FEELS 

Hiram Powers, the American 
sculptor, once said to Mr. Angell, 
"The great need in the schools of 
our country, is the education of the 
heart." 

The more skillful the hand the 
more dangerous the sword it wields. 
Unless back of the hand is a heart 
we might better have left the hand 
untrained. It is exactly so with 
the facilities of the mind. The mere 
fact that they have been skilfully 
disciplined is no guarantee that 
they will not work the basest moral 
and social wrong. Out of the heart 
are the issues of life. 



«***♦♦**♦«««♦♦*«***«♦♦♦♦♦♦ 



| Shreve & Company 

* (Established 1852) 

f 

4 One of the Largest Collec- 
X tions of 




ROOKWOOD POTTERY 

in the United States is now 
on display on the second 
floor. This collection in- 
cludes innumerable shapes 
and sizes in Iris, Ombroso, 
Vellum, Matt and Glaze fin- 
ishes decorated in scenic and 
floral effects. 

Post Street and Grant Avenue 
San Francisco 



<k~x~x~x~x-x-x~x*<x«x»»«*** 



THE WASP 



Saturday, January 16, 1915. 




INS AND OUTS OF 
THE SOCIAL WORLD 



BY GRACE TIEBITS 




Effective Gowns 

Miss Phyllis de Young, who 
caught the bride's bouquet at Jane 
Hotaling's wedding and who, it 
rumor is correct, had every right 
to it, is wearing a fascinating cos- 
tume in the new mauve shade. It 
is made with a full skirt and a 
wide loose cape swings from the 
shoulders and is held in place by 
wide bands across the front. Her 
hat is a jaunty little affair on the 
same shade, made of satin with a 
saucy little feather at one side. 

Charming Miss Helen Hamilton, 
who is very brunette in coloring, 
with dark eyes that crinkle all up 
when she laughs, is most alluring 
in an all-brown velvet costume. The 
suit which fastens tight at the 
throat with a band of fur and the 
tiny little hat are all the same 
shade, and the effect is altogether 
charming. 

Miss Julia Van Fleet, another 
maid of the younger set, is look- 
ing very fetching in a black danc- 
ing frock made very dainty with 
white chiffon and lace. Her hat is a 
small black rolled up on one side 
in a very becoming way. 

And little Miss Winnifred de 
Wolfe, who has not yet arrived at 
the debutante age, is looking very 
smart in a dark green plaid frock, 
made with a circular skirt and a 
little tight jacket, and her hat is a 
tiny round affair being made like 
a Tommy Atkins hat in the same 
shade, with a stiff little military 
from horn of bright red in front, 
***** 

Pleasing All Parties 
Quite contrary to the usual cus- 
tom Miss Jane Hotaling was mar- 
ried by a civil ceremony instead of 
the usual orthodox one, Judge Hen- 
ry Melvin performing the ceremony. 
Of course there were no end of in- 
quiries as to the wherefor of it, the 
most probable answer being the 
differences in religion of the Hotal- 
ing family. Jane's mother, before 
her marriage was Miss Ella Kauf- 
man and she was a Jewess, while 
the Hotalings, of course, are Catho- 
lics, so the civil ceremony, I pre- 
sume, was to please all sides. 
***** 

A Very Good Catch 
Colonel Daniel C. Jackling, the 
copper king, who lived formerly in 
Salt Lake City, entertained a party 
of guests in his box at the ball last 
week, among them being Mrs. 
Frank Judge of Salt Lake, wlio 
was one of the party accompanying 
Colonel Jacklin iiere in his pri- 
vate car. Mrs. Judge it will be re- 
membered won the first prize at the 
Mardi Gras Ball last year, for 
having the best carried out cos- 
tume at the ball. She and her hus- 
band who is a mining man, had 
just returned from South America, 
where Mrs. Judge purchased the 



prize winning costume of a Brazil- 
ian dancer, and it was voted by all 
odds as the handsomest costume 
worn there. 

The Colonel, I hear, is becoming a 
very "big bug" in local society now- 
adays and is very much in demand 
for all occasions. The ever-busy 
match-makers are working over- 
time, they say, selecting a suitable 
mate for the copper king, who is a 
widower. A certain tall dark maid, 
whose family are very prominent 
in the world of fashion, is constant- 
ly included in the Colonel's part- 
ies and of course there is much 
whispering about it behind the tea- 
cups. 

* * * * * 

Changes Her Mind 
The Anthony Caminettis, like the 
Sylvanus Farnhams, have reconsid- 
ered their divorce proceedings and 
have decided to give matrimony an- 
other trial. They are once more liv- 
ing in their cozy apartments on 
Washington street from which 
handsome Mrs. Caminctti had fled 
shortly before Christmas to take re- 
fuge with her mother, Mrs. Samuel 
Hall, in Oakland. 

Mrs. Caminetti has been known 
before to have a rapid change of 
mind, for when she met young Cam- 
inetti she broke her engagement to 
another man and just quietly elop- 
ed with the son of the Chief of Im- 
migration. Mrs. Caminetti's young- 
er sister, Miss Alice Hall, will be a 
bride next month, when her fiance, 
Lieutenant Rapp Bursh, LT. S. A., 
arrives from the Philippines. 

* * * * * 

Just As Predicted 
As was predicted in the Wasp a 
couple of weeks ago, Mrs. Frederick 
Knight has already brought suit 
against her son-in-law, Gaillard 
Smart, for the guardianship of 
Thelma Parker Smart's little son, 
Richard Palmer Smart, and this 
suit is shortly to be followed by one 
to break her daughter's will. Mrs. 
Knight testifies that Smart is an 
unfit person to have the care of his 
infant son, for whom he has never 
shown any affection. There is also 
much dissatisfaction felt among all 
the Parker relatives that the Par- 
ker millions have been left outside 
of their family. It seems that Thel- 
ma Parker was the daughter of the 
late John Parker, who was Colonel 
Sam Parker's son. John Parker 
was to inherit this enormous for- 
tune when he became twenty-one, 
or if he died previously it would go 
to a child he might have. Well, it 
so happened that John Parker, who 
married when still a boy, died just 
before his twenty-first birthday, 
leaving no children until three 
months after his death when Thel- 
ma was born. And so other rela- 
tives claimed the estate, and a long 
legal fight ensued for years and 



years, and it was not until Thelma 
became sixteen years of age that the 
case was settled and she came into 
her fortune. So four years was all 
she really had of her money which 
will once more figure in the courts. 
* * * * * * 

Cupid Shoots Well 
Little Danny Cupid is hard at 
work these days and his victims 
are numerous, so I hear. Among the 
very latest are stunning Miss Eliza- 
beth Bull and Noble Hamilton, 
who announced their engagement 
at a tea which Miss Bull gave for 
Vesta Read, who is to be a bride 
next month. The fair Elizabeth, 
who is an unusually handsome 
maid— tall, measuring nearly six 
feet and very well proportioned — is 
the oldest daughter of the late 
Alpheus Bull and Mrs. Bull, and 
she is a niece of Miss Edith Bull, 
Mrs. Covington Pringle, who was 
Kathleen Bull, and of frail little 
Marie Bull, who married Dr. Walter 
C. Cludester and died within the 
year. Her mother, who was Miss 
Daisy Crowell, the daughter of Mrs. 
W. H. Crowell, was a great belle 
here several decades ago. She is also 
a niece of Mrs. E. W. Robinson, 
whose husband, Captain Robinson, 
of the army, died a couple of years 
ago in Texas. Young Hamilton is 
the son of Mr. and Mrs. Edward H 
Hamilton and a brother of pretty 
Llelen Hamilton, who is one of the 
most popular belles in the younger 
set, Mead Hamilton, who married 
Miss Mabel Dodge, and who was 
subsequently divorced from her, is 
his brother. The wedding is to be 
an affair of the early spring and 
will take place at the Bull home on 
Jackson street. 

* * * * * 

The Kohl Hause-Warming 
All of Society, with a capital C, 
are planning to journey down the 
peninsula way on Saturday to at- 
tend the house-warming the Fred 
Kohl's are giving to celebrate the 
opening of their magnificent new 
home in the hills back of Easton. 
By way of entertaining their guests 
Mrs. Kohl is planning to have a 
concert, when the wonderful pipe 
organ 'which is installed in Ithe 
music room, will be dedicated. John 
Hillman is to sing several solos and 
there is to be an organ recital by 
Mr. Huncken. as well as several 
operatic selections rendered by the 
charming hostess herself. It seems 
that Mrs. Kohl, who was Miss Eliz- 
abeth Godey of Washington, was 
studying for the grand opera stage 
when she was wooed and won by 
Kohl. She possesses a wonderfully 
rich voice, which has only been 
heard two or three times by her 

friends here. 

* * * * 

And Still Divorces 
Santa Barbara seems to be the 
scene of several society divorces 
these days, the latest being that of 
the Charles Haven Ladd Johnstons. 
Mrs. Johnston was Miss Edith New- 
- lands before her marriage, and she 
is the daughter of United States 
Senator Francis G. Newlands of Nev- 
ada. Mr. and Mrs. Johnston were 



out here together on a visit a couple 
of years ago, and all seemed quite 
happy and serene on their matri- 
monial horizon, but a year ago they 
decided to separate, Mrs. Johnston 
coming to Santa Barbara to reside. 
Mr. Johnston, who is quite a well- 
known writer and who has always 
made his home in Washington, D. 
C, married the daughter of Senator 
Newlands about twelve years ago. 
Cruelty, desertion, and an over-in- 
dulgence in the cup that cheers are 
said to be the causes of their dif- 
ferences. 



* * * 



aMrdi Gras Royalty 

Everyone is quite delighted over 
the news that handsome tall Alfred 
Whittell has been chosen as king 
of the Mardi Gras and will reign 
over the throng of merrymakers, 
along with Queen Anne. Young 
Whittell is the adopted son of the 
George Whittells, being younger 
than George Whittell junior, who 
is now on the Continent. He is one 
of the most popular beaux of the 
younger set, and is an unusually 
clever dancer. The fair Anne left 
hurriedly for Stockton last week 
with her mother, Mrs. J. D. Peters, 
who was suddenly taken quite ill, 
and ,so was not present at the 
Auditorium ball. The court of 
Marie Antoinette has been chosen 
for the Mardi Gras setting, and all 
of the fair maids who are to parti- 
cipate in the pageant are preparing 
brocaded costumes with pamers 
and they will all go with powdered 
coiffures. 

* * * * 

A Charming Young Lady 
A very charming dancing party 
took place last week on Russian 
Hill when Mrs. Elizabeth Gerber- 
ding entertained about fifty of the 
younger set in honor of her daugh- 
ter Beatrice, who is attending col- 
lege at Berkeley. Miss Gerberding, 
who, like her mother, is devoted to 
books, prefers college to society at 
present, so she will not make her 
debut for several seasons to come. 
She is a half-sister of Harry Sears 
Bates, who married Gladys Merrill 
and of Albert Bates who married 
Katherine Devol, daughter of Gen- 
eral Carroll Devol, TJ. S. A. 

* -x- * * 

Not What He Appeared 
Eastbay society is terribly stirred 
up by the recent defalcation 
charges against Dr. John C. N. Bur- 
rows, whose marriage to talented 
Miss Virginia Pierce of Berkeley 
was a social event of two weeks 
ago. Miss Pierce, who is the daugh- 
ter of Mr. and Mrs. James M. Pierce 
of Cloyne Court, Berkeley, gave up 
an operatic career to become the 
wife of Dr. Burrows, and after their 
marriage they journeyed south to 
Santa Barbara on their honeymoon. 
While there the doctor gave a 
worthless check for a valuable 
painting done by John Gamble, 
one of Santa Barbara's best-known 
artists, whose wild flower paintings 
are famous, and received a goodly 
sum from Mr. Gamble as change. 



.Saturday. January 16, 1915. 



THE WASP 



Now it appears that "Burrows" lia- 
other names in other cities and la 
rows made her operatic debut here 
when >he sang ".Minii" iii "La Bo- 
heme" with the Lombard! Opera 
Company, who were here two years 
ago. 

* # # » 

Gaiety Doings 
The Gaiety Club is finally awak- 
ening after its long drawn out 
sleep, and it is to have one party 
this winter in spite of all of the 
predictions to the contrary. This 
."elusive little chili has always giv- 
en two or three dances every winter 
Which have been quite the nicest 
affairs of the season, but this win- 
ter the Gaiety maids seem to have 
losi most of their enthusiasm. The 
personellc of the club changes great- 
ly each winter, for when a member 
becomes engaged she is personna 
non grata in the organization and 
must resign. It was originated al- 
most ten or twelve years ago when 
there was really no ultra exclusive 
dancing club for the younger girls 
and the debutantes of that season 
decided to organize a truly exclu- 
sive club of their own. The presi- 
dent was Miss Newell Drown and 
some of the other members were 
Miss Lucy Given Coleman, now Mrs. 
Gemaine Vincent, Miss Elizabeth 
Livermore. Miss Natalie Coffin, now 
Mis. Crawford Green, Miss Helen 
Cheesebrough and Miss Elsie Tal- 
land. Miss Marion Crocker has 
been elected the president for this 
year and Miss Ruth Winslow is 
the secretary. The muchly antici- 
pated ball has been set for Febru- 
ary 4th, when all of this year's crop 
of buds will attend. 



Santa Barbara society has been 
making merry for Herbert Newhall, 
Who has been spending the holiday 
season there as the guest of Com- 
modore and Mrs. James H. Bull and 
Miss Marjorie Bull. It was quite 
the first opportunity that Pere and 
Mere Bull have had of meeting the 
adored Marjorie's fiance, as the 
whole romance between them took 
place in the East, where Marjorie 
had been exiled until she recov- 
ered from her affaire du coeur with 
George Baker. It seems that Mar- 
jorie and the talented young com- 
poser were very much in love, but 
the lack of the necessary where- 
withal! on the part of Baker caused 
dark glances in his direction from 
the Commodore, but more particu- 
larly Mrs. Commodore. So while 
Marjorie was visiting her brother, 
Captain Henry T. Bull, II. S. A., 
and his wife, she met young New- 
hall, who hails from one of Bos- 
ton's oldest and wealthiest families. 
And so, of course, when Mr. New- 
hall accepted their invitation to 
spend the holidays with them, the 
Bulls promptly killed the fatted 
calf, and all made merry. The wed- 
ding is set for the early spring, and 
will be an out-of-door affair, at the 
Bulls' attractive home on Upper 
State street. 



THE TATTLER 

Everybody is still talking about 

tin- hall at the Civic Auditorium 
last Saturday night. Thomwell 

Mullally has more than demon- 
strated himself as a lit successor of 

Ned Greenway, who for bo many 

years held the social scepter of the 
city in his hand. It would have 
been impossible to have handled 
the affair any better, and the best 
ol all was that everybody had a 
good time. 

Tin' crowd was divided into sev- 
eral different classes, each with its 

own viewpoint. There were those 

of the ultra-exclusive set who never 
by any manner of means rub el- 
bows with the hoi-poloi. 

* * * * 

The Lady and Salome 
There is a coterie of the young 
married people in the peninsula 
set. however, who have the demo- 
cracy that comes with being abso- 
lutely sure of one's self, and they 
stayed on until the last note of 
the band and had, as they always 
do, the best time possible. I am 
speaking of that interesting little 
circle dominated by the three Hop- 
kins girls. Mrs. Augustus Taylor, 
Mrs. Will Taylor and Mrs. Frederick 
McNear. They are the most natural 
people in the world, without any 
petty affectations, who always en- 
ter into the zest of an affair like 
that of last Saturday. They go be- 
cause they expect to enjoy them- 
selves. Part of their fun is ming- 
ling with the crowd and, with an 
everpresent sense of humor, they go 
in for all the comedy they can find. 

I heard several of this set around 
a tea-table at the Polo Club at San 
Mateo on Sunday discussing one of 
the older matrons who had left the 
ball early because she never "en- 
joyed mixed crowds." One of the 
girls, who is something of a wit, 
said with a laugh, "I wonder what 
she expected. I told her she had 
better stay at home, because I knew 
just what she would do. 

"I went with her to hear Salome, 
when Mary Garden was here the 
first time. She complained all 
through the performance because 
the play was so unpleasant. I ask- 
ed her if she had come with the 
expectation of seeing 'Cinderella'?" 

"That's all a pose with her," ex- 
claimed another jaunty matron. "I 
came upon her in the hills one day. 
She had been for a walk and had a 
book with her. When I rode up 
to her, she tried to hide the title 
from me, but I saw it nevertheless. 
It was the 'Memoirs of Fanny Hill'." 

-X- * * * 

Just How It Is 
There has been much gossip over 
the tea-cups anent the Harry Long 
divorce suit. While Mrs. Long has 
never been a prominent figure in 
society, she has a number of very 
delightful friends, and one of the 
choicest bits of humor in the case 
was the fact that several of the 
young men spoken of by the irate 
husband as being attentive to his 
wife were attentive at the shrine of 
other of her women friends. 



Mrs. Long is a pretty woman ami 
a very well educated iiue. having 

graduated from Stanford Univer- 
sity. All of tin- papers, with their 
usual capacity for mixing things, 
said that her father was an attor- 
ney of Stockton. He i~ one of the 

well-known merchants of the town. 
Everyone, however, is sympathis- 
ing with her, and there are many 
tale- going around of Long's sniall- 
ness. One of them is an epitome ol 
stinginess, if it is true. When the 
Longs were married, Mrs. Long was 
just twenty, lie was over forty. Dur- 
ing their engagement he gave her 
several beautiful presents, includ- 
ing a bracelet, an engagement ring, 
and a diamond brooch. After they 
were married .Mrs. Long discovered 
that he had never paid for them 
and she had to do her own work, 
skimp in her wardrobe and forego 
all pleasures until she had saved 
enough out of his hundred and fif- 

(Continucd on Page 14) 



Ti» visit San Francisco without see- 
ing A. An. hews' Diamond Palace would 
he like visiting Buropc without seeing 
Paris. It is a leading feature of San 
Francisco, a marvel el' beauty and elo- 
gance, and is unquestionably the must 
■ Iry store in the worh). 
Visit' iidents are cordially in- 

vited '" examine t h^ marvels of genius 
;it ."hi Kearny Street. Established 1850. 
Open S a. ni. to 5:30 p. m. 



Phone Kearny 2578 



FOR EXCLUSIVE CUSTOM MADE 
SUITS AND COWNS 

16S POST STREET SAN FRANCISCO 



MRS. SARAH CECILIA CRANE 

Emmanuel Practitioner 

Hours 10 to 4 

1452 Divisadero St., near Geary St. 

Phone Fillmore 3929 



i 



V \ \ \ \ \ \ \ \ V N / 

PHONE FRANKLIN 5062 

/ 

MRS. F. W. WOOD | 

Formerly F. Gerard of New York ' 

Sowns and blouses '%, 

For Sale and Made to Order / 

A.1& OFARRELL STREET / 

SAN FRANCISCO / 

•>\\\\\\\\\\\N 




■fiffev 



■-y~"^ /-^ 



SCHOOLS 




| PARENTS, A TTENTION! 1 

I i 

<§ IN selecting a Business College (j* 

V ii to which to send yojr boys 5 1 

(S * or girls, you should remem- 9 

** ber that practically all the expert 5 1 

iS short-hand reporters of the State §• 

1g advise you that Gallagher-Marsh J? 

A Short-Hand System is the best, <3; 

•§ and you should therefore send *l 

a. them to <3j 

I Gallagher- Marsh 1 

1 Business College 1 

<B 1256 MARKET STREET g 

t=; which specializes on Snort-Hand, |L 

gi Typing and Boot-Keeping. Day 'S 

q and Evening Classes. |L 



HEALUS™ 



RUSSIAN IMPERIAL 
SCHOOL OP DANCING 

VERONINE VESTOFF 
(Late associate of Pavlowa) 

The Imperial Russian 
Ballet School Maintained 
by the Czar of Russia for 
training children to dance, 
is famous throughout the 
world for having brought 
the art of dancing to a 
point of perfection not ap- 
proached in any other 
country. 

Veronine Vestoff is the 
only accredited representa- 
tive of this school in the 
United States. 
Chateau Bohlig — Pine and 
Powell Sts., San Francisco, Cal. 



COLLEGE 



1215 Van Ness Avenue 
SAN FRANCISCO 



16th & San Pablo Ave. 
OAKLAND 



PUCKETT'S 
College of Dancing 

ASSEMBLY HALL, 1268 SUTTER 
CLASSES: 

Beginners' Classes Mondays 

Classes and Socials .... Wednesdays 

TANGO CLASSES Thursdays 

Assemblies Fridays 

FOR PRIVATE LESSONS 
PHONE FRANKLIN 118 



THE XIBIAW STUDIOS 
OF MODEM DANCES 

Miss Claribel Kirby announces Mr. 
Gilbert Littlejohn has joined the teach- 
ing forces of this instituion. Private 
lessons or class instruction by appoint- 
ment only. Tea and refreshments if 
desired. 

435 Powell Street, 

Third Floor 

Telephone Sutter 210S 

Instructions given with improved 

methods — Fox Trot, Lulu Fado, One 

Step, Hesitation, Tango, Maxixe and all 

the new dances. 



A. MAHR B. M1ECZKOWSKI 

Graduates of the Imperial School 

Russian Dancing School 

Imperial Method Taught 

1509 Cough Street, S. F. 

Telephone West 493S 



THE WASP 



Saturday, January 16, 1915. 



cZ^WASP 

The Pacific Coast Weekly 



Published weekly by 

THE WASP PUBLISHING COMPANY (Inc.) 

49 SIABY ST., SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 

Phone, Douglas 1871 

MARTIAL, DAVOUST Managing Editor 

PAUL GWYNNB Editor 

GLENN H. JOHNSON - - - - Associate Editor 

SERALD C. HALSEY ---------- Attorney 

SUBSCRIPTION — In the United States, Canada, and Mexico, $5 a year in advance. 
Entered at the San Francisco Postoffice as second-class matter. 



The "Wasp will gladly publish notices of social events and other 
items of interest to its readers. Manuscripts should be at this office 
not later than Wednesday morning of the week's issue. 



Here 's a word of good-bye to Carroll Cook. He was a good fighter 
with a brilliant mind. He played his part in the game with courage 
and fire, and he took what was his and asked consent of no man. He 
had his own ideas about life and how it should be lived, and for what 
others said or thought of him he cared very little. He enjoyed his 
dinners and his freedom and he was no welcher. On the whole he was 
very much himself and a pretty good fellow. And you have got to 
respect a man who has the courage to be himself. 
****** 

At the recent annual meeting of the Associated Charities, when the 
yearly reports were filed and new officers elected, Mrs. Charles Gush- 
ing advised placing delinquent husbands on the uncultivated lands 
of California, where enforced hard work would arouse in them a 
desire to return to the family tree. We ask to know — is thus cruelty 
or charity? Would any reasonable-minded man, however lazy and 
slave-driven, return to a regular apartment-house wife having looked 
on the pastoral? A more brilliant idea would be to banish to the 
country a certain portion of our idle women. It would not only do 
desire to return to the family tree. We ask to know — is this cruelty 

ideals. 

****** 

Why should a woman with a parlor soprano think herself meant 
for Grand Opera? And why should so many women look with 
yearning eyes toward the stage? The trouble is that in this land of 
America our female portion have allied themselves with yellow jour- 
nalism. A little publicity goes further than a husband or all the 
beautiful things of life that might be. But behind the footlights there 
is little real happiness. Only genius can shine there and keep the 
sweetness of its life beyond that. There are very few women who pos- 
sess even talent, and talent in most cases does not mean success. Mrs. 
M. E. Ward, whose stage name is Miss Winona Queen Andrews, and 
who has been rehearsing something or other at the Hotel Oakland, 
has applied for a divorce from Andrews because the idea of stardom 
is more pleasing to her. We do not know Andrews or why she mar- 
ried him, but a man is always lucky to lose a woman with the stage 
bug. At the same time we sincerely hope the lady gets on. 
****** 

W. L. McGregor, the well-known mining man, has filed suit against 
James P. Rains for $50,000 damages for the alienation of his wife's 
affections. It seems that the cave-like or fascinating Rains lured 
the willing lady into two hotels, where they registered as man and 
wife, and that he was about to open an apartment house for her 
benefit. Thus does the eternal triangle dance on its corners again. 
But what reason for tagging the lady as $50,000 worth? It appears 
to us she has greatly depreciated in value. Surely the fond husband 
cannot estimate that occupying two hotels with Rains made her so 
dear to him? If that is the case she might as well go on doing it, 
and, increasing accordingly, her value would mount into Heaven. 
And why should not McGregor be grateful to Rains for his part in it? 
A claim for $50,000 is to say the least premature and anger against 
Rains very conspicuously inconsistent. What McGregor should do 
is place the lady at her true value, which in this instance is exactly 
nothing at all. A married woman who takes a room with another man 
at an hotel issurely no good to any husband on earth. 




RUSSIANS WANT CLOSER RE- 
LATIONS WITH U. S. 

Largely as a result of the present 
war, some Russian economists and 
business men are beginning to fa- 
vor closer trade relations between 
their country and the United 
States. A campaign is now under 
way in the Czar's dominions with 
the object of arousing interest in 
the project on the part of Russian 
men of affairs in general. 

Ivan H. Ozeroff, professor of Polit- 
ical Economy at Moscow University, 
a member of the Council of State 
and a Director of the Russian-Asia- 
tic and Central Banks, who has for 
years contended for closer commer- 
cial relations between Russia and 
this nation, has recently been cireu- 
lnting a written argument through- 
out the empire for the purpose of 
trying to awaken interest which 
will lead to action. He has sent the 
communication to the Ministers of 
the Crown at Petrograd, and to 
leading financiers, bankers, manu- 
facturers, merchants, and business 
men generally in all parts of Rus- 
sia. The communication was also 
sent to United States Consul Gen- 
eral John H. Snodgiass at Moscow. 
Prof. Ozeroff argues that Ameri- 
can capital and American enter- 
prise would be of great service in 
developing Russian industries, 
while there would be an excellent 
return for the money, time, and 
brains expended by the Americans. 
He declares that Americans might 
take in hand the organization of ir- 
rigation work in the cotton dis- 
tricts of Central Asia. 

There is also a great field in the 
petroleum industry. Prof. Ozeroff 
explaining that large capital is re- 
quired for Russian petroleum pro- 
duction, because operating compan- 
ies must be prepared to construct 
ways of communication, improve 
water courses, and otherwise en- 
ter upon the extensive operations 
necessarily connected in Russia 
with the development of the petro- 
leum business. 

Due to lack of Russian capital, 
the control of petroleum production 
in many fields has recently passed 
into the hands of men of other 
countries, -but American groups are 
stated not to be represented in this 
foreign control. The mining of cop- 
per and gold in the new districts of 
Russia has also of late gone under 
foreign control, so Prof. Ozeroff de- 
clares, and for the same reason as 
in the case of petroleum — lack of 
Russian capital. 

The author of the communication 
goes on to say that nevertheless, 
even when Russian resources are 
thus being worked by foreign cap- 
ital and under the general direction 
of foreigners, the companies oper- 
ating in Russia have always looked 
to the United States for technical 
improvements. One of the gold 
mining companies, for instance, has 
lately been investigating the system 
used in the Alaskan gold fields. 
Ozeroff says that at the present 



time it would be possible for Ameri- 
cans to enter Russia on highly fav- 
orable terms for themselves. Ameri- 
can capitalists could now acquire, 
he points out, shares of important 
Russian companies at low prices — 
oil-bearing properties, copper mines, 
railroad concessions. The Russian 
authority says that for this pur- 
pose it would be necessary to organ- 
ize a Russian-American bank which 
would be of special importance in 
connection with concessions for rail- 
way construction or irrigation 
work. 

At present the exchange of goods 
between the United States and Rus- 
sia is largely indirect, according to 
the Ozeroff statement, owing partly 
to the lack of an American credit 
institution in Russia to supply in- 
formation concerning the financial 
position of customers. If a Russian- 
American bank were established 
now it would probably play an im- 
portant part after the present war, 
thinks the Moscow professor, since 
it appears that Russia must turn 
to the United States for funds for 
its government and industries, 
which Europe will then be unable 
to supply. 

The establishment of such a con- 
nection between the two countries 
would, Prof. Ozeroff believes, bring 
about a certain degree of American- 
ization in methods of attracting 
capital. For instance, he says that 
the construction of railroads in Si- 
beria and Northern Russia could 
be encouraged by supplying the 
railroad companies with tracts of 
land, as has been done in the Unit- 
ed States, which would result in the 
colonization of the districts travers- 
ed. 



GERMANY'S NEW PROBLEMS 

As a result of the war German 
chemists have been confronted with 
a number of important technical 
problems. Some of these problems 
are old ones that have been render- 
ed acute by the war's interference 
with commerce, while others are 
newer and are all the more difficult 
because little attention had been 
given them before the opening of 
hostilities. The chemists are co- 
operating in a very marked manner 
to furnish substitutes for gasoline 
and rubber. 

As regards the supply of gasoline, 
Germany lias in the past depended 
almost entirely on the foreign mar- 
kets. The greatest quantities of 
this 'important fuel were imported 
from Russia, Galicia, the Dutch 
East Indies and especially Rou- 
mania. Normal imports at this 
time can be had only from the last- 
named country. 

It has been necessary, therefore, 
to turn to substitutes, the most 
important of which are benzol and 
alcohol. Benzol is a by-product of 
the manufacture of coke, and the 
German production amounts to 



Saturday, January 16, 1915, 



THE WASP 



about 160,000 tons a year, of which 
about 60,000 tons arc used for chem- 
ical purposes, especially in the dye 
and color industries. About 100,000 
tons are available for fuel purposes. 
a- flu- consumption of gasoline in 
German; amounted to l7H.sno tons 
in 1912, it will be seen that a con- 
siderable part of the gasoline can 
be replaced by benzol. 

Benzol possesses very valuable 

qualities as a fuel, containing H,.">i;n 
heat units per kilo, and being only 
slightly inferior to gasoline in this 
respect. A disadvantage in Winter 
is the high freezing point. Benzol 
freezes above zero, -i2 degrees Fah- 
renheit, and then must be raised 
to about seven degrees, 44.6 degrees 

Fahrenheit, before it will melt. Ef- 
forts are being made to overcome 
this disadvantage by adding nitro- 
gen. There is no danger of freezing 
if alcohol is added, and mixtures 
and alcohol have proved very suc- 
cessful. There is no shortage of al- 
cohol for motor purposes. Toward 
the end of August the available 
supply in Germany amounted to 
more than 26,000,000 gallons. On 
account of complications arising 
from the war, the average distilla- 
tion was reduced by 40 per cent. 

Problems arising from the short- 
age of rubber are much more diffi- 
cult than those arising from the 
motor fuel situation. This is al- 
ready shown by the increase in rub- 
ber prices and by the strict mili- 
tary regulation of its use. The im- 
portation of india rubber has been 
interrupted, and the synthetic pro- 
duction of this valuable material 
was neglected before the war. Sev- 
eral satisfactory substitutes have 
been evolved by combining acetone 
and benzol products with india 
rubber. A certain amount of rub- 
ber can be maintained by the man- 
ufacture of the regenerated product 
from scrap rubber. This industry 
is highly developed and large stores 
of old rubber exist. 

The problem of providing the in- 
dustries with nitrogens is a serious 
one. The importation of Chile salt- 
peter has been interrupted and the 
country is short nearly 800,000 tons 
of this material, as measured by the 
consumption in 1912. 

American rosin in large quanti- 
ties is needed for the tightening of 
fibers in the manufacture of paper. 
For this purpose there is no satis- 
factory substitute. 



Perhaps You Know Them 



(By PAUL (iWYNNKi 



War Time Exchange 

They are calling it the War Time 
exchange these days. Though the 
regular market has at least been re- 
opened, there is not much spirit in 
the buying and selling, and Frank 
J. Corr's place has developed into a 
little stock market in one sense. 
Around lunch time every day, 
guests of the Palace drop into the 
Grand Buffet, and stock trading 
that would open your eyes some- 
times taken. The Grand Buffet is 
located on New Montgomery street 
opposite the Palace Hotel, and is 
one of the most popular places in 
the city. 



THROUGH drawn curtains, and 
with her knees in the soft 
plush of a couch. Mrs. Pax re- 
garded the last of her husband as 
hi' proceeded down the walk to the 
gate, then out on tin- boulevard. 
with narrowed eyes. Even the half 
San Mateo twilight did not decor- 
ate him in her sight. Yet their part- 
ing had been most pleasant. He 
was on his way to attend to certain 
business interests in Redwood City 
and he would spend the night 
there. It was his custom once or 
twice a week to do so, and she nev- 
er objected. She was blonde, almost 
to glinting, blue-eyed with a drift- 
ing look, tiltcd-chinned (men whom 
she did not like told her she was 
haughty) and her clinging kimono 
revealed a figure to which consider- 
able of the fruits of youth still 
clung. Having watched her hus- 
band out of sight with something 
like pleased riddance on her face, 
she went to the telephone and ask- 
ed "long distance" for San Fran- 
cisco, then Mark Graw. 

"It is Ethel speaking," she an- 
nounced, having got her party. "He 
has gone to Redwood City again 
and I am free tonight * * * * " 

After about five minutes' conver- 
sation, in which reference was made 
to former meetings, she concluded 

with. "At B 's then, at 8 o'clock. 

Yes, I will be on time, dear." 

She hung up the receiver and 
with a tatter of ragtime on her lips 
ran unstairs to dress, pausing at 
the top to call her maid. 

He was a tall, lift-shouldered 
young man with a frowning, im- 
portant and horsy air, who looked 
as though he might at one time 
graduated from California Rugby. 
At present he swaggered in a busi- 
ness which might describe him too 
well to mention. His apparent ab- 
solute lack of all finer sensibilities 
betokened what a perfect, regular- 
brand physician he might have be- 
come had he so chosen. He made 
love like a woodman swings an axe, 
and took his kisses after the man- 
ner of a very hungry and undainty 
person ravishing a small orange. 
His methods, however, seemed to 
please the lady, for whenever she 
voiced "Stop!" she always smiled 
afterwards and petted his hand, or 
smuggled in her old-rose hues clos- 
er to him. It was a private box in 
which they adored each other, and 
a quart bottle of Cliquot refereed 
the bout and effervesced in glasses. 
In odd pauses they watched it mus- 
ingly—those white bubbles which 
rise like promised kisses without 
end. On the poppy way to intoxi- 
cation, and in the full blonde blaze 
of herself, Mrs. Pax was rather a 
choice concoction. She responded 
dramatically to her lover's wooing, 
indulging in long sighs between 
drinks and met his crudeness with 
the look of one happily conquered. 



She could not have loved him more 
unless he had beaten her. treatment 
which your through-and-throiigh 
blond creature sometimes seems 
to require before yielding her heart 
wholly. Since the details of love are 
interesting except to those who exe- 
cute them, the two hours spent in 
the cafe will not be further enlarg- 
ed upon, At HI o'clock a notion 
Struck the lovers and they decided 
they could spare an hour to visit 
the Barhary Coast where they had 
never yet gone together. But it was 
only to be an hour. The Coast, 
however has tentacles of its own. 

Close to 11 o'clock a couple stood 
outside one of the big cafes on 
Powell street. To either side of 
them the glittering White Way, in 
the process of cashing in, danced 
spangle-like and glared back at the 
moon, as, from the stage a naughty 
soubrettc challenges "the gods." 
The man was short, thick-necked, 
and of florid complexion. When 
he took off his hat for a moment to 
wipe away the perspiration caused 
by the close atmosphere of the box 
he had just left with his compan- 
ion, he showed a shining bald head. 
A couple of large diamonds spat 
light on his fingers. His clothes 
fitted him as elegantly as his cor- 
pulence permitted. He was hoarse- 
voiced and carried a manner of bus- 
iness energy. He was the sort of 
man whose highest compliment to a 
woman would be a check. For that 
reason he would please a great 
many and probably please himself 
by thus passing as a devil of a fel- 
low among them. Vanity requires 
little bolstering and the man who 
buys usually can accomplish that 
little. The lady in the case was of 
willowy, false-haired granduer. A 
Gainsborough, drooped rakishly, 
decorated the important part of 
this and an upheld purple skirt 
the other extreme. As her face, her 
smile, and her stare showed no more 
intelligence than any of the street 
lights, however, perhaps this state- 
ment, with regard to importance, 
could be reversed. She leaned on 
her companion's arm in the man- 
ner of any weak woman requiring 
help to a third bottle. He called 
her Rhoda and she called him 
George. She glanded at her watch 
and remarked that it was "too deuc- 
edly early to go in." 

"What do you feel like doing 
then?" he acquiesced. 

She thought for a moment. "Let's 
go down the line," she suggested. 

He called a "taxi" and they got 
in. She fell against him with the 
shock of a sudden stop to evade 
something immediately after start- 
ing and he held her there, petting 
her long hands with his be diam- 
onded pudgy ones. 

"Sweet girl," he murmured thick- 
ly, "sweet little Rhoda! Some day 
she will not be just my stenograph- 
er, will she?" 



She lashed out at him: "Oh, I 
don't know. You men -one can 
neve trust you. Perhaps you have 
been doing nothing but lying to 
me. And you might mean that you 
intend to "can" me' tor as a stenog- 
rapher I admit that 1 am a pretty 
poor -ample." 

He held her face in his hands and 
kissed her against her will. 

"But it is true." she persisted. 

"How can I prove to you that it 
isn't?" 

She frowned distantly. "You 
might give me a little present of ten 
dollars." 

"Haven't I always given you mon- 
ey?" 

"Yes, but I want a little present 
right now." 

He reached in his pocket and 
pressed the money into her hand. 
She kissed hid playfully. He called 
to the driver to increase his speed. 
In a wake of dust the car barked 
down Kearny street. In a few min- 
utes they had turned into the shaft 
of light which swallows the adven- 
turer and glints the uniforms on 
Pacific Street, and the car came to 
a stop in front of a resort entered 
by a flight of steps leading to a 
basement. From here they went 
from place to place, doing the usu- 
al things which skimmers do. They 
condescended mutually in certain 
instances to admire and invite to 
their table the girls of the place, 
devilish or pathetic, who, accord- 
ing to their personalities, appeal- 
ed to their soused sympathies. And 
every story of a wasted life— daring 
of tear stained— brought forth an 
order for another round of drinks, 
and on parting, a strongly-express- 
ed hope of meeting again. It was 
the most wonderful sort of good- 
fellowship— the kind that pays as 
it proceeds. The lady exchanged 
confidences as well with bald- 
voiced entertainers. These they 
tipped muniliicently, throwing 
dollar pieces with a clang to the 
center of the dance floor, while ev- 
eryone stared at them in conse- 
quence. And through it all the 
(Continued on page 18) 

♦ ± 

•!• Established 1868. 

| Goldstein & Co. 

f Official Costumers 

\ and Wig Makers 



For all leading San Francisco and t 
Coast Theatres. Private Tlieatri- 3j 
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Store 2, Cor. Halght St. and Masonic Ave. 
Store 3, Cor Sacramento St. and Presidio 

Ave. 
Store 4, 84 Post Street, east of Kearny 
Store 5, Cor. Carl and Cole Streets 
Store G, Cor. Union and Steiner Streets 
Store 7, Cor. Powell and Sutter Streets 



THE WASP 




The wild hawk to the snow-swept 

sky, 
The Bee to the opening cIot er. 
The heart of a Man to the heart of 

a Maid 
All the wide world over — 
All the wide world over, lass, 
Ever the trail holds true — 
Over the world and under the 

world 
And back at the last to you. 

— Kipling. 

* * * # -S 

People You Know 

"Castles in the Air," Broadway's 
latest temple of the dance, drew out 
a fair-sized crowd for the opening 
and the scattering of professional 
folk in it provided something of a 
cosmopolitan air. Yet beneath it 
all there lurked a tinge of frost that 
made itself felt especially by the 
fashionable present. One very 
smart person went so far as to in- 
timate that , "even with the com- 
bined efforts of Anne Morgan, Eliza- 
beth Marbury, Elsie de Wolfe, the 
Castles and the ubiquitous Mr. 
Worm, the place would never be a 
roost for society night owls." Miss 
Marbury was the only one of the 
three "girls" who are backing the 
venture to show up, and instead of 
at least affecting a radiant smile, no 
matter how she felt inwardly, the 
dear young thing looked frightfully 
worried. Her corrugated brow was 
enough to take the spirit out of 
the widest tangoist, but she did 
muster up a smile for Mrs. Jimmy 
Eustis and her crowd as they troop- 
ed in, for they were the sort of folk 
she had banked on. Mme. Olga 
Petrova, aside from applauding the 
' Vernon Castles until they were forc- 
ed to bow to her, tried to switch 
herself onto Mrs. Jimmy Eustis's 
bunch. Has Mme. Olga visions of 
a social position through Mrs. Eus- 
tis? For a time that dear charming 
Willie Rhinelander Stewart, Jr., 
looked longingly at Mrs. John Ja- 
cob Astor, but Madeline would not 
dance. Willie's jewels are superb. 
No woman attracted more attention 
than Mrs. Tyler Morse, whose elab- 
orate gown seemed to please Tyler 
as much as herself. Without Rita 
and flying about from one table 
to another, Phil Lydig had a won- 
derful time, and Harry Black was 
another in the "wonderful time" 
class. The rattle of corks at Harry's 
table sounded as though the Ger- 
mans were trying to steal Sandy 
Hook. 



made the victims of thieves, and the 
the other day I heard of a fine game 
that was played upon a certain San 
Francisco dealer, who is sensitive 
about having it known he fell for 
the ruse. This is how the game was 
worked. A finely gowned, hand- 
some woman called upon a well- 
known physician, a specialist in 
brain trouble. She told him she 
had a brother who seemed to have 
an hallucination about diamonds. 
Would he, if she could get her 
brother to see him on some pretext, 
talk with him and decide if he 
could be helped? The physician 
said certainly. In leaving her name, 
the lady said she would try and 
arrange the call within an hour or 
two. Soon afterward the hand- 
somely gowned and prosperous- 
looking woman alighted from a fine 
limousine at the jewelry establish- 
ment. She said a relative of hers 
and of her brother-in-law, Dr. So- 
and-So (naming the well-known 
physician) was to be married and 
the families were combining in mak- 
ing a present and she wanted to 
look at some diamond bracelets — 
not too extravagant in price. She 
finally selected three from which to 
choose and said she would like the 
doctor to help her decide. Could 
the jeweler send someone with her 
and the bracelets be taken to the 
doctor's office? Certainly. She said 
she would speak to the doctor over 
the 'phone to ascertain if he could 
see her then. At the 'phone she 
told the office attendant to ask Dr. 
So-and-So if he could see Mrs. Blank 
light away. Answer came back 
"Yes." 

The jeweler's clerk and the custo- 
mer got into the limousine and 
went to the doctor's office, not very 
far away. When it came time for 
the next patient the woman, who 
had the box in her own hand, said 
she would speak to the doctor first 
and went in alone. To the doctor 
she said that her brother was out- 
side and he must be careful and not 



let him talk on the subject of diam- 
onds unless he found it necessary 
to decide on the seriousness of the 
particular hallucination. She went 
out another door and the brother 
was sent for. The brother came in 
and looked about for the "sister-in- 
law," but the physician immedi- 
ately engaged him in conversation 
foreign to the woman and brace- 
lets. The man said: "But those 
diamond bracelets, what did — " 

"Now my man," said the doctor 

To make a longer story shorter, the 
man did get excited over the diam- 
ond question, very much excited, 
and the doctor, seeing him rave, 
had him locked up in a private 
room in his hospital, where he stay- 
ed until the next morning. The 
jeweler did not worry about the 
bracelets. Many times salesmen 
took valuables home with them for 
the night, if they were late in re- 
turning before closing time. The 
woman and the three bracelets have 
not been found. 



GOLF NOTES 

Though Ex-President Taft was no 
great expert in the game of golf, 
golf opinions from him are interest- 
ing. In writing to a friend about 
the sport, Taft says: "Golf is an 
admirable form of exercise. It has 
no bad results except that in the 
outset it may tempt to profanity. 
This, however, is of short duration 
with a man of any sense, because he 
finds that the less he resorts to pro- 
fanity and impatience the better 
his score." 

-X- -X- -X- * 

"In the banquet hall of the Ritz I 
found a score or more fashionable 
persons fussing with a new fad that 
threatens to become a popular and 
permanent winter 1 'morning past- 
time — indoor golf," says a corres- 
pondent in Town Topics, New York 
City. "To my surprise, I found six 
complete driving lanes and a nine 
hole putting green, and the enthus- 
iasts getting their hand in and 
learning new strokes. In one lane 
was George F. Baker with his coat 
off, driving violently against the 
gutta-percha as fast as the boy 
could place the balls before him. In 
the next lane was Mrs. Herb Ham- 
man, trying her level best to wallop 
the cover off the ball. Mrs. Herb 
contends she is keeping her hand 
in for the Southern tournaments. 
Nous verrons. So much energy was 
the Baroness de Meyer using up in 
her driving that at olne tftme I 
thought the ball would go through 
the canvas backstop. Whether the 



He Would Not Have It Known 

Jewelers are continually being 



IZX 



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IMFORTERS OF 

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CAREFUL ATTENTION GIVEN TO SPECIAL ORDER WORK 



279 POST STREET 

NEAR STOCKTON 

Si 



MISS J. GADA 
MISS A. MOELLER 
Phone Garfield 7557 



.".' 



Saturday, January 16, 1915. 

attractive Baroness plays a good 
game on the links or not, judging 
from her exhibition on this partic- 
uular afternoon, she certainly 
knows how to wield a hearty 
stroke. Mrs. Stewart Barney be- 
came so enthused on her first visit 
to the Indoor course while with 
Mrs Stuve Fish and Lota Robinson 
that she has been there every morn- 
ing since, and they say her form has 
improved. Over in one corner was 
a machine that attracted a great 
deal of attention, and was owned 
by the athletic Marion Hollins. 
Marion had just left the scene af- 
ter giving an exhibition to Mrs. C. 
D. Smithers, Countess von Walder- 
see, Mrs. Ned McLean and the Alex- 
ander girls of how it worked in 
measuring the distance of a stroke. 
It is Marion's own invention and 
she has had it patented. Also in the 
group of onlookers was Malcolm 
Stevenson, who watched Marion's 
every move and stirred up the old 
gossip that he is again angling for 
her heart and hand. With Mrs. Ar- 
thur Scott Burden, Mrs. W. Goadby 
Loew, Mrs. Henry H. Rogers, Mrs. 
Charles Auchincloss, Mrs. Ernest 
Iselin and several other prominent 
matrons in attendance every day, 
do you wonder that I say that in- 
door golf will become a fad?" 



gl Telephone Douglas 5712 ff 

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Julius Fppstein 
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225 POWELL ST., SAN FRANCISCO 

Tel. Kearny 3524 and Sutler 1372 




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cross eyes, astigmatism, headache, 
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awarded at California Industrial 
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GEORGE MAYERLE 

Graduate German Expert Optician 

Established 20 Years 

960 Market St., San Francisco 

Opposite the Empress Theatre 

Mayerle Eyewater at Druggists* 

50c; by mail 65c 



.Saturday, January 16, 1915. 



TUB WASP 



9 




C^ey 




Sherlocks En Masque 

While the thousands of gay cou- 
ples, in dazzling carnival attire, 
were reveling in the great whirl ol 
the dance at the Exposition Civic- 
Auditorium ball Saturday night, 
there was none, who knew that 
through the masks of ten of the 
most gaily-dressed men on the floor 
glanced the piercing eyes of city de- 
tectives. 

Attired in fancy dress, their 
features concealed by black 
masks, they mingled with the 
gnat throng of merrymakers and 
kept a careful watch to protect 
the dancers from the nimble-fin- 
gered gentry. 

And if any of these had been in 
the throng, conniving to reap a 
rich harvest from the thousands of 
dollars of diamonds and jewelry 
worn by the dancers, they would 
haVe been escorted from the ball- 
riioin in quick order. 

The most interesting phase of the 
detectives' presence, however, was 
the fact that they were "marked" 
so that one could recognize the 
other through the crowds in spite 
of masquerade attire. 

The necessity of "marking" the de- 
tectives was emphasized at the Ball 
of All Nations. A day prior to that 
occasion, Chief White had called a 
dozen detectives into his office one 
at a time and had confided to each 
that he would be the only sleuth 
on the floor in masquerade dress 
Each man also was warned to say 
nothing of the assignment to his 
fellows and to provide himself with 
a suitable costume and mask. 

So into the crowd of dancers 
sauntered a dozen detectives in 
fancy dress, each ignorant of the 
presence of the others. The night 
passed without trouble but after 
the ball it developed that several 
sleuths had spent considerable time 
shadowing their disguised fellow- 
officers. The "gum-shoeing" of the 
detectives had aroused the suspi- 
cion of their campanions and much 
time was wasted by this unneces- 
sary espionage. 

It was pointed out that such a 
waste of time on another occasion 
might result in insufficient vigilance 
where it was needed. So it was de- 
cided to "label" the sleuths this 
time. 

This was done but only the de- 
tectives themselves knew the "mark- 
ings." Though each of the city's 
Sherlocks donned a different kind 



By John C. Observer. 



oi costume and covered his features 
with a heavy mask, each wore a 
narrow band of white baby ribbon 
around his right arm enoug 

"label" him for his fellOWS. 
# # # * 
Wisdom of the 1915 Officials 
"it's only human to want what 
you can't have." said a prominent 
business man the other day, ex- 
plaining to his friend the wisdom 
of the Exposition heads in closing 

the grounds lor a month before the 

opening. 
".lust because people can't go to 

the grounds they will want to go," 
he continued, "and that will bring 
a great crowd on the opening day- 
more than would have gone if the 

public had 1 n admitted right up 

to the opening." 

About town there seems to be the 
same idea that the heads of the 
Exposition displayed much wisdom 
in closing the gates a little more 
than a month before February 20, 
the opening day. The move is tak- 
en as a first-class display of busi- 
ness ability, a scheme that will be 
as successful as judicious. 

While the Exposition Company 
announced that the gates were clos-, 
ing so that the workmen might 
put on the great mass of finishing 
touches without interruption from 
the crowds of visitors, it is general- 
ly understood that this is but a 
clever way of keeping the public 
from knowing the real reason for 
keeping them from the grounds. 

As a matter of fact, actual con- 
struction work — the only activities 
which visitors might disturb— is 
practically completed. Installation 
of exhibits now is the principal 
work to be done and that is carried 



on within the buildings, where \i-- 
lo not go. 
But this is the reason for closing 

the gates in advance. The Exposi- 
tion must open in a great blaze of 
glory, with a mighty fanfare of 
tl limpets. It must disclose some- 
thing that has not already been 
seen. Its opening must be auspi- 
cious and brilliant; it must climax 
a period of suspense and anxious 
waiting by the public. 

And such a climax best can be 
built up by closing the gates before 
the formal opening. Suspense will 
be created by the curiosity as to 
what is going on inside the walls, 
the people will want what they 
cannot have. A great rush to the 
grounds on the opening will be the 
result. 

* * * -x- 

Passing of Carroll Cook 
In the demise of Carroll Cook, for- 
mer Superior Judge, last week, San 
Francisco loses not only one of her 
most prominent lawyers but one of 
her most interesting figures. A suc- 
cessful career had brought Cook in- 
to great prominence and many in- 
teresting sidelights on his work 
were related this week by those 
who knew him best. 

While this was not generally 
known, it appears that Cook, who 
for years was counsel for the Chi- 
nese Six Companies, maintained in 
his suite of offices an Oriental room 
in which he consulted with and 
advised his large Celestial clientele. 
Aside from the' Orientals, only 
Cook's most intimate friends knew 
of the room. Its furnishings are 
said to have represented thousands 
of dollars. The furniture was of 
carved ebony, ivories stood about 



\ 



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We carry a full line of Japanese 
Silks, Kimonos, Mandarin 




Coats, Linen Goods, etc. 




MAIN STORE 




157 GEARY STREET 




Bet. Stockton and Grant Ave. 




Phone Douglas 4626 




SAN FRANCISCO, CALIFORNIA 




111 E. COLORADO ST. 




Pasadena, Cal. 




Factory Office: Yokohama, Japan. 



on costly shelves and tables, while 
the walls were hung with wondrous 
i.il silken draperies. 
tn a corner of the office stood a 
tea table, with cups and tiny stove. 
Chi -e tobacco was there aplenty 

and the |rounse(lor (with his al- 
mond -eyed clients refreshed them- 
selves while discussing grave mi 
t ion s ,,f law. 

Judge Cook also was known for 
his fearlessness, which he displayed 
in one instance while on the Supe- 
rior bench, when he sentenced to 
fifty years each four hold-up men 
who had been captured not long 
after the fire of 1906. Unusual pres- 
sure had been exerted for leniency 
but the Judge was determined to 
set an example. 

He prided himself, too, during his 
legal career, that of the sixty-four 
murderers he had defended not 
one went to the gallows. 
# * * * 

Chief White's Sunday Jaunt 
A five-mile walk through heavy 
rain and mud, a fancy cocktail that 
was pure vinegar, and a chase 
through the slush for his famous 
black Stetson were a few of the 
troubles of Chief of Police White 
at a Sunday jaunt a week ago, in 
which a number of well-known San 
Franciscans participated. Inciden- 
tally they spared no laughs at the 
Chief's expense and White became 
the good-humored target of his 
friends' fun. 

Their host was Ed Buckley, well- 
known State Wharfinger, whose 
country place at Lagunitas is fa- 
mous as the scene of many a jolly 
Sunday dinner. Buckley had in- 
vited his friends on this particular 
occasion and in several machines 
they rode through the rain and 
mud to Lagunitas. 

In the party were Chief White, 
Superior Judge George Sturtevant, 
Max Goldberg, former police com- 
missioner, Morris Levy, former 
grand jury secretary and secretary 
of Beth Israel Congregation, Attor- 
ney Joseph Taaffe, Thomas Cashin, 
superintendent of the city's street 
cars, and a number of others promi- 
nent in city life. 

Chief White and Goldberg, in a 
small runabout, were the last in 
the line of machines. In fact, they 
were so far behind the others that 
when their car became stalled. 
White and Goldberg, sheltered 
from the blinding rain only by 
headgear that has made each fa- 
mous, were forced to walk five miles 
to Buckley's place. 

It was a drenched pair that put 
into Lagunitas several hours be- 
hind the others. "Here's to Gus 
White: he's a jolly good fellow," 
shouted the crowd with upraised 
glasses, as the Chief and Goldberg 
appeared. 

Glasses were tendered the late- 
comers. They drank the toast: — but 
with vinegar. 

The laugh had hardly died away 
when a gust of wind took White's 
big Stetson off his head and over 
the muddy road. 

The head of the city's finest gave 

(Continued on Page 18) 



10 



THE WASP 



Saturday, January 16, 1915. 




FORBES ROBERTSON, THE MAN 
(By Billee Glynn) 

The gentlest and most unassum- 
ing of men is Forbes Robertson, tht 
truly great English actor. When I 
entered his room at the St. Francis 
he was at his writing desk. He 
turned his head with the kindest 
of greetings. There is no other ac- 
tor who looks so much like his pic- 
tures. His voice is deep with a pow- 
er of music. His whole bearing ex- 
pressed simplicity and fellowship. 
He has the quietness of great art, 
though he did disclaim being much 
of a painter. But he had done por- 
traits, he said, and sometimes land- 
scapes. He offered me a cigarette 
from a bountiful silver case of them. 
We gossiped away until his brother 
came in. Forbes Robertson greeted 
him with these words, "I am glad to 
see you; take off your coat." There 
was beautiful consideration in the 
tone. It was not just courtesy— it 
was meant. And undoubtedly he 
has seen this brother every day of 
his tour, this brother who looks so 
much like him and is a very fine 
fellow. It is just that which makes 
the genius of Forbes Robertson so 
poignant. In all the fuss and sord- 
idness of life he keeps his spirit 
beautiful in all circumstances. It is 
real with him because that is his 
soul. Beauty is the one thing worth 
while in life and he knows it. He 
could commune with a rose in the 
midst of a multitude. 



THE RIALTO 



campaign against cigarettes. Curi- 
ous habit!— each citizen adding his 
little mite to the activities of the 
smoking chimneys to obscure heav- 
en and increase laundry bills. And 
here, too, we can remember when 
laundry bills were comparatively 
modest in this city of San Francis- 
co. 

We are sometimes guilty ourselves 
but can nevertheless wonder that 
this desire to emit smoke should 
have become so universal among 
men and tend more and more to be 
held an accomplishment among wo- 
men. Do you remember how we 
used to shudder, reader of an older 
generation, when Hazel Kirke lit 
the villain's cigarette for him; and 
the villain would have shuddered 
himself if Hazel had attempted to 
smoke it. And observe also that an 
increasing proportion of these cig- 
arettes are Turkish— at least so it 
says on the box. Are we in danger, 
as some morallists more than hint, 
of becoming Turkish in our morals? 
Are we imbibing Turkish morality, 
or lack of it, with our Turkish to- 
bacco, not because it is necessarily 
Turkish but because we are hypno- 
tized into that belief by the word 
of the manufacturers? 

A friend suggests an explanation. 
The cigarette is a visible symbol 
that the smoker has money to 
burn; and the desire to have money 
for this purpose is a widespread 
ambition. The rapidity with which 
the cigarette burns up makes the 
sensation of having money to burn 
especially satisfying the young and 
unthinking. 



We can remember the time when 
it became "good form," irrespective 
of the opinion of other pedestrians, 
for the goodness of form is often 
subtly achieved without visible ex- 
planation, to smoke a pipe on the 
street in San Francisco. There was 
an undercurrent of belief among the 
young that Englishmen smoked 
pipes on the street, a habit hitherto 
unnoticed by American observers; 
and, as it is never too late to follow 
a bad example, pipes blossomed on 
our thoroughfares like the flowers 
in the Union Square. But now, 
more and more, we observe the cig- 
arette superseding the pipe even 
the unescapable advertisers of "joy 
smokes" carry themselves like a 
weathervane and point out that 
the same tobacco that is so unbe- 
lievably fragrant, wholesome and 
without that fiery effect upon the 
tongue which marks all other to- 
baccos, is equally wonderful whetn- 
er you smoke it in what they 
strangely call a "Jimmy" pipe — 
suggesting a combination of smok- 
ing apparatus and burglar's tool— 
or roll it in a refreshing cigarette. 
And all this in spite of the long 



GLAD TO BE OUT 

I met a newspaper man on the 
street the other day and he was in 
that high state which we call "on 
his uppers." Yet he was happy, su- 
premely happy. In fact, I had nev- 
er seen such a look of joy on his 
face before. At first glance I 
thought that he had imbibed too 
freely. But this was not so, even 
his breath was untainted. For a 
newspaper man to be happy, sober, 
and out of work all at the same 
time was in my experience incom- 
prehensible. Consequently I inter- 
viewed him. 

"Hello," I said, "have you fallen 
into a fortune, or like our old 
friend Hunt did you marry a widow 
with millions?" 

He denied both implications but 
did not explain himself. So I in- 
vited him in to have a drink. 

"Now what is it?" I asked in the 
pause after imbibing. 

"Well, I will tell you, old man," 
he confided. "I have been a sport- 
ing editor for five years now. I 
have worked most of the time be- 
cause I have written what they 
wanted me to write. Every pug in 
the land with the brains of a vege- 
table, I have been press agent for 
and exploited continually. I have 
written these boobs from a thou- 



sand angles. The power of my pub- 
licity has made fortunes for five- 
dollar brains. And all the time I 
felt disgraced as a man condemned 
to drag a chain. If ever once I 
could have stated my mind about 
these fellows and their howitzer- 
mouthed promoters and bull-pull- 
ing managers, I would have cut the 
outfit to bits and bagged it in an 
undertow. But no sporting editor 
can ever be himself. He is part of 
the game he plays and nothing 
more. That is the reason I am glad 
I am through, glad that the game 
has been killed and that I am well 
out of it. I realize the monkey it 
made of me. There is scarcely any- 
thing I would not rather do for a 
living. 




She Knew Napoleon 
Mrs. Hannah Kosokoff, reported 
to be the oldest woman in the Un- 
ited States, died recently at the age 
of 117 years in the Home of the 
Daughters of Israel. She was born 
in Kovno, Russia, in 1797. She was 
possessed of a wonderful memory, 
and used to give graphic descrip- 
tions of Napoleon's invasion of Rus- 
sia. She said she had been decorat- 
ed by one of the czars for saving a 
number of women from drowning. 
She survived her husband and all 
of her children. She came here from 
Russia in 1881. She was buried in 
the shroud she made when sixty- 
five years old. 



Under-Water War 

The difficulties that confront the 
officers and crew of a submarine 
during actual warfare is described 
as follows: The captain of the sub- 
marine must lie in wait for his 
quarry with the nose of his boat 
pointing in the direction in which 
he expects the enemy's vessel to 
pass. Then he has to estimate the 
speed of the approaching ship and 
her distance, and to fire his tor- 
pedo at the point at which he cal- 
culates she will have arrived when 
the torpedo has finished its run. 
Probably he will discharge another 
torpedo a few seconds later to make 
doubly sure. Admiral Bacon, 

an experienced handler of submar- 
ines, says: "If any of your readers 
wish to appreciate some of the dif- 
ficulties of submarine work, let him 
sit down under a chart of the Chan- 
nel suspended from the ceiling, let 
him punch a hole through it, and 
above the hole place a piece of 
looking-glass inclined at forty-five 
degrees. Let him further imagine 
his chair and glass moving sideways 
as the effect of tide, let him occa- 
sionally fill the room with steam to 
represent mist. Let him finally 
crumple the chart into ridges to 
represent the waves, and then try 
to carry out some of the manoeuvers 
that look so simple when the chart 
is spread out on the table and look- 
ed down upon in the quiet solitude 
of a well-lit study." 




v. ,v. . . 

i 



Headquarters 
PRACTICAL 

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THE 



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Monthly Payments if Desired 
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thing — unquestionably the best in 
pianos is the world-famed Knabe. 

If you wish to regard only quality, 
then we present to you the Knabe 
"Ampico" Player Piano. The 

' 'Ampico' ' Player combines the ut- 
most ease of pedaling and every re- 
finement of expression devices, in- 
cluding the marvelous Flexotone. The 
Knabe ' 'Ampico' ' is especially con- 
structed for those who want the ab- 
solute best regardless of price. 

Your present Piano accepted as 
part payment. 



26 O'Farrell Street 

Oakland Store 473 12th Street 

Bacon Block 



Saturday, January 16, IMS. 

THE SPORTSMAN'S NOTEBOOK 
By Nimrod 

The automobile lias banished the 
horse from his ancient prominence 
in the gloomy pageantry of war, 
but there is still an honored use 
fulness for our fourfooted friend in 
the liaj>|iy hunting grounds of 
sport. 

For instance is there any fear of 
the polo pony being eliminated by 
a mere contrivance. In a few weeks 
scores of these spirited debonair 
wholly Irresistible little animals 

also their owners, will be enter- 
taining the San Francisco public. 
For the first time in history the 
best polo in the world is to be seen 
here. Great Britain. India and oth- 



TI1E WASP 



elan, will have much chance of Van- 
quishing these invaders. Such a 
combination as P. s. Von Stade, 0. 
Perry Beadleston, C. C. Rumsey 
and Malcolm Stevenson, heroes of 
innumerable 4blg games at Long 

Island. Narrangansctt and other fa- 
mous fields COUld travel far and re- 
main unbeaten. Hut the dauntless 
spirit of California has achieved the 
apparently Impossible ore now. No- 
where is courage more potent than 
in the polo field. 

* * * * # 

Who will represent San .Mateo.' 
This is the most discussed question 
of the moment. There cannot be 
much doubt about three places on 
the team but a strenuous eompeti- 




Richard M. Tobin 



er parts of the world, where polo 
is usually popular and prevalent, 
America are despatching their best 
teams to us. Thus this city will 
be a veritable hub of the pastime of 
princes. 

The champions of America, the 
famous Coopertown four, will be 
here. At the time of writing they 
are momentarily expected at Coro- 
nado. After participating in the 
tournament there they will drift 
North in time to enter the San Ma- 
teo competition, which manager 
Harry Hastings expects will begin 
about March 30. 

* * -X- * -K- 

It is to be feared that no team to 
be marshalled among the local men, 
with all their pluck and Western 



N.Warshauer 



F.Warshauer 



Warshauer Brothers 

TAILORS 



49 Geary Street 

SAN FRANCISCO 



tion has developed for the fourth. 
The dazzling Deveraux, Tom Dris- 
coll and Walter Hobart, three of 
the original "Slashers" squadron, 
will again be in the saddle. Richard 
Tobin finds the cares of commerce 
too urgent to permit the necessary 
practice. There are a half doz- 
en possibilities for the vacant posi- 
tion. Cheever Cowdin, member of 
a polo playing family with a large 
experience of European and East- 
ern polo, Tevis one of the players, 
who has come along a lot during 
the last few months, and a number 
of others are in the running. 

Billy Breeze, who might have 
acheived a place on the team has 
gained a commission in a crack 
British Yoemany corps and is prob- 
ably fighting in Flanders by now. 

The Coronado team with the well- 
mounted Weiss brothers in align- 
ment and the powerful Pasadenean 
four will provide anxious after- 
noons for all opponents. But there 
is no doubt that if San Francisco 
can defeat Cooperstown, they will 

elope with the honors. 
-;:- -::- -x- * -x- 

Those who predicted that the en- 
thusiasm of Americans for golf was 
but a passing phase, must be am- 
azed at the latest developments. 




New clubs continue to be layed out 
all over the United States land- 
scape and the end is not yet. A 
new course, the extension of an old 
one and 250 players every Sunday 
at the municipal links at Lincoln 
Park, are some of the symtoms of 
the growth of the game in the San 
Francisco section. The Sequoyah 
County Club at Elmhurst will soon 
be at the disposal of knights of the 
eleek. The links have been de- 
signed to provide a thoroughly ex- 
acting test of skill. It has been 
claimed that the coast courses were 
too easy. Vardon and Wray point- 
ed this out, when they were here. 
These great players had many nice 
things to say about California, but 
contended that supreme golf would 
never be played by the man in this 
territory until the links were ren- 
dered more difficult. This tip has 
been taken. The Ingleside holes 
are being extended so that the Na- 
tional Championship may take 
place there for the trophies award- 
ed by the Exposition authorities. 
The course is at present 4000 yards 
in extent. The regulations demand 
6,100 and the club committee plans 
provide for links slightly in excess 
of this. Ingleside has always been 
what is known as a "sporty" course. 
Men who can play on it well will 
score anywhere. The vistas of land 
and seas it affords will captivate 
every visitor into being a whole 
hearted worshiper of California. 



There will be no Davis Cup games 
for tennis players this year. All 
America's possible opponents are 
fighting in the war. This fact will 
lend importance to the contests of 
the Panama Pacific trophies. For 
the first time the Easterners will 
have to come and play Californians 
at home. Norris Williams of Har- 
vard, national champion, is cer- 
tain to be here. This young man 
flabbergasted the world last sum- 
mer by beating McLoughlin and 
taking the title. If tennis was a 
game that inspired gambling it is 
safe to say that every Californian, 
who can distinguish the playing 
end of a raquet from the handle 
would be willing to wager his last 
dollar that the result could not 
be repeated. Last year McLoughlin 
had defeated the two greatest play- 
ers in the world, Brookes and Wild- 
ing. He had attained a pinnacle of 
skill, some think it has never been 
reached before. The national cham- 



11 



pionship came as an anti-climax 
When the Californian was stale. 

: ::■ •::- ■::- 

CHINESE AGENTS RISKY 

Great care should be taken in the 
choice of agents in China to repre- 
sent American firms. A representa- 
tive of a large American concern 
recently stated that his company 
had given the agency for its pro- 
ducts to a large and reputable 
European house in China, which 
had sent the American plans, 
prices, etc., to its European con- 
nections for use in making up com- 
petitive figures. 

It is said, too, that foreign firms 
sometimes accept agencies for Amer- 
ican goods to keep American firms 
out of the field or to obtain models 
for imitation. It would seem, ac- 
cording to Mr. Arnold, that unless 
American manufacturers are in a 
position to know that the foreign 
firms with whom they would in- 
trust their agencies will properly 
represent them, it would be better 
to intrust agencies to American 
firms only. 



The week at both the Hotel Cecil 
and Somerton was a very lively one. 
There was the weekly card party on 
Monday evening at the Cecil, and 
on Friday night there was the first 
in a series of dancing classes to be 
held every Friday evening at both 
hotels. Also there are to be dinner 
dances at each hotel every Saturday 
night. 

Among the prominent folk regis- 
tered there the last week were Mrs. 
W. S. Porter, Hugh Porter, Mrs. 
Charles Walker of Salt Lake City, 
General and Mrs. E. J. McClermand, 
U. S. A., Colonel F. C. Fauntleroy, 
TJ S A., Miss Edith Bull and Mrs. 
Charles Walker of Salt Lake City. 



IMPORTANT NOTICE 

The editorial and business offices 
of The Wasp have been moved to 
The Bankers Investment Building, 
49 Geary Street. The telephone num- 
ber has been changed to Douglas 
1871. 

^ Phone Douglas 5370 

| M. E. GALLAGHER 

& 

n Fancy, Street, Reception and Evening 

I GOWNS 

O (5* <5* <5* 

<§ WEDDING TROUSSEAUX 

$ .t ,t .* 

& 96-97 Whittell Bldg., 166 Geary St. 

fSan Francisco. 

I The "Frances" 

I HAIRDBESSING AND 

| MANICUEING PAELOBS. 
| 110 GBABY STREET, 

ig Purchased and Now Conducted by 

I Tffrs. &. Williams c 

w Formerly Manager Hair Diessing f? 
« Dept., The Emporium. % 



12 



THE TV' ASP 



Saturday, January 16, 1915. 



IGNORING THE COURTS 

The contempt that people of a 
certain type have tor the courts and 
judges in San Francisco, is no bet- 
ter shown than in the attack made 
upon Mr. Charles H. Marshall by R. 
E. Mulcahy on January second in 
the St. Francis hotel. By taking 
the law into his own hands, Mul- 
cahy showed a flagrant disregard 
for law and justice. Evidently he 
did not care to take any chances 
with the courts in the matter of se- 
curing a hearing for his grievances. 

There has been a great deal of 
talk about this class of people who 
seem unwilling to rest their cases 
with the courts. They offend jus- 
tice by their actions, for by taking 
the law into their own hands, they 
prove that they have neither faith 
in their own cause or in the courts 
which administer the law. The po- 
lice and the entire machinery of law 
is maintained for the protection of 
the public. Judges are belittled, 
and the courts made to appear 
weak and inefficient when men like 
Mulcahy ignore their existence. 

Mr. Marshall is still confined to 
his bed under the care of a doctor 
and trained nurse. The blow he re- 
ceived, when Mulcahy struck him 
over the head with his cane, was a 
severe one and according to expert 
medical opinion came close to being 
fatal. 

Because of his prominence, Mul- 
cahy should be made to suffer for 
his cowardly attack. An example 
should be made of him, and a pen 
alty meted out that would serve as 
warning to everybody. Any news- 
paper that has the courage to tell 
the truth should be given the unit- 
ed support of the public, so that 
these attacks upon newspaper men 
cease. The press of San Francisco 
has been throttled for the past 
decade, and the little truth that 
has been published has been so di- 
luted that it has done more harm 
than good. It is time now that con- 
ditions change. 



Thomas A. Edison says: "It has 
surprised me to see how the Ameri- 
cans have become weak-kneed over 




SoriE ARE BORN TO GREATNESS: SOME --ETC. 

THE MONEY MAKERS 

(By X-WALL) 



this war. They seem to be stricken 
with a sort of commercial paralysis. 
They want to get out and do some- 
thing and now is the opportune 
time. Why you can put up a build- 
ing cheaper today than you could 
before the war and yet many of our 
supposed good business men will 
wait until the war is over for a sign 
of prosperity and pay more for the 
building. The wise man will pre- 
pare for the boom in trade that 
we will soon experience and which 
will be tremendous after the war. 

"I think the increase in railroad 
rates is justifiable. It will mean 
thousands of dollars more a year for 
me to ship my freight, but I will 
get that back threefold, for the rail- 
roads are the promoters of national 
prosperity. You interfere with the 
arteries of commerce and then you 
are doing something that is dan- 
gerous. 

"The Federal Reserve Act has al- 
ready proved its value and I think 
President Wilson has made him- 
self clear as to his attitude toward 
business. To date I think he has 
done very well." 



Vagaries of Exports 

When the figures of foreign trade 
for the present fiscal year come to 
be tabulated there are likely to be 
a number of transitions. Enough al- 
ready is apparent to show that 
there is a vast difference between 
the amounts shipped to certain 



THE ANGLO & LONDON PARIS 
NATIONAL BANK 



SAN FRANCISCO 




Capital 5 4,000,000 

Surplus and Profits. 1,600,000 
Total Resources. . . . 40,000,000 

OFFICERS: 

Herbert Fleischhacker President 

Sig. Greenebaum. .Chairman of Board 
Washington Dodge... Vice-President 

J. Friedlander Vice-President 

C. F. Hunt Vice-President 

R. Altschul Cashier 

C. R. Parker Assistant Cashier 

Wm. H. High Assistant Cashier 

H. Choynski Assistant Cashier 

G. R. Enrdick... .Assistant Cashier 
G. F. Herr .... Assistant . Cashier 
A. L. Langerman Secretary 



countries and the ultimate destina- 
tion of those shipments. If British 
ports were blockaded as have been 
those of Germany and Austria, the 
disparity would be very much 
greater . It has, of course, long 
been known that the great ports of 
Germany have been distributing 
places for a tremendous quantity 
of goods from different countries. 
Germany has profited by this as toll 
was taken in one way or another 
on every pound or yard of stuff 
that came in. American products 
in large quantity have been among 
these things that were simply trans- 
shipped to other nations. But this 
method of transport has made Ger- 
many figure to a larger extent than 
it legitimately ought as an import- 
er of American goods. The war has 
partly put a stop to this kind of 
business and, while exports to Ger- 
many will show a large drop, it is 
likely that much of these outbound 
shipments will show up in the new 
tabulations properly credited to 
the countries of ultimate destina- 
tion. These latter will include par- 
ticularly Russia, the Scandinavian 
countries and several others, even, 
curiously enough, including Great 
Britain. 

* -x- * -x- # 

Federal Reserve Resources 
The last weekly New York state- 
ment of the condition of the Feder- 
al Reserve Banks, shows an 
increase of $1,693,000 in total re- 
sources, which was brought about 
mainly by the larger amounts of re- 
serve in the hands of the New York 
bank. Net deposits show a gain 
equally large, cash resources a slight 
increase, and rediscounts a decrease 
of about $500,000. Little change is 
shown in the figures of net circu- 
lation of Federal Reserve notes, 
though reports from the reserve 
agents indicate that almost $3,000,- 
000 additional notes were issued to 
banks during the week. 

Because of the larger amounts of 
gold and lawful money deposited 
with the Federal Reserve agents 
and of the larger amounts of notes 
in the hands of the banks them- 
selves, their net liability on account 
of these notes shows a decrease from 
$3,856,000 to $1,407,000 a week ago.. 
Deposits shown are net, exclusive of 
$5,700,000 in transit between the sev- 
eral banks. 



High 

Grade 

Municipals 

Free from tlie expense and annoy- 
ance of the Federal 

Income Tax 

Byrne & 
McDonnell 



NEW YORK, NEWARK, 
SAN FRANCISCO 



Merchants Exhange Bldg. 
San Francisco, California 



The German Savings 
and Loan Society 

(THE GERMAN BANK) 
Savings Commercial 

Incorporated 1868 
626 California Street San Francisco 

Cal. 

Member of the Associated Savings 

Banks of San Francisco. 

The following Branches for Receipt 
and Payment of Deposits only: 
Mission Branch, S. E. corner Mission 

and 21st Streets. 
Richmond District Branch, S. W. cor- 
ner Clement and 7th Ave. 
Haight Street Branch, S. W. corner 
Laight and Belvedere. 

June 30th, 1914: 

Assets $58,656,635.13 

Capital actually paid up 

in Cash 1,000,000.00 

Reserve and Contingent 

Funds 1,857,717.65 

Employees' Pension 

Fund 177,868.71 

Number of Depositors 66,367 

Office hmirs: 10 o'clock A. M. to 
3 o'clock P. M., except Saturdays to 
12 o'clock M. and Saturday evenings 
from 6 o'clock P. M. to 8 o'clock P. 
M. for receipt of deposits only. 

For the 6 months ending June 
30lh, 1914, a dividend to depositors 
of 4 per cent per annum was de- 
clared. 



Wells Fargo Nevada 
National Bank 

Of San Francisco 

Nevada Bank Building, 2 Montgomery St., 
N. E. Corner of Market St. 

Capital Paid Up $6,000,000.00 

Surplus & Undivided Profits 5,148,628.93 



Total $11,148,628.93 

OFFICERS. 

Isai&B W. Hellman, President 
I. W. Hellman, Jr., Vice-Prea. 
F L. Lipman, Vice-Pres 
James K Wilson, Vice-Pres. 
Frank B. King, Cashier. 
C. L. Jacobs, Assistant Cashier 
W. McGavin, Assistant Cashier 
C. L. Davis, Assistant CaBhier 
A. D. Oliver, Assistant Cashier 
A. B. Price, Assistant Cashier 
DIRECTORS. 

Isaiaa W. Ilellmau 1. W. Hellman. Jr. 

Joseph Sloss 

Percy T Morgan 

F. W. Van Sicklen 

Wm F. Herrin 

John C. Kirk pa trick 

J. Henry Meyer 

A. H Payson 



A. Christeaon 
Wm. Haas 
Hartland Law 
Henry Rosenfeld 
James L. Flood 
Chas. J. Deering 
James K Wilson 



F L, Lipman 

ACCOUNTS INVITED 

Prompt Service, Courteous Attention, Un 

excelled Facilities. 

SAFE DEPOSIT VAULTS 



Saturday. January 16, 1915. 



THE 'WASP 



13 




Merriment and good cheer reign- 
ed at the annual holiday jinks of 
tin- Bohemian Club, which took 
place Saturday night, for the mein- 
bera only. Under the direction of 
a special committee, an unusual 
program of music, literary numbers, 
and "stunts" had been arranged. 
and from the beginning of the af- 
fair to its elose, there was not a 
single dull moment. 

A large crowd of members had 
gathered and the jinks was declar- 
ed the best ever held. 

On Friday evening John Barrett. 
director-general of the Pan-Ameri- 
can Union, was entertained by 
friends at dinner at the Bohemian 
Club. 

* -x- * # 

The January soeial of the Papy- 
rus Club will take place next Wed- 
nesday afternoon at the Sutter- 
street clubroom. The committee in 
charge has prepared an interesting 
program, a feature of which will be 
the presentation of a sketch. "Our 
Aunt from California." Members of 
the club will participate. 

On last Wednesday the club held 
its New Year's greeting luncheon. 
The affair was informal and proved 
a marked success. 

-X- * -X- * 

Rcdfern Mason delivered an in- 
teresting lecture on "Oriental Mu- 
sic" before the Caedmon Assembly 
last Tuesday at the Fairmont hotel. 
He analysed the music of the Far 
East and told of its distinguishing 
characteristics. 

-X- -X- -X- -X 

A marvel of dazzling pageantry, 
with gaily attired men and women 
rollicking in buffoonery, is being 
planned by the Press Club of San 




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SOCIETY'S NEWEST 

^This is to let ike readers of the Wasp j j 
^noiv about society's newest member— 

SAiorgyrw'SPECIAL I'J 
BRUSH-END Cigarettes 

Ultra-individual, and rather expensive . 
Nlade entirely by hand and separately 
wrapped m silver joil to preserve fresh- 
ness andjlavor. J\t clubs and 
the belter stands - 23c. 



Francisco tor its "Nine fears After" 
show, which Is to take place In the 
municipal auditorium on Saturday 

evening. April 17. Already elabo- 
rate preparations tor the affair have" 

been made, costumes have been or- 
dered, and plans worked out to 
make the show one of the greatest 
oi Its kind ever held here. 

.Mure than one thousand men 
and women will participate and 
tin-re will be horses by the dozen 
in the pageant. The riders of the 
various nations will be seen and 
prominent society matrons are to 
take the roles of queen of each 
country represented. 

In charge of arrangements is a 
committee consisting of Clyde C. 
Webster (chairman), Waldemar de 
Biile, Peter B. Kyne, William H. 
Barry, Arthur Bennett, W. R. Dav- 
enport, Thomas F. Boyle and H. H. 
I lempsey. 

The show will be repeated on 
May Day. which has been set aside 
as "Press Club Day" at the Panama- 
Pacific Exposition. 

"The Scoop," the annual publica- 
tion of the club, is to make its ap- 
pearance in February. Frankling 
R. Morse, editor, promises a record- 
breaking issue. 



A lecture on the architectural as- 
pect of the Panama-Pacific Exposi- 
tion by Mrs. M. C. James of Berke- 
ley, was one of the entertainment 
features of the Philomath Club's 
regular meeting Monday afternoon, 
held at the Sorosis clubrooms, 536 
Sutter street. The lecture was il- 
lustrated by stereopticon views. 
Frank Louis Frick, barytone, was 
heard in a number of selections. 
Considerable business of impor- 
tance was transacted. 



Members of the Cap and Bells 
Club reveled at their annual high 
jinks last Thursday afternoon in 
their clubrooms, 315 Sutter street. 
Music, dancing, and literary num- 
bers made up an unusually enjoy- 
able program 



THE WOMAN BEAUTIFUL 



"Perhaps it is best, after all," re- 
marked the rejected suitor, as he 
lingered in the hall. "A man of 
twenty-five would soon tire of a 
wife who hovered round the thirty- 
two mark." 

"Why, Mr. Ardent," said the wo- 
man in the case, "how many ungal- 
lant of you to insinuate that I am 
thirty-two." 

"Well, perhaps not." he replied, 
"but it struck me that you were 
somewhere near the freezing-point." 




By Catharine Carroll 

Compensation for Suffrage 

Not long ago I asked a man high 
up in the councils of the Republi- 
can party, in fact lie is the highest 
in California, to give me his reasons 
for voting for suffrage for women. 
His answer was: "I had no logical 
reason and I really believe very few 
men had any more serious one than 
I had, viz., 1 thought women want- 
ed it and men have always given 
women pretty much all they have 
asked for." 



At one of the women's political 
clubs I heard a candidate for the 
Senatorial toga in a silvery tongued 
voice remind the women present 
that he had always advocated the 
suffrage for them and he hoped 
they would study the political situ- 
ation carefully and vote for the men 
who had worked for suffrage, other- 
wise these unselfish men might feel 
that they had by assisting women 
to obtain the suffrage put into 
their hands an instrument with 
which they might "smite" the be- 
fore-mentioned unselfish gentlemen. 

* X- -X- * -X- 

But now the men who gave wom- 
en the franchise are seeking com- 
pensation, not only in political sup- 
port, but they are exposing the 
"nigger in the woodpile" by trying 
to introduce some new laws which 
will put women absolutely on the 
same footing with men politically 
and economically, without any re- 
gard to the moral obligation of 
man to woman. 

* -X * * * 

Loss of Alimony 

Should this proposed Alimony 
law go through men will be practi- 
law absolved from mental and fin- 
ancial responsibility unless chil- 
dren should result from the union. 

-X -X -X- -X -X 

This law is manifestly unjust to 
women. Under the most favorable 
conditions women are seldom, if 
ever, physically fit to compete with 
men in the wage-earning arena. 

X- * -X- # * 

Nature constructed women prin- 
cipally for child-bearing and gave 
to them the mental and physical 



Select Assort- 
ment of fine 
candies and 
patisserie. 
********** 



Telephones 

Douglas 3266 
Douglas 3267 




French Confectioner/ 



Ice cream to 
order. Wedding 
cakes and 
cream cakes a 
specialty. 

********** 




211 Powell Street 
San Francisco, California 



requirements and instinct for that 
work. 

***** 

When a woman marries she usu- 
ally, even if there are no children. 
devotes her time, not to learning 
how in be self-supporting, but to 
household duties and furthering 
the interests of her husband while 
lie i- daily adding to his earning 
capacity. 

***** 

Very few women leave their hus- 
bands until after their feelings and 
nerves are so outraged by mistreat- 
ment that they can endure no mine. 
***** 

To pass a law allowing a man to 
go free of financial responsibility 
and thereby compelling a woman 
after years, or even months, of mis- 
treatment to earn her own living. 
or starve, at a time when she is 
least able mentally or physically to 
do it is the quintesence of concen- 
trated cruelty. 

-X- * * * * 

Marriage is not just a legal con- 
tract but it is a sacrament and a 
moral obligation. 

-X- -X- -X- -X * 

It looks very much as if the suff- 
ragettes had unwitting thrown a 
boomerang, and that the women, 
now that we are getting our exact 
legal rights, are going to long for 
the good old day when we had 
"privileges," were supposed to be 
"clinging vines," and faint at the 
sight of a mouse. 

-X * -X- * -X- 

The "clinging vine" type of a wom- 
an has often turned a weak-kneed 
sapling of a man into a very good 
imitation of a sturdy oak. 



Fluff— I wonder what's Eureka 
silver mine stock selling for now. 

Ruff — I heard yesterday that the 
promoters had just sold the last 
ten rolls of it for wallpaper. 



For Health, Strength 

Damiana Bitters 

Naber, Alfa & Brune, Agents. 

836 HOW ABO STREET 

Opposite New Montgomery Street 



WANTED ! 

Diamonds Pearls 

HIGHEST CASH VALUE PAID 

PAWN TICKETS BOUGHT 

Phil. Schuman, Whitney Bldg., 133 

Geary Street, Eoom 524. 

Tel. Douglas 4125. 



iinmiiiiiiniiiiiiniiiimiiit 



Phone Douglas 4393 



g MME. H. E. EURDELL. Corsetiero. g 

1 TH[ CORSET SHOP 1 

= EXCLUSIVE AGENTS = 

I 1 

1 BEIN JOLIE, LA PEINOESSE and j§ 

HENDERSON COESETS. g 



s 210 Stockton St., bet. Geary & Post = 
San Francisco. = 

_ %niiiiNiiiiiiiiiiiiiniiiiiiiiii^//i»^iiiiiiiniiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiuii«^ 



14 



THE WASP 



Saturday, January 16, 1915. 




HEOIAU : TAVERN. 



Cor. Eddy and Powell StB. 
Phone Douglas 4700 

A HIGH-CLASS 
FAMILY CAFE 

Where patrons are constantly surrounded 

hv an air of refinement and respectability 

Informal Dansant Every Evening' at 

Nine Except Sunday 

Under the management of 

A. C. MORKISSON 



JHHUiiiiHimiiiiniiiiiiiiMHiiiiiiiiimnniiiiiinmmim 



Portola-Louvrc 

RESTAURANT 

Powell at Market Sts. 

0. O. Swanberg, Pres. and 
Gen. Mgr. 
J. E. Alexander, Mgr. 
After TheaUe 
Supper and | 
Dansant 
Wednesday 
and Friday 
Evenings at 9:' 
A Glimpse 
into Bohemia. 
Entertainment 
Tilling 

P0HTOU- 
LOUVRE 

The Temple of 
San Francisco's 
Gaiety. 




Ti[|iiiHiiiiiMMiiiNiiiiiiiMiiimnnmimn_iiii[iiiiiiiiMi)n 



J.-B. Pon J. Bergez 0. Lalanne 

O. Mailhebuau L. Coutard 

Bergcz- Frank's 

OLD 

..Poodle Dog.. 

Hotel Co. 

and 

Restaurant 

Music and Entertainment Every Evening 

416-421 BTJSH STEEET 

(Above Kearny) 

6 AN FRANCISCO, CAL. 

Exchange Douglas 2411 




FEDERAL CLUB 

32 TURK STEEET 

San Francisco's Popular' Rendezvous 

for Sportsmen 

Dance Hall Buffet 



THE TATTLER 

(Continued from Page 5) 
ty dollars a month salary to pay 
for her engagement presents. 

In the light of justice, Judge 
Sturtevant's decision that these two 
people must go for all time bound 
together and yet, as he character- 
ized them, not fit to live with one 
another, is one which harks back 
to the days of barbarism. 

Opportunism is the cry of the 
hour. Not in the narrow sense is 
this meant, but in the great broad 
truth that every human being has 
the right to freedom, to that free- 
dom which permits us all to begin 
every day anew, to shake hands 
with the opportunity that is await- 
ing us as we awaken every morning. 

However, the lady may have some 
cause for jubilancy in the end, as 
Dr. Long is the heir to a portion 
of the Long Syrup and Refining 
Company. He has had two strokes 
of paralysis. She may live to be a 
rich, young widow. 

A Fine Woman 

I have heard a very charming 
little bit about Mrs. William H. 
Crocker the other day. I had gone 
to the corner of Stockton and Geary 
streets to purchase some lavendar 
from the little old man who takes 
his daily stand there. As I arrived 
at the corner, the Crocker limousine 
drove up to the City of Paris and 
Mrs. Crocker alighted. Before going 
into the store she went up to the 
old man and held a few moments' 
conversation with him, then passed 
on. When I went to buy some of 
his goods, his face was beaming as 
he said to me, with a wonderful 
light in his eye: 

"Do you know who that is? 
That's Mrs. William Crocker. She 
always buys lavendar from me for 
her linen closets, and she never 
passes me by without wishing me 
a good day. For a long time I did 
not know who she was. I tell you 
it is little happenings like that 
which make life worth living." 

It All Depends 

Lord Dunsany, in "The Mountain 
of the Gods," says that we are all 
beggars in the sight of the gods. 
Surely there are times when the in- 
stability of our standards enacts a 
farce which provokes the mirth of 
the gods and renders us litle less 
than fools in their sight. 

An example: Not long ago, one 
of the country's big young men, one 
who deserves in every way to be 
considered so, came to live here. He 
has amassed a large fortune, and 
while he is self-made, he is far from 
the crude product which many of 
our western results of home indus- 
try prove themselves to be. He is 
most charming and delightful. 

When he first came to town I 
heard several of the young girls dis- 
cussing him. One of the girls whose 
family has not quite "arrived" as 
yet, was very emphatic in her dec- 
larations that he was not at all 
their kind and she did not deem it 
advisable to admit him within the 
holy of holies of their sacred circle. 



Presto! change! He had been 
here but a short time when he was 
welcomed into the most exclusive 
set. My little lady, who had so 
much to say, evidently changed her 
mind. I heard her talking to some 
friend at the Town and Country 
Club the other day, and she was 
most enthusiastic about his "hon- 
est, open eyes" and his straight- 
forward manner and his interesting 
conversation. "He's a charming 
man of the world, and so well-man- 
nered," she exclaimed. "And you 
know," she continued, "he goes to 
Marion Newhall's and to the Jol- 
liffe's and to the Sharons," and she 
named a half dozen people of as- 
sured position, "so I shall ask him 
to my dance." 

Back from Europe 
One of the most attractive of the 
young matrons at the Fairmont 
dansant last Friday was Mrs. John 
C. Black, who has just returned 
home from Paris where she has 
been for six months. Ever since 
the war broke out she and Mrs. 
Thurman Alden de Bolt (Elizabeth 
Rowan l have occupied an apart- 
ment in the French capital and 
have spent two hours each day in 
helping as assistant nurses at the 
American Red Cross Hospital. She 
has many interesting stories to tell 
of the war and its attendant situa- 
tions. 

Incidentally, Mrs. Black, who is 
always most attractively gowned, is 
wearing some stunning Parisian 
clothes. The other day she had on 
a chic tan broadcloth, a Paquin 
model. It was made with a box- 
plaited skirt and one of the very 
long waist effects, with the sleeves 
and neckpiece set in as a sort of 
guimpe. A wide band of sealskin 
joined the waist and the skirt. The 
high standind collar was of seal, 
and her jaunty little three-cornered 
toque was also of fur. 

At the St. Francis hotel on New 
Year's eve she wore an exquisite 
gown of cloth of silver and silver 
lace. She looked exactly like a little 
silver buttefly. 



^Illllllllllllllllllllllll llllllllllllllllllllllUlllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllll.-. 



Gibb s Special 
If one can judge by appearances, 
the official liquor of the Hetch 
Hetchy Camp is Gibb's Special. The 
preliminary survey party that went 
out recently took with them some- 
thing like seventy cases of this Cali- 
fornia product. It is remarkable 
how quickly Gibb's Special won its 
high place in the regard of San 
Franciscans. It has beaten out all 
the regular sellers. 

* * * * 

A wedding ceremony had come to 
a close. The mother sniffed con- 
vulsively, and the bride dabbed her 
pretty eyes with a handkerchief, 
of the bridesmaids was also affect- 
ed to tears. 

"Why do you weep?" asked the 
groomsman of the bridesmaid. "It's 
not your wedding." 

The girl looked at him scornfully. 

"That's the reason, you stupid." 

And then she sighed. 




= The Mark of the Candy of Character := 



"Small Blacks 

M A COFFEE CONFECTION 



19g 

i 



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More Than Twice As Good = 

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HOTEL AND RESTAURANT 
54 - 56 Ellis Street 



Our Cooking Will Meet Tour Taste. Our 
Prices Will Please Yon. 



The New 

POODLE DOG 




HOTEL & RESTAURANT 

WILL REMAIN AT CORNER 

POLK and POST 

SAN FRANCISCO 
Telephones: Franklin 2960; Home C 6706 



Pearl Oyster House 

Phone Douslas 4788 

FISH AND SHELLFISH 

In All lta Varieties 

Pine-St. Entrance, California Market 



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A Suey and Oriental Dishes in the .*. 

**♦ Finest Home like Dining Room in A 



Dining- Boom in 

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y First Class Service, Special Booms V 

> for Ladies y 

$ 532 GRANT AVENUE | 

*£ Between California and Pine Sts. X 



Saturday, January 16, 1915. 

THORNWELL MULLALLY S SUC 
CESS 

Thoi'nwcl] Muliaily's ability to or- 
ganize and direct affairs involving 
tin' handling of great crowds 
was proven by his work dur- 
ing the Portola carnivals and 

by his management of the Ball 

of all Nations last .May in Machin- 
ery Hall. Therefore, when it was 
decided to Officially open the Audi- 
torium on January 9th, he was 
promptly selected by President 
Moore to arrange a hall with which 
to celebrate the event, the proceeds 
of which would he used for fur- 
nishing the building. 

It was a stupendous task that 
confronted .Mr. Mullally. With the 
date of the opening only a month 
ahead. he had much more 
to do than merely conceive 
ami execute the details of the ball 
Itsell. Tile interior of the Audito. 
riiitn was far from completed, and 
Some of the streets adjacent to the 
Structure were impassable. Upon 
him. therefore, devolved the duty 
of seeing to it that the building 
and all the highways of approach 
to it were in perfect condition for 
pedestrian and vehicular use before 
January 9th, but also the planning 
and direction of every detail of pre- 
paring for what he had determined 
to make the greatest social func- 
tion in San Francisco's history. 

Within the Auditorium the seat- 
ing, lighting and heating arrange- 
ments had to be rushed, the dance 
floor smoothed and polished, the 
checking facilities prepared, the re- 
freshment rooms got ready — in brief, 
almost the entire internal equip- 
ment installed. Ushers, ticket-sell- 
ers, doorkeepers and other attaches 
had to be engaged and trained, in- 
terior decorations attended to wire- 
less telegraphy and telephonic com- 
munication established. 

In addition he had to expedite the 
in order to handle traffic. The 



THE WASP 



15 



ticket-selling campaign must be 

organized and conducted, and 

the interest of all elements of 
the communtiy enlisted by means 
of publicity, in spite ol this handi- 
cap, twenty-three thousand dollars 



weii' realized, all of which will he 
Used in furnishing and decorating 
the Auditorium. All these things, 
and many others aiming to pro. 
mote the ball's success, were direct- 
ed by a single head. 




(Continued from page 3) 

put it over. The usual harping of Samaritanism goes along with it. 
The document of coercion carries condiments. Local bureaus of in- 
formation will be established, and the hotels paying in will be put 
on Exposition literature. 

But the Exposition omits to state that because the hotels have taken 
care of them, and because it is the duty of all world expositions in 
respect to its daily flood of guests, that these information bureaus 
should be established anyway without charge. And during the per- 
iod of the Exposition three information bureaus, which are more than 
sufficient, can be operated in total for at least !);25,000. That leaves 
$275,000 of clear but not clean profit for the Exposition Company col- 
lecting on three hundred thousand rooms, and with their plan, which 
reads like a manifesto, they may be able to command a full compli- 
ance. 

As for the advertising which the Exposition will give the hotels, it 
will cost practically nothing for it will be thrown in with other mat- 
ter. One must doubt the value of such advertising anyway. The pub- 
licity department of the Exposition has been badly handled and in- 
efficiently operated ever since it was opened. Every editor in San 
Francisco has been aware of this but afraid to state it. 

On the whole the Exposition Company are better collectors from 
than advertisers for the city. But it is to be hoped that the hotels 
and aparment houses of San Francisco will have the courage to com- 
bine against this dollar-per-room outrage. 



I Have Serv- 
ed Four Gen- 
erations 
WHY NOT 
YOU? 
T. LUNDY, JEWELER 




Estcl. 1871. 



WONG SUN YUE TEA GARDEN 

535 Grant Avenue 

One of the biggest atractions of 
Chinatown. Only two blocks from 
White House, at entrance to Chinatown. 
Admission (including tea service) 25c 

Served in the original Chinese way. 
Of easy access for tourists arid visitors. 



Eames Tricycle Co. 




Manufacturers of INVA 
LID ROLLING CHAIRS 
for all purposes. Sol-' 
PropellingTricycle Chair* 
for the disabled. INVA 
LID CHAIES, Whole 
sale and retail and for 
rent. 1714 Market St.. 
&bd Francisco. Phone 
Park 2940. 1200 S. 
Main St., Los Angeles. 



'When You Say " 



"Good Bye" 



remember ihe quality of 
your Baggage means as 
Much to You as do the 
smart clothes you wear. 

Since 1667 we have 
been making right here 
in San Francisco smart 
Baggage for our Smart 
People. 

Our Fibre -Covered 
Wardrobe Trunks are 
meeting the approval 
of the most particular 
traveling public. 

SMART BAGGAGE FOR 
FORTY-SEVEN YEARS. 





m 3. W. Elson M. Amber 

v§ Telephone Kearny 5756 

I 

I Amber X Elson 

o Tjailors and importers 

gl 33 NEW MONTGOMERY ST. 

,.t? (Opposite Palace Hotel Entrance.) 

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BLAKE'S 



PHOTO STUDIO 

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101 GEARY STREET 



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Telephone Franklin 1098. 

Sixty Neal Institutes in the United States 

and Canada. 



16 



THE WASP 




ALMA GLUCK'S CONCERTS 

The career of Alma Gluck the 
youngest prima donne who has ev- 
er starred at the Metropolitan Op- 
era House reads like a fairy tale. 

This young product of New York 
jumped into fame in a single night 
at the Metropolitan Opera House 
just Ave years ago. Gatti-Gasaza 
needed a very young singer to un- 
dertake the role of Sophie in Masses- 
et's "Werther." A score of aspir- 
ants appeared and Alma Gluck was 
chosen. Since then she has climb- 
ed the ladder until she has reached 
the very top of her profession. 

For the past two years Mme. 
Gluck has devoted her energies and 
gifts to the concert stage — a career 
more difficult than that of opera. 
To hold an audience for two hours 
with no assistance but a piano re- 
quires genius and an Alma Gluck 
audience finds her concerts all too 
short. 

Manager Greenbaum will present 
the singer in two glorious programs 
at the Columbia Theatre on Sunday 
afternoons January 31 and Febru- 
ary 7. 

At the first concert the singer will 
give groups of old classics, in Ger- 
man, French and Italian, works by 
the masters of the romantic school 
such as Schubert, Schumann and 
Brahms, a group of works by the 
Slavic composers Rachmaninoff, 
Smeltana and Rimsky-Korsakow 
and some charming works in Eng- 
lish. 

Two of the most charming pro- 
grams ever offered our music lovers 
are promised. 

Mail orders for both concerts may 
now be addressed to "Will L. Green- 
baum at Sherman Clay and com- 
pany in San Francisco and tickets 
will be ready at the usual box of- 
fices as well as at the Columbia on 
Wednesday, January 27. 

The Pctaluma Musical Club will 
hear Mme. Gluck at the Hill Opera 
House on Tuesday night, February 
2, and she will sing for the Berke- 
ley Musical Association at the Uni- 
versity of California on Thursday 
night, February 4. 



THE GREAT M'CORMACK FARE- 
WELL AT THE CORT 
This Coming Sunday Afternoon 



So many hundreds of requests 
have been received for certain num- 
bers at the John McCormack fare- 
well concert at the Cort Theatre 
this Sunday Afternoon January 17 
at 2:30 that it has been quite a 



task to arrange the program to be 
given. Manager Greenbaum prom- 
ises that many of the works re- 
quested will be sung as encore num- 
bers. 

Here is a printed list of works to 
be given on this auspicious occas- 
ion. "Secrecy" Hugo Wolf, "Ave Ma- 
ria" Schubert, "The Three Com- 
rades" Hans Herman, Aria "Ah ! 
Moon of My Delight" from "In a 
Persian Garden" Liza Lehman, "Be- 
fore the Dawn" Hubert Bath, "Life 
and Death" S. Coleridge Taylor "The 
Bard of Armagh" "Ballynure Bal- 
lad" and "Reynardine" from Her- 
bert Hughes' collection of old Irish 
Folk Songs and "The Foggy Dew" 
arranged by Milligan Fox, the clos- 
ing number being the recitative 
and aria "Salute d'amour" from 
Gounod's "Faust." 

Seats for the concert are on sale 
at Sherman Clay and Co's, Kohler 
and Chase's and the Cort Theatre. 

Voices like John McCormack's are 
heard but rarely in a life-time and 
no lover of beautiful song can af- 
ford to miss this last opportunity 
of hearing this beloved artist. 



THE SAN FRANCISCO QUINTET 
CLUB 

There has been a slight change 
made in the program for the final 
concert of the season by the San- 
Francisco Quintet Club at the St. 
Francis Hotel next Sunday after- 
noon January 24. It has been de- 
cided to devote the program 
to works never before heard 
here and in place of the Quartet 
by Brahms originally announced 
the concert will open with the 
"Quartet" Op. 23 /for piano and 
strings by Antonin Dvorak, which 
for some reason seems to have been 
overlooked by our ensemble organ- 
izations. This will be followed by 
the "Serenade" for flute, violin and 
viola by Max Reger and the "Quin- 
tet" for piano and strings by Do- 
hnanyi. 

Tickets may be secured at Sher- 
man and Clay's and Kohler and 
Chase's. 

-X- # # * -X- 

ORPHEUM 

There will be six new acts and 
only two holdovers in the Orpheum 
bill next week. 

Alice Eis and Bert French will 
present an entirely new act styled 
"The Dance of the Temptress" which 
is said to completely eclipse all their 
previous terpsichorean efforts. The 
title is self-explanatory and the 
stage settings are the most original 
ever witnessed. One of them is a 
sea of soap bubbles on which var- 
ious colored lights are thrown with 
beautiful effect. 

Wellington Cross and Lois Jose- 




Saturday, January 16, 1915. 



Alcazar 



PHONE KEARNY 2 
Matinees Thursday and Saturdays 

Alessandro Bevani 
Opera Company 

Sat Matinee, "Carmen"; night, "Ballo 
in Maschera" ; Sunday night "Rigo- 
letto." 

Week of January 18th — Mon., Sat. 
nights, Thursday Matinee, "Aida." 
Tuesday, and Sunday Nights, "Barber 
of Seville." Wednesday, Friday Nights 
"Carmen." Saturday Matinee, "II 
Trovatore." Thursday Night, "Ballo 
in Maschera." 

PRICES NIGHTS — 50c, $1., $1-50, $2.00 
MATINEES — 50c and $1-00 



CQE£ 



LEADING 

THEATRE 

Ellli &nd Market 



Phone Sutter 2460 



Last Time Sat. — Belgian War Pictures 



Starting Sunday Night, January 17 

Matinees Wednesday and Saturday 

The Vivid, Vital Play of New York 

Life 



yy 



"TODAY 



By George Broadhurst and Abraham 

Schomer With "The Perfect Cast" 

Headed by 

ARTHUR BYRON 

Nights and Saturday Matinee Prices, 50c 

to $1.50. Best seats $1.00 at Wednesday 

matinee. 

Safest and Most Magnificent Theatre in 
America. 






Week Beginning this Sunday afternoon 

(Matinee 1'Jvery Day.) 



A RECORD BREAKING SHOW 

ALICE EIS & BERT FRENCH in 
■The Dance of the Temptress"; WEL- 
LINGTON CROSS & LOIS JOSEPHINE, 
Vaudeville Favorites; ANNA CHAND- 
LER in "All Original Ideas;" MR. & 
MRS. JIMMY BARRY presenting; "The 
Rube;" ALFRED WALLENSTEIN. The 
Wonderful Boy Cellist and GRACE 
ADELE FREEBEY, Composer and Pian- 
ist; AERIAL COSTAS; LEO ZARRELL 
& CO., Entertainers of Merit; McKAY 
& ARDINE. Last week JOSEPH SANT- 
LEY r , assisted by Ruth Randall and Jo- 
sephine Kernell in "A Touch of Musi- 
cal Comedy." 

Evening* Prices 10c, 25c, 50c, 75c. 

Matinee Prices (except Sundays and 

Holidays) 10c, 25c, 50c. 

PHONE DOUGLAS 70 



A aa Gluck, who sings at Columbia Theater, Jan. 31st and Feb. 7th 



►ILTMOl 



;\l 



NEW YORK \ 

America's Latest and 1 

J Most Refined and New 1 

j York's Centermost Hotel 

j Only hotel occupying an entire city 

block, Vanderbilt and Madison / 
, 43d and 44th Sts., adjoining Gi 
Central Terminal 

, 1000 rooms: 930 with bath—Room r 
from $2.!i0 per day. Suites fror 
to 15 rooms for permanent or 
pancy. Large and small ball, bfl 
\ quet and dinjng salons and suit- 
i specially arranged fc 
"■ private functions 
v Gustav Baumann, 
.John McE. Down 
*'"ce-Prcs 




Saturday, January Hi, 1915. 

phinc the New ^"<irk musical com- 
edy stars, have just returned from 
London where they hud a most suc- 
cessful run at the Empire Theatre. 
The act of this clever couple is one 
of the biggest hits in vaudeville, 

Anna Chandler, one of the most 
successful exponents of syncopated 
melodies will introduce a splendid 
repertoire of songs which arc sung 
exclusively by her. 

Mr. and .Mrs. Jimmy Harry will 
present their greatest hit the com- 
edy skit "The Rube". 

Alfred Wallenstein, the California 
Boj Cellist, will perform a most de- 
lightful scries of solos. His accom- 
panist will be Grace Adele Preebey, 
a composer of charming music. 

The Aerial Costas, a quartette of 
athletes consisting of three women 
and one man will present a strat- 
linE and picturesque performance. 

The Leo Zarrel) Company consist- 
ing of two men and a boy are dash- 
ing and daring gymnasts who pro- 
sent a number of novel and daring 
gymnastic stunts. 

The remaining acts will be McKay 
and Ardine and Joseph Santlcy as- 
sisted by Ruth Randall and Jose- 
phine Kernel] in their great hit 
"A Touch ot Musical Comedy." 
* . * #* # 

CORT 

George Broadhnrst and Abraham 
Schomer's much-discussed drama of 
a certain phase of modern society, 
entitled "To-day," comes to the C°rt 
Theatre next Sunday night, Janu- 
ary 17th, for an engagement with 
a popular-priced matinee on Wed- 
nesday and a regular matinee on 
Saturday. 

"To-day" enjoyed a longer run in 
New York last season than any oth- 
er dramatic offering, and it has met 
with great success in all the large 
cities of the East and Middle West. 
The company which will "be seen 
here appeared in Chicago for four 
months. 

Briefly put, the story of "To-day" 
may be said to be that of a woman 
who capitalizes her pretty face and 
figure. She is a thoughtless butter- 
fly, whose devoted husband has 
failed in business and is slowly re- 
gaining his lost ground; but she 
cannot wait until he rehabilitates 
himself. She craves the fine raiment 
and the creature comforts of their 
prosperous days. She resorts to dif- 
ferent expedients in order to get 
them. She even purchases gowns 
and hats she knows she cannot pay 
for. 

Then enters temptation, not in 
the form of a man concealing cloven 
feet in patent leather pumps, but 
an exquisitely gowned woman, who 
tells the miserable wife that there 
are luxurious apartments, owned 
by extremely discreet w°men, where 
highly respectable men of wealth 
meet young wives like herself whose 
husbands do not earn enough to 
satisfy their extravagant tastes. 

The rest of the story is said to 
be handled with such consummate 
skill by the playwrights as to ren- 
der it a living, breathing represen- 
tation of life as it is being lived 
to-day in the great metropolis 



THE WASP 



17 



m - a larger class than one 

ever dreamt of. I n fact, a hen "To- 
day" was first presented in New 
.York, it startled even the blase 
"first-nighters" by the vividness of 
its portrayal of conditions that no 
one had dared to hint at before as 
existing. 

Arthur Byron will be seen in the 
role of the duped husband, and 

Bertha Mann will portray th 

ring wife. Others in the cast which 
Manager Harry von Tilzer is send- 
ing here are Clara Lindsay, Marguer- 
ite st. John, Alice Gale, Herman 
Gerold, Kathryn Keys and Harry 
MaoFayden. 



graceful couple will give exhibitions 
ol ballroom dancing every after 

Qoon between Inn r and five and ev- 
ery evening after eight. There will 
be exhibition dancing, only, ill the 

afternoons, but each evening, in ad- 
dition to exhibition dancing. Mr. 
Carville will be pleased to dance 
Willi any lady and Miss La Man 
with any gentleman present and 
will (each, without charge, the steps 
of the latest ballroom dances. 



The enveing of Jan. 20th will be 
a gala occasion at Teehau Tavern, 
when a dinner dance wiU be given, 
with dancing on the new maple 
floor in the center of the main cafe. 
The dancing will commence at eight 
o'clock and there will be fun-mak- 
ing souvenirs for everybody. The 
management has engaged Mr. Rob- 
ert Carville and Miss La Marr, late 
dancing stars of the musical com- 
edy success. "The Tango Tea," who 
will make their first appearance at 
the Tavern on this occasion. This 



They Could Not Agree 

When the sculptor Rodin, notor- 
ious lor the number of his amours, 
first met .Mrs. Potter Palmer he was 
much charmed by her beauty and 
wished to make a marble bust of 
her. Mrs. Palmer, flattered, gave 
frequent sittings at the sculptor's 
studio. Unhappily, she was not 
content to let Rodin work after his 
own fashion, but insisted on im- 
proving not only on Rodin's but 
nature's art, in fact she would dic- 
tate to him as she would to her 
dressmaker! The upshot was that 
the bust lies in the sculptor's Paris 
studio— never to be finished. 





John 
McCormack 



This Sunday Afternoon, January 17 
at 2:30 

CORT THEATER 

Tickets ^.oo, $1.50, ji.oo, at Sherman, 
Clay Co.'s and Curt Theater. Box Seats 
*2.50. 

STEIHWAT PIANO 



S. F. QUINTET CLUB 

Last Concert 
Sunday Afternoon, January 24 

at St. Francis 

Tickets 50c and $1.00 at Music Stores 



Mail orders now for 
ALMA GLUCK 

Soprano 

Columbia Theater 

2 Sunday afternoons 
January 31 — February 7 

Prices: Orchestra $2.50 and $2.00. Bal- 
cony $2.00, $1.50, $1.00. Second Balcony 
$1.00. Box Seats $2.50. 

Send Checks to WILL L. GREENBAUM 

at SHERMAN CLAY & CO.'S, Sutter and 

Kearny, San Francisco 



Coming*: 
ZIMBALIST — The VioUn Virtuoso 



Office Houn 

9 a. m. io 5:20 p. m. 
Phone DoWu 1501 



Residence 
573 Fifth Avenue 
Houn 6 to 7:30 p. a 
Phone P*ci&c 275 



W. H. PYBURN 
NOTARY PUBLIC 

My Motto "ALWAYS IN" 

On pule Francau Se habla Eapuo 

Office: 229 Montgomery Street 
San FrancUco California 



Glasses absolutely necessary. 
Demand rapidly increasing*. 

The demand for proper glasses is in- 
creasing* every year for two reasons: 
First, — more work is demanded of the 
eyes than formerly — Second, people now 
realize that they are better fitted for 
their duties if they have good eyesight. 
This is particularly true of people who 
require two pairs of glasses — one for 
reading and one for distance. "With the 
recent invention of the wonderful "One- 
piece" Bifocal, two pairs of glases are 
not required as reading and distance cor- 
rections are ground in one glass — yet 
there is no noticeable dividing line be- 
tween the two portions. 

W. D. Fennimore \ i | / / A. R. Fennimore 
' \J. W.Dayis' / / . 




t\ 



San Francisco 



Alice Eis and Bert French in "The Dance of the Temptress" 
Next week at the Orpheum 



181 Post Street 
2508 Mission St 

1221 Broadway, Oakland 

Hermosillo International Co. 

WHY 



id 



THE WASP 



Saturday, January 1G, 1915. 




PERHAPS YOU KNOW THEM 

(Continued from page 7) 
lady moved and held herself as 
though she adorned the scene, and 
with every succeeding high-ball or 
freppe, served decoy, the man be- 
came redder in the face and pulled 
oftener at the amber-brown mus- 
tache that flanked his upper lip. 

Shortly after 12 they found theu- 
selves entering a certain cafe on the 
Coast that has a reputation for 
"class." The lady had seated her- 
self and her companion was about 
to do the same, when instanly he 
started strangely and stood gaping 
over at a table against the wall 
where another couple sat regarding 
them. 

It was the blonde woman from 
San Mateo and her partner. She had 
seen them enter and gripped the 
arm of her vis-a-vis in sudden fright. 

"My husband!" she pronounced. 
And then they endeavored to con- 
trol themselves. The girl with Pax 
had likewise heard him gasp: "My 
wife!" But in her tipsy state she 
was not to be outdone by such in- 
telligence. She glanced over non- 
chalantly and smiling as one deter- 
mined to give as good as she got. 
Then she suggested: "Why not in- 
vite them over and have a drink?" 

With a powerful effort Prank Pax 
rose to the occasion and summoned 
the two to his table. Introductions 
were made by himself and his wife, 
each giving wrong names. Then, 
while the waiter went for a round 
of drinks, the four sat staring into 
each other's eyes— the two men and 
the two women. None of them were 
mistaken with regard to one an- 
other. 



visitors this year who have never 
been in the state previously — they 
have been led to expect very much, 
and I do not believe you will disap- 
point them. 

Yours Respectfully, 
An American 



25 Broad Street, 

New York, Jan. 7„ 1915 
Editor "The Wasp," 

San Francisco, Cal. 

Dear Sir: I read with pleasure 
an article in your paper of 26th ult. 
by Mrs. A. B. Spreckels, in which 
it is plainly shown how much in- 
terest she takes in the success of 
the Panama Exposition. 

This is all very well, but if the 
Exposition is intended to benefit 
the State and the City it is but just 
that the State and City should go 
down into their pockets and 
launch out money liberally. Those 
who had doubts as to the success 
of the enterprise have changed 
their minds, and if it proves to 
be the finest Exposition the world 
ever saw I beileve it will be general- 
ly admitted. San Francisco will then 
take a position of being the West- 
ern metropolis of the United States. 
Now that we have the Panama Ca- 
nal the time is ripe to take advan- 
tage of it. 

The foreign states engaged in war 
have shown an interest in this 
movement to a much greater degree 
than was anticipated. 

California will have millions of 



(Continued from Page 9) 
chase, much to the delight of his 
firends. He was fa sorry-looking 
spectacle when he returned, but in 
true sportsman-like spirit he took 
the puns of his friends for the bal- 
ance of the day and returned home 
happy in spite of his adventures. 

Want Light on the Subject? 

Woe has cast a heavy shadow 
across the piercing gleam of The 
X-ray. Its luminating power (that 
is to say, its editor) has suffered 
from the penetrating rays. 

In other words, Harry Hargrave, 
editor of The X-ray, the latest week- 
ly to enter the San Francisco jour- 
nalistic field, wears a much-batter- 
ed face this week as a result of an 
encounter with a diminutive strang- 
er just after his initial issue had 
appeared upon the streets. 

Word of the mysterious attack 
upon the editor spread about town 
as suddenly as The X-ray itself ap- 
peared, and now San Francisco, 
with curiosity aroused, is waiting 
for the light of The X-ray to reveal 
something about the unexplained 
assault. 

Versions of the affair differ. Only 
one fact seems certain. That is that 
Hargrave was pummeled at Mason 
and Market streets one afternoon 
last week by a diminutive and de- 
formed stranger who attacked him 
without explanation. 

Some say that "four strong-arm 
men" were stationed nearby to "sail 
in" when the opportune time ar- 
rived. But, if they were there, their 
services were not needed, for the 
small pugilist finished the work 
himself. 

Others declare that the editor, at 
the time of the assault, was on his 
way to meet a well-known poolroom 
owner. The Xray Jis needed to 
throw some light on the subject. 

| The Beauty Shop 

ZENOBIA SISTERS 

212 Stockton Street 

Hair Dressing and Manicuring 

Toilet Preparations 

Electrolysis 

Exclusive Beauty Shop and 
Specialists 

Telephone Garfield 8130 ^ 

I I 

**• FOB SALE A 

Y Y 

♦|> A Wholesale and Retail Wine ♦£ 

Y and Liquor House, located in Y 
A downtown San Francisco. A very ♦*♦ 

Y old established business. The V 
*J # owner desires to go to Europe. *J* 
X For further particulars applv to *J» 
X room 347, at 49 Geary St. Tele- a 
A phone Doug-las 1871. ♦*♦ 



Gray hair restored to its natural col- 
or by Alfredum's Egyptian Henna — a 
perfectly harmless dye, and the effect 
is immediate. Tnj most certain and 
satisfactory preparation for the pur- 
pose. Try it. At all druggists. — Adyt 

MONEY LOANED on Diamonds 
and Jewelry. 2 per cent per month. 
Columbia Loan Office, 3 Stockton 
street. Est. 1872 



Wedding Rinses 

Watchmakers, Jewelers, Opticians. 
715 Market St., Nr. Third. 



»»»»0»» Q »»»»W» » »0»fr»»»»»» 



ASSOCIATED SAVINGS BANKS 
OF SAN FRANCISCO 

DIVIDEND NOTICES 



HUMBOLDT SAVINGS BANE, 783 
Market Street, near Fourth. — For the 
half year ending December 31, 1914, a 
dividend has been declared at the rate 
of four (4) per cent per annum on all 
savings deposits, payable on and after 
Saturday, January 2, 1915. Dividends 
not called for are added to and bear the 
same rate of interest as the principal 
from January 1, 1915. 

H. C. KLEVESAHL, Cashier. 



THE GERMAN SAVINGS AND LOAN 
society;, 526 California Street, San 
Francisco; Mission Branch, corner Mis- 
sion and 21st Sts.; Richmond District 
Branch, corner Clement St. and 7th Ave.; 
Haight Street Branch, corner Haight 
and Belvedere Sts. — For the half year 
ending December 31, 1914, a dividend has 
been declared at the rate of four (4) per 
cent per annum on all deposits, payable 
on and after Saturday, January 2, 1915. 
Dividends not called for are added to 
the deposit account and earn dividends 
from January 1, 1915. 

GEORGE TOURNT, Manager. 



MUTUAL SAVINGS BANE OF SAN 
FRANCISCO, 706 Market Street, oppo- 
site Third. — For the half year ending 
December 31, 1914, a dividend has been 
declared at the rate of four (4) per cent 
per annum on all savings deposits, pay- 
able on and after Saturday, January 
2, 1915. Deposits not called for are 
added to and bear the same rate of in- 
terest as the principal from January 1, 
3915. 
JAMES D. PHELAN, President. 

C. B. HOBSON, Cashier. 



FBENCH-AMEBICAN BANE OF SAV- 
INGS (Saving-s Department) — For the 
half year ending December 31, 1914, a 
dividend has been declared at the rate 
of four (4) per cent per annum on all 
deposits, payable on and after Saturday, 
January 2, 1915, Dividends not called 
for are added to and bear the same rate 
of interest as the principal from Janu- 
ary 1, 1915. 

A. LEGALLET, President. 
Office — 108 Sutter Street. 



BANE OF ITALY, Southeast corner 
Montgomery and Clay Streets ; Market 
Street Branch., junction Market, Turk 
and Mason Streets — For the half year 
ending December 31, 1914, a dividend 
has been declared at the rate of four 
(4) per cent per annum on all savings 
deposits, payable on and after Saturday, 
January 2, 1915. Dividends not called 
for are added to and bear the same rate 
of interest as the principal from Janu- 
ary 1, 1915. Money deposited on or be- 
fore January 11, 1915, will earn interest 
from January 1, 1915. 
L. SCATENA, President 

A. PEDRINA, Cashier 



SECURITY SAVINGS BANE, 316 

Montgomery Street. — For the half year 
ending December 31, 1914, a dividend 
upon all deposits at the rate of four (4) 
per cent per annum will be payable on 
and after January 2, 1915. 

S. L. ABBOT, Vice-President, 



THE BCIBBBNIA SAVINGS AND 
LOAN SOCIETY. Office — Corner Market, 
McAllister and Jones Streets. — For the 
half year ending December 31, 1914, a 
dividend has been declared at the rate 
of four (4) per cent per annum on all 
deposits, payable on and after Saturday. 
January 2, 1915. Dividends not drawn 
will be added to depositors' accounts, 
become a part thereof, and will earn 
dividend from January 1, 1915. Depos- 
its made on or before January 11, 1915, 
will draw interest from January 1, 1915. 
R. M. TOBIN, Secretary. 



LEGAL NOTICES. 



SUMMONS TO ESTABLISH TITLE 

IN THE SUPERIOR COURT of the 

State of California in and for the City 
and County of San Francisco. 
Action No. 35277. 
Gerald C. Halsey, Attorney for Plaintiff. 
HARLOW W. CULVER and ELLA P. 

CULVER, his wife, Plaintiffs, 
vs. 
All persons claiming any interest in, or 

lien upon, the real property herein 

described or any part thereof, De- 
fendants. 

THE PEOPLE OF THE STATE OF 
CALIFORNIA: 

To all persons claiming any interest 
in, or lien upon, the real property here- 
in described or any part thereof, defend- 
ants, greeting: 

You are hereby required to appear 
and answer the complaint of HARLOW 
W. CULVER and ELLA F. CULVER, 
his wife, plaintiffs, filed with the Clerk 
of the above entitled Court and City and 
County, within three months after the 
first publication of this Summons, and 
to set forth what interest or lien, if any, 
you have in or upon that certain real 
property or any part thereof, situated 
in the City and County of San Francis- 
co, State of California, particularly de- 
scribed as follows : 

COMMENCING at a point on the 
Northerly line of Hayes Street distant 
thereon Two Hundred and Thirty-four 
(234) feet 4-% inches Westerly from 
the Westerly line of Baker Street; run- 
ning thence westerly and along said 
Northerly line of Hayes street Twenty- 
five (25) feet; thence at a right angle 
Northerly One Hundred and Thirty-sev- 
en (137) feet 6 inches; thence at a right 
angle Easterly twenty-five feet (25) 
feet; thence at a right angle Southerly 
One Hundred and Thirty-seven (137) 
feet 6 inches to the Northerly line of 
Hayes street and the point of com- 
mencement. 

BEING part of Western Addition 
Block No. 594. 

And you are hereby notified that, un- 
less you so appear and answer, the 
plaintiffs will apply to the Court for the 
relief demanded in the complaint, to- 
wit; That it be adjudged that the plain- 
tiffs are the owners of said property in 
fee simple as absolute; that their title 
to said property be established and 
quieted; that the Court ascertain and 
determine all estates, rights, titles, in- 
terests and claims in and to said prop- 
erty, and every part thereof, whether 
the same be legal or equitable, present 
or future, vested or contingent, and 
whether the same consists of mortgages 
or liens of any description; that plain- 
tiffs recover their costs herein and have 
such other and further relief as may be 
meet in the premises. 

WITNESS my hand and the seal of 
said Court this 29th day of December, 
A. D., 1914. 

H. I. MULCREVY, Clerk. 
By S. I. Hughes, Deputy Clerk. 

The first publication of this summons 
was made in The Wasp newspaper on 
the 2nd day of January, A. D., 1915. 

The following persons are said to 
claim an interest in, or lien upon, said 
property adverse to plaintiff. 

Bank of Italy, a corporation, Mont- 
gomery and Clay Streets, San Francisco. 
California. 

Gerald C. Halsey, Attorney for Plain- 
tiffs, Rooms 501-502-503 California-Pa- 
cific Building, 105 Montgomery Street, 
San Francisco, Cal. 



SUMMONS 

IN THE SUPERIOR COURT of the 
State of California, in and for the 
City and County of San Francisco. 
EDNA M. HEIN, Plaintiff, vs. PEDRO 
GARCIA and BONITA GARCIA, his 
wife, defendant. Edward Lande, at- 
torney for plaintiff. 
No. 59413. Action brought in the Su- 
perior Court of the State of California 
in and for the City and County of San 
Francisco, and the complaint filed in the 
office of the County Clerk of said City 
and County. 

THE PEOPLE OF THE STATE OF 
CALIFORNIA SEND GREETINGS TO: 
Pedro Garcia and Bonita Garcia, his 
wife, defendants. 

YOU ARE HEREBY DIRECTED to 
appear and answer the complaint in an 
action entitled as above, brought against 
you in the Superior Court of the State 
of California, in and for the City and 
County of San Francisco, within ten 
days after the service on you of this 
alias summons — if served within this 
City and County; or within thirty days 
if served elsewhere. 

And you are hereby notified that un- 
less you appear and answer as above 
required, the said Plaintiff will take 
judgment for the money or damages de- 
manded in the complaint as arising upon 
contract or will apply to the Court for 
the relief demanded in the complaint. 

GIVEN under my hand and seal of 
the Superior Court at the City and Coun- 
ty of San Francisco, State of California, 
.this 5th day of December, A. D. 1914. 

K. I. MULCREVY, Clerk. 
(SEAL) By H. Brunner. 

Deputy Clerk. 



THE WASP 




BERTHA MANN, the Clever Leading Woman in "To-day" at the Cort 



Imported Champagnes are now giving way 

to the 

Italian Swiss Colony's 

Golden State 

Dry Champagne 

Produced at 
Asti, California 

At Cafes, Hotels, 
M Wine Dealers 




Extra 




LA GRANDE & WHITES 
LAUNDRY CO. 



Office and Works: 231 Twelfth St. 
Bet. Howard and Folsom Sta. 

SAN FRANCISCO. - . CALIFORNIA 
Telephone Market 916 



Send for Our Select List of 

EIGHTY CALIFORNIA PAPERS 

You con insert Display 

Ads in the entire list for 

EIGHT DOLLARS AN INCH 

Dake Advertising Agency, Inc. 



432 S. MAIN ST. 
Los Angeles 



121 SECOND ST. 
San Francisco 



Paul Elder's 

Unique Book and Art Shop 

Known the world over 
among 1 cultured people for 
Its harmonious beauty 
and efficient service. You 
will be cordially welcom- 
ed. 

Paul Elder and Company 

239 Grant Ave, San Francisco 



Healthful Delicious Refreshing 

Drink Kinsner 

CALIFORNIA VICHY 

"Unexclled as a Bar or Table Water" 

Kinsner Mineral Springs Company 

Owners and Controllers, Willits, Cal. 

TET A KINSNEE LEMONADE 

San Francisco Office : 

12th and FOLSOM STREETS 

Phone Market 3654 



PATRICK & CO. 

RUBBER STAMPS 

STENCILS 
SEALS 
BADGES 
SIGNS, ETC. 
560 Market St. San Francisco 



Valuable Information 

Of a Business, Personal or Social Nature 

from the Pres of the 

Pacific Coast 

ALLEN'S 

Press Clipping Bureau 

88 TIRST STREET 

SAN FRANCISCO, CALIFORNIA 
Telephone Kearny 392 



Sultan Turkish Baths 

624 POST STEEET 

Special Department for Ladies 

Open Day and Night for Ladies and 
Gentlemen. 

Al. JohnBon, formerly of Sutter Street 
Hamraam has lenBed the Sultan Turkish 
Baihs, where he will be glad to see his 
old and new customers. 



San Francisco's Restaurant de Luxe 

Adjoining the Columbia Theatre 

You do not know this city until you have dined at FRED SOLARI'S, 
San Francisco's most palatial restaurant. World famous for its dis- 
tinctive cuisine and polite service. 

DANSANTS EVERY EVENING 
EXCEPT SUNDAY 
in main dining room, under direction of competent lady manager. A 
place of beauty and refinement and the right people about you. 

FRED SOLARI'S GRILL 

CORNER MASON AND GEARY STREETS 



SING CHONG CO. 



BEAUTIFUL 

ORIENTAL 

BAZAAR 

Large Display 

of 

Presents 

at reasonable 

Prices. 

Satisfaction 

Guaranteed 

Packing and 

Delivery Free 




GRANT AVE. and 

CALIFORNIA STREET 

CHINATOWN 






iiiiiiiiiiiiniiiiiiiiiiiiin 

IIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIINIIIIIIIIII 



liiiuiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii 

fiiiiiiiiiiiiiniiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii 



THE 



Feather River Canyon -Royal Gorge 

ROUTE 



leans service 
Scemiery Satisfaction 



THE 



Distinctive San Francisco Route 



TICKET OFFICES: 
665 MARKET STREET 1326 BROADWAY, OAKLAND 

Phone Sutter 1651 Phone Oakland 132 

iiiiiiiiniii iiinmiiiiiiiiii m tm iHfwiii iiiiunin i 

iiiiii ■iiiiniiiiiimiiii %KK?f "nun I mi n 




Golden State limited 

VIA LOS ANGELES 

Chicago, St. Louis, 
Kansas City 

From San Francisco, Ferry Station 
6:00 P.M. DAILY 



Souatheira Pacific 

The Exposition Line — 1915 — First in Safety. 






NIGHT AND DAY SERVICE 

Franklin Engraving Co. 




DESIGNERS, ILLUSTRATORS 
THREE COLOR HALF TONE 
HALF TONE SZINC ETCHING 




11$ Columbus Avenue 
San Fpancisco, Cal. 

Our Art Department Creates Distinctive and Original Designs 
for Booklets, Newspaper Advertising and all Stationery 
of Highest Quality. 

The Photo-Engraving Department Produces Cuts in all the 
Modern Processes of Tri-color, Multi-color, Copper 
Halftones, Zinc Etchings and Embossing Dies 



Vol. LXXm— No. 4 



SATURDAY, JANUARY 23, 1914 



Price 10 cents 




~4 WEEKLY JOURNAL^ 
ILLUSTRATION -» COMMENT 



ESTABLISHED ^ 1»7<3 



I 




HOTEL DEL CORONADO, Coronado California. 

Where the Polo Season for 1915 Was Inaugurated January First and 
Closes in March with the Tenth Annual Polo Tournament 



■-.,.-■'. .- ■ ■■ ■ ■ ■ ' ■ 



THE WASP 



LEAOIN' 




AND RESORTS 



Have You dined in the 

Palace Hotel 
Court? 

Service and Cuisine Perfect 



Fairmont Under Same Management 



Palace Hotel Company 



HOTEL OAKLAND 



30 Minutes from San Francisco 
DIRECT FERRY TO EXPOSITION GROUNDS 
Cuisine and Service Unsurpassed. 

Under Management of Victor Reiter. 



Rates Reasonable. 



Special Notice 



I 



During January we will give free a pretty wine tray with % 
cash purchases of $2.00 and over. *| 

Kentucky Mercantile Co. I 



S Phone Sutter 4031 



488 SUTTER ST. § 



HOTEL SOMERTON 

Now Open 
440 GEARY STREET 

Opposite Columbia Theatre 

Connected with Cecil Hotel 
and Under Same Management 
Newly Furnished — 

Strictly First-Class 

MRS. W. F. MORKIS, Proprietor 



The Electric Way from 

San Francisco and Oakland 

To and Through 

The Sacramento Valley 

Look "Dp the Rate on all Your Freight 

Train Schedules Designed for Busy 

Travelers 

OAKLAND, ANTIOCH 
& EASTERN RAILWAY 



FAIRMONT HOTEL 

Recognized as the most complete and beautiful residence hotel in the 
world. 500 rooms, every one with attached bath. 

The Rendezvous of the discriminating travelers from every land 
Largest floor space devoted to public use of any hotel in the world. 
EUROPEAN PLAN 

PALACE HOTEL COMPANY 

SAN FRANCISCO 

1 Person $3.00 to $5.00 

2 Persons $5.00 to $8.00 



Hotel St. Francis 



Turkish Baths 

Twelfth Floor for Men 
Eleventh Floor for Women 



JAMES WOODS, Manager 



JULES RESTAURANT 




DANCING 

Every Thursday and Saturday Evenings 



Dinner with Wine $1.00 

675 MARKET STREET 



Dancing at 7 p. m. 
OPP. CHRONICLE 



Established 1853 
Monthly Contracts $1.50 per Month 
•'., -...: ."- NEW WORKS JUST ERECTED AT 

M / v3jG ' Z^^^^^ 27 TENTH STREET, S. F. 

M J ~\^*r32Z0^^^^ Largest and Most Up-to-Date on Pacific 

^fc^ - ^aaa^3 a *'^^ Coast. Wagons call twice daily. Cleaning 

Dainty Garments Our Specialty. 

F. THOMAS PARISIAN DYEING & CLEANING WORKS 




Through Redwood. Canyon 
Over Bock Ballasted Road Bed 
Automatic Block Sig-nals 
Comfortable Steel Coaches 
Observation Cars 

Ticket Offices 

Fortieth & Shafter Ave. 

In Oakland 

Piedmont 870 

Key Route Ferry Third & I Sts. 

In San Francisco In Sacramento 

Sutter 2339 Main 261 



f SING CHONG CO. I 

? 

v 
•{ 
v 
X 




LEADING CHINESE 
BAZAAR 

Importers, Wholesale 
and Retail Dealers in 



ORIENTAL ART 
GOODS 

Kimonos, Silk Under- 
Wear, Jade, Jewelry, Iv- 
ory Furniture, etc. 

601-611 GRANT AVE. 

Cor. California, 

Opp. St. Mary's Church 

Chinatown 



;~x~:~>.j.:»X":»M~K~H~t«:»K~:~J'^J~X"X"M"> 



San Francisco's Fashionable Society, Playjtnd Frolic, in The WASP 



The Pacific Coast Weekly 



-^L^shI^^S^ WEEKLIES VERSUS THE DAILIES 



SECOND COURAGE 

A medical officer who has been 
making a study of the "psychology 
of courage" at the British front says 
that most men confess to a feeling 
of fear which only wears off after 
several days in the trenches. "But 
once this physical instinct of ter- 
ror is conquered, there comes," says 
the medical man, "a second courage, 
which, while not despising danger, 
is able to discount it. Under fire 
these men find a self hitherto un- 
suspected, an elusive quality which 
for want of a better title is called 
manhood. 

"The soldier learns first to con- 
trol, then to measure, his fear. He 
learns to discount possibilities just 
as the ordinary railroad traveler 
does. And the work in hand gen- 
erally engages and holds more and 
more of his attention. Then comes 
a time when he wants to go back 
to the firing line, not because it is 
pleasant there, but because staying 
away is just impossible. 

"While the man who has not yet 
been under fire cannot safely count 
upon experiencing this or that par- 
ticular feeling when 'his hour comes 
— this depending upon tempera- 
ment and circumstances — he can, I 
believe, count upon soon achieving 
the second courage which is the 
priceless possession of the veteran. 
Under fire he may lose every precon- 
ceived notion he ever cherished or 
shunned, but it is highly probable 
that he will find himself." 



The man from Montana was eat- 
ing lobster Newburg the other 
night in a Broadway restaurant. 

"Lobsters are common enough to 
you folks here on the sea coast," he 
remarked to a New Yorker," but 
when one gets well inland the fresh 
lobster becomes a bit more of a 
novelty. Not that we don't get 
plenty of lobsters in Montana, but, 
naturally, there they're not as num- 
erous as down here, and they are re- 
garded as more of a luxury. 

"This fact was brought to my at- 
tention one night recently in a ho- 
tel in Butte. I got in on a rather 
late train and went into a restau- 
rant about 9 o'clock in the evening 
for dinner. I happened to feel like 
eating a grouse or a duck or some- 
thing of that sort. I glanced at the 
menu and failed to see any birds. 

" 'Haven't you got any grouse or 
other game?' I asked the waiter. 

"_ 'We aint got any grouse,' was 
the reply. 'The only game we have is 
lobsters.' " 



The Wasp desires to call attention to the high quality of San Fran- 
cisco weeklies. While other cities have as many weeklies or more, 
there is no other city in the United States of the population of San 
Francisco which produces journals so well written, edited, and full of 
live matter as the Wasp, The Argonaut and the News Letter. 

It is undoubtedly because of their high quality that the daily papers 
of the city are so bitter against them. Wherever you find the adver- 
tising solicitor of a daily talking business, he is invariably making 
a sound like a Fourth of July against one or all of the publications 
mentioned. No statement is too strong or false for his purpose, and 
his imagination he works overtime creating fiction along these lines. 
It is his chief swagger, his painted bait in swinging business however 
small. The offense not altogether lies with him but with his Masters. 
For, let it be known and remembered for future reference, that the 
business offices of the daily newspapers of this city are combined 
against the weekly publications and give instructions to "knock" 
them to every rough-neck or oily advertising man they send out. 

Moreover, through virtue of larger commissions, they have forced 
upon the different local advertising agencies an agreement not to 
approve or handle advertising in the. weeklies, but to decry them 
on every occasion where there is a possibility of them getting any 
business. That is the true reason, Mr. Advertiser, for the anti-weekly 
mud-slinging which is constant palaver with these agencies. It is 
part of the "system" and to be kept dark. 

In all of this, however, and while the dailies have injured the 
weeklies greatly, their perfidious tactics have also worked against 
themselves. The grade of solicitors they employ, the get-or-die argu- 
ments used on patrons, the weedy failure to make good, their high- 
handed, low-operated system generally has cost them loss of busi- 
ness respect and a very large falling-off in returns. 

But still the weeklies carry the flower of the advertising. Not as 
much as they should but at any rate the "class" of it. And why? — 
with such propoganda flung to blacken them? Because advertisers 
in San Francisco are unusually intelligent, far more so than the 
dailies give them credit for being. They cannot be told that blue is 
yellow and made believe it. In truth they know "yellow" so very 
well that our various newspapers have at the outset a very bad case 
with them. And it is only because our advertisers are intelligent 
that the San Francisco weeklies continue to thrive. 

Just for a moment let us compare in relative value the advertising 
appearing in daily newspapers and in weeklies. 

The newspaper is glanced at for an instant and thrown away. 
It is supposed to furnish news and news is hot, quick stuff. There 
is little gravy with a Coney-Island bun. A few headlines tell the 
story and the reader is already through with the issue. He knows 
that there will be another in a few hours, with other headlines and a 
few new paragraphs. It is like a match with which he lights his cigar- 
ette, the convenience of an instant discarded as soon as used. He 
knows, too, through long experience that he cannot rely upon what 
he reads in it, that any story is apt to be contradicted tomorrow. 
He sees nothing in it but the bubbles of the moment. And if a news- 
continued on Page 7) 



THINGS LOCAL 

Wc know an artist who has 
solved the bread question. He buys 
it a day old and gets two loaves 
for a nickel. With the Bakers' Asso- 
ciation threatening to raise the 
price, perhaps, eventually, he will 
get only one for the nickel. But, 
at least, it is an excellent way out 
for those who have to pay taxes. 
Many a great poet arrived on stale 
bread. 



The poor corporations! The Gov- 
ernor finds it necessary to provide 
a sufficient revenue, made deficient 
in divers ways, and there is only 
one eat in sight to tie the can on. 
The corporations have begun (to 
look for a woods. It was ten per 
cent first and Senator Kehoe has 
mentioned twenty. Anything at all 
may happen. With so many in the 
Legislature from Los Angeles and 
environing country we really have 
not the hardihood to make a pre- 
diction. But we do hope that the 
cat will be able to drag the can. 



George J. Giannini, recently elect- 
ed president of the San Francisco 
Driving Club has a reputation for 
smart sayings. He and Rod Mc- 
Kenzie the Canadian, met in the 
park one day when each were driv- 
ing a pair and MeKenzie had with 
him two ladies. As the pace was 
slow they had time to exchange 
greetings. 

"Hello, Giannini," called Rod; 
"how do you like my sorrels?" 

"We call them blondes down 
here," returned Giannini succintly. 

AAAjuuuUAAAMAAAAAjUAAAAAA 

I 

I Shreve & Company 




* (Established 1852) 

X 

X One of the Largest Collec- 
X tions of 

2 

| ROOKWOOD POTTERY 
X 

y in the United States is now 
X on display on the second 
X floor. This collection in- 
jg eludes innumerable shapes 
•{• and sizes in Iris, Ombroso, 
X Vellum, Matt and Glaze fin- 
X ishes decorated in scenic and 
•> floral effects. 
•? 

*t* Fost Street and Grant Avenue 

•J* San Francisco 

I 



THE WASP 



Saturday, January 23, 1914 




INS AND OUTS OF 
THE SOCIAL WORLD 



BY GHACE TIBBITS 




A Real Love Affair 
Everyone was more than sur-' 
prised this week when the an- 
nouncement was made of the en- 
gagement of chic little Miss Bhoda 
Pickering to Mr. Tenny Williams of 
Tucson, Arizona. Rhoda is the old- 
er of the two Pickering girls, the 
daughters of Mr. and Mrs. Fred- 
erick Manthano Pickering, and is 
a very accomplished and talented 
maid. Both she and her sister 
Marie inherited a great deal of their 
mother's Frenchy ways and man- 
nerisms, for Mrs. Pickering is a very 
dainty Parisienne, and in spite of 
having lived years in America, she 
is still a Prench-woman to the tips 
of her highly polished ringers. Marie 
Pickering married right out of the 
schoolroom without even giving 
society any chance to greet her as 
a maid, for she and young Julius 
Kruttschnitt had been sweethearts 
from earliest infancy and as soon as 
Marie had reached her eighteenth 
birthday, they announced their en- 
gagement. Most of the Julius 
Kruttschnitts married life has been 
spent in Tucson, Arizona, where 
Mr. Kruttschnitt has been superin- 
tending his father's lines, and it 
was while visiting Marie that the 
charming Rhoda met her future 
husband. Mr. Williams, however, 
is a Californian by birth, being the 
son of Mr. and Mrs. Charles Wil- 
liams of San Jose. Mr. Charles Wil- 
liams owns one of the large daily 
papers in San Jose. 

Tenny Williams is a graduate of 
Stanford University and later took 
up banking in Tucson. Miss Pick- 
ering is now quite the envy of all 
the engaged maids for her engage- 
ment ring if one of most unusual 
beauty. It is a cabochon emerald, 
surmounted by diamonds in a 
charming platinum setting. The 
wedding is to take place before lent, 
so it will be an affair of the near 
future. 

-x- * # # 

His Color Shady 

Everyone is still atittering be- 
hind their tea-cups over an oecur- 
rance at one of the tea dances a 
couple of weeks ago. The ballroom 
was filled with handsomely gowned 
women and the musicians had just 
ended a spirited one-step when a 
certain fair maid of the younger set 
entered followed by one of the 
duskiest cavaliers, some say, that 
had ever entered that gilded hostel- 
ry. A general silence promptly en- 
sued, and everyone craned their 
necks to see what had happened. 
One glance!— and then buzz, buzz 
went the tongues. "Who was he?" 
and "Were our beaux so scarce that 
one must bring in one's flunkey?" 
Horror was written on every face 
as visions of Theodore Roosevelt's 
pet name for the natives of our 
island possessions, "little brown 



brothers" crossed their minds. Had 
it really come at last, and were we 
to make them our social equals? 
But no! Someone had guessed it, 
He was none other than his royal 
highness, the Crown Prince of Siam! 
The word was passed around, and 
the music started again, and the 
fair maid and the dusky Prince at- 
tempted an Anglo-Siamese rag to- 
gether. 



Walter, the Modest 
Rumor has it that that bon viv- 
ant and man about town Walter 
Magee is soon to become a benedict 
for the second time, and that his 
nuptials to Mrs. Sue Cox are liable 
to take place almost any day now. 
The erratic Walter hates publicity 
and formal ceremonies quite as 
much as his first wife and her fam- 
ily have always hated it, and he has 
vowed all along that there should 
be none of it for him, so he and 
the charming widow, whose first 
husband was Fred Cox, the adopted 
grandson of old Senator Cox of Sac- 
ramento, will slip quietly away 
some day very soon and have the 
knot tied by some over-worked 
country town justice. 



Discarding a Husband 
Quite in accordance with all of 
the various reports, Mrs. Thurman 
de Bolt has at last filed suit for 
divorce against her husband, in the 
Superior Court alleging failure to 
provide as the cause. Mrs. de Bolt, 
who is petite and very charming, 
is the daughter of Major Andrew 
S. Rowan, U. S. A., retired, who 
made himself world-famous in the 
Spanish-American war when he car- 
ried the message to Garcia. The 
gallant Major's first wife had died 
and he came to this city with all 
the glory of military honors and a 
widower as well. He wooed and 
won charming Mrs. Josephine de 
Greayer, who was a very wealthy 
and popular young matron in socie- 
ty. His daughter, who was always 
known as "Billie" Rowan, was at 
school in Los Angeles when she 
eloped with Thurman Alden de 
Bolt, who was at that time study- 
ing for the bar in the southern city. 
Their marriage quite displeased the 
elder Rowans, who have never ap- 
proved of the match. Several 
months ago when Mrs. de Bolt went 
to Europe with Mrs. John C. 
Black of Claremont, her divorce was 
rumored, and in fact, she intended 
applying for it then, but Mr. de 
Bolt signified his intention of con- 
testing the suit, and the affair was 
dropped. Mrs. de Bolt is now in 
New York, where she is quite ill- 
She intends remaining there until 
the case is settled, when she will re- 
turn to Paris again. 
Last winter Mrs. de Bolt was one 



of the most popular young matrons 
at all of the dancing affairs, and 
she and pretty, fair-haired little 
Mrs. Black were always very much 
in demand on account of their clev- 
er dancing. It is whispered that a 
certain tall, very eligible bachelor 
out here is more than usually in- 
terested in the outcome of the di- 
vorce proceedings and that when 
all of the necessary papers are sign- 
ed, an announcement is to be the 
next on the tapis. 

* * * * 

A Type Different 
Mrs. Charles Hopkins, who has 
been spending the past month as a 
guest at the St. Prancis, has re- 
turned to her home in Santa Bar- 
bara, after quite an extended visit 
here and in the East. She was ac- 
companied by her son Prince Hop- 
kins, who has laughingly been cal- 
led the "millionaire pedagogue." 
Prince Hopkins, who is tall and 
dalk and quite good to look at, 
inherited a goodly sized fortune 
from his father, the late Charles 
Hopkins. At the time of his fath- 
er's death, young Hopkins, who is 
a college graduate and a very ard- 
ent student, was teaching in a 
school for boys in Mission Canyon, 
and he was so absorbed in his 
work that even after inheriting his 
fortune, he continued with his 
teaching. This winter, much to the 
delight of the match-making mam- 
ma's of the mission town, he is to 
have his time filled, and will take 
more of a part in the season's 
gaieties than he has done before. 










Rodin, Chabas, Their Families and Other Artists Photograph Belonging to Mr. A. B. Spreckels 



Saturday, January 23, 19M 



THE WASP 



The Beautiful Gertrude 
Dr. George Elbright has been a 
host to several jolly little dinners 
lately, and i.s taking quite an ac- 
tive part in the doings of the four 
hundred, In spite of the faet that 
everyone predicted that the good- 
looking medico was quite done for, 
when his sensational divorce from 
Mrs. Lillian Sutton Hopkins 
Ebright was all dragged before the 
public eye. Perhaps the twice-mar- 
ried doctor just made up his mind 
to show them that he hadn't joined 
the ranks of the "down and outers". 
Everyone has been wondering how 
he would greet his pretty step- 
daughter Gertrude Hopkins, who i.s 
a bud of this season, when he saw 
her, but I have seen him speak 
most affectionately to the dark- 
eyed beauty, and they seem to be 
on the very best of terms. Gertrude 
by the way, is by all odds the 
beauty of this season, and with the 
Hopkins elan backing her, she is 
bound to be a success. Her father, 
the late Sherwood Hopkins, was a 
nephew of E. W. Hopkins, so Gert- 
rude is a second cousin of the stun- 
ning Hopkins sisters, Mrs. Gus and 
Will Taylor, Mrs. Fred McNear and 
Mrs. Cheever Cowdin. 
# * * * 

A Double Surprise 

An engagement announcement 
tea is always just a bit gayer than 
an ordinary tea, but a double an- 
nouncement one is just too good to 
be true! And this is what the 
guests of the two Little girls were 
treated to, who were bidden to their 
affair of last week at their home 
on Scott street. Miss Myrtle Little, 
the older of the two maids announc- 
ed her bethrothal to Roy Hills, an 
Easterner, who has only recently 
come here to reside, while Miss 
Mildred Little annuonced her 
engagement to young Harry 
Warren. Young Warren is a 
brother of Charles A. War- 
ren, whose marital difficulties have 
expended a great deal of printers 
ink, and who was married the other 
day to Mrs. Corrine Lindstrom Bak- 
er. Harry Warren inherited a large 
fortune from his father the late 
Charles A. Warren, which was ad- 
ministered by his older brother, 
who was appointed his guardian 
until he became of age. A double 
wedding is being planned for the 
two sisters, which will take place 
early in the spring. 

•X- * -X- * 

The Duke in Attendance 

I hear that one of the most strik- 
ing figures at that muchly discus- 
sed and post-mortemized affair, the 
Auditorium ball, was Mrs. Peter 
Martin, whose long spare form was 
incased in a handsome Oriental cos- 
tume. And beside the stunning 
Lily, faithful anl patient as ever, 
was the Duke of Mecklenburg- 
Schwerin, who is always her faith- 
ful body-guard. The affable Peter—, 
since being legally declared incom- 
petent, is no longer seen about with 
his masterful spouse, but remains 



home, along with his small sun, and 

their retin >f French servants. 

-Mis. peter no longer seems to oc- 
cupy that exalted position in so- 
ciety which has always been hers. 
Does she find it shallow and borc- 
ing or docs our smart set turn a 
slightly chilled shoulder on the pet 
of New York? Be it as it may, the 
Auditorium Ball was the first oc- 
casion since the "Soulptors Ball" of 
last spring that society in general 
has feasted its eyes on her and the 
blonde Duke. 



Her Various Talents 
Society is still agaping over the 
announced intention of pretty Mrs. 
.Tack Spreckcls to become a drawing 
room entertainer. But just why 
anyone should be surprised I don't 
know, as I heard a smart young 
matron remark at tea the other 
day, "for Edith is a faddess, always 
has been, and is ever ready to take 
up something new." Ever since her 
separation from the convivial Jack, 
the stunning Edith has been in- 
dulging her fads to the fullest. First 
it was painting under the able tui- 
tion of Francis McComas, the well- 
known artist, and she was sure of 
making a real name for herself as 
an artist. She rented a charming 
studio on Post street, and had at- 
mosphere about her in large sized 
chunks. Then she went in for lit- 
erature, and literary people, and 
her charming apartment, one of the 
Cliff Dwellers on the Washington- 
street hill, was the rendezvous for 
all the real "high brow" element. 
Then, last but not least, she falls 
in with Madame Barry, the drama- 
tic reader who has come to us with 
all of the prestige of having played 
to royalty, and the impressionable 
Edith has at last found her true 
vocation. Ever since the days be- 
fore she was wooed and won by 
Jack Spreckels she has exhibited a 
marked histrionic ability, and now 
tall, serpent-like Madame Barry has 
shown her how to make use of it. 
At the Adolph Spreckels Oriental 
ball the other night she took part 
with Madame Barry in a panto- 
mime illustrating verses from the 
Rubaiyat. This was one of Ma- 
dame Barry's masterpieces on the 
Continent, along with some of Law- 
rence Hope's "Indian Love Lyrics" 
and these with "Paolo and Fran- 
cesca" are to be the piece de resis- 
tance of the trio, the third being 
a musician to play their accom- 
paniments. Mrs. Jack is feeling very 
much more affluent these days since 
she was bequeathed a very sizable 
fortune in the will of the late Wil- 
liam Keith, who also left stunning 
Mrs. Willard Chamberlain his large 
shiny limousine. 

* -X- -X- -x- 
Exposition Visitors 
The opening of the Exposition is 
of course the chief topic of con- 
versation these days, and the 
wealthy and prominent visitors 
who are to be our guests at one 
time or another will occasion one 
elaborate entertainment after an- 



other, one of the first to reach 
our peaceful shores win be Vincent 

Astor and his party, who arc to 

come via the Panama Canal in the 
palatial Astor yacht ".Norma," and 
will reach here about the time of 
the grand opening. With young 
Astor will be his bride, who was 
.Miss Helen Huntington of New 
York and several other maids and 
young matrons of New York's most 
exclusive set. The "Norma" is 
quite the most marvelous yacht 
afloat, with all due respect to Col- 
onel .lackling's luxurious yacht 
"Cypress," which has been called a 
(loafing palace. The Astor yacht 
which, by-the-by, is the one the late 
Colonel John Jacob Astor had fit- 
ted up for his bride, who was Miss 
Madeline Force, when they went on 
their wedding trip, is lighted and 
heated by electricity and has large 
open fireplaces which lend much 
cheer to the interior. Of course 

(Continued on page 18) 



MRS. SARAH CECILIA CRANE 
Emmanuel Practitioner 

Hours 10 to 4 
1452 Divisadero St., near Geary St. 
Phone Fillmore 3929 



To visit San Francisco without eee- 
i";4 A. Andrews' Diamond Palace would 
be like visiting Europe without seeing 
Paris. It is a leading featuro of San 
Francisco, a marvel of beauty and ele- 
gance, and is unquestionably the most 
magnificent jewelry store in the world. 
Visitors and residents are cordially in- 
vited to examine the marvels of genius 
at on Kearny Street. Established 1850. 
Open 8 a. m. to 5:30 p. m. 



Phone Keamu 2578 




FOR EXCLUSIVE CUSTOM MADE 
SUITS AND COWNS 



16S POST STREET SAN FRANCISCO 



phone Franklin 5062 



I 

% MRS 



F. W. WOOD % 



Formerly F. Gerard of New York 



$ 



j» i umicii > r . \jerara or new I orit 'a 

Soivns and Silouses j| 

pj For Sale and Made to Order % 

% f 476 O'FARRELL STREET % 

'% SAN FRANCISCO |i 




SCHOOLS 




PAfWS,ATTENTION! 1 



i 



■S IK selecting a Business College A 

V i to which to send your boys ff 

& "or girls, you should rcmem- 8 

*> her that practically all the expert i? 

& short-hand reporters of the State 9 

m advise vou that Gallagher-Marsh ir 

S Short-Hand System is the best, 8 

«? and you should therefore send * 

a them to 8 

I Gallagher- Marsh! 

I Business College I 

j| 1256 MARKET STEEET £ 

1? which specializes on Short-Hand, 5 

jg Typing and Book-Keeping. Day ?! 

T> and Evening Classes. & 



HEALD'SK 



RUSSIAN IMPERIAL 
SCHOOL OF DANCING 

VERONINE VESTOFF 
(Late associate of Pavlowa) 

The Imperial Russian 
Ballet School Maintained 
by the Czar of Russia for 
training children to dance, 
is famous throughout the 
world for having brought 
the art of dancing to a 
point of perfection not ap- 
proached in any other 
country. 

Veronine Vestoff is the 
only accredited representa- 
tive of this school in the 
United States. 
Chateau Bohlig — Pine and 
Powell Sts., San 'Francisco, Cal. 



1215 Van Nesi Avenue 
SAN FRANCISCO 



16th & San Pablo Ave. 
OAKLAND 



PUCKETT'S 
College of Dancing 

ASSEMBLY HALL, 1268 SUTTEE 
CLASSES: 

Beginners' Classes Mondays 

Classes and Socials .... Wednesdays 

TANGO CLASSES Thursdays 

Assemblies Fridays 

FOR PRIVATE LESSONS 
PHONE FRANKLIN 118 



THE KIRLAW STUDIOS 

OF MODERN DANCES 
Miss Claribel Kirby announces Mr. 
Gilbert Littlejohn has joined the teach- 
ing; forces of this instituion. Private 
lessons or class instruction by appoint- 
ment only. Tea and refreshments if 
desired. 

435 Powell Street, 

Third Floor 

Telephone Sutter 2105 

Instructions given -with improved 

methods — Fox Trot, Lulu Fado, One 

Step, Hesitation, Tango, Maxixe and all 

the new dances. 



A. MAHR B. MIECZKOWSKI 

Graduates of the Imperial School 

Russian Dancing School 

Imperial Method Taught 

1509 Cough Street, S. F. 

Telephone West 493S 



THE WASP 



Saturday, January 23, 1914 



<25>WASP 

The Pacific Coast Weekly 



Published weekly by 

THE WASP PUBLISHING COMPANY (Inc.) 

49 GEAET ST., SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 
Phone, Douglas 1871 

MARTIAL DAVOUST - Managing Editor 

PAUL GWYNNE Editor 

GLENN H. JOHNSON Associate Editor 

SERALD C, HALSEY Attorney 

SUBSCRIPTION — In the United States, Canada, and Mexico, $5 a year in adrance. 
Entered at the San Francisco Postoffice as second-class matter. 



The Wasp will gladly publish notices of social events and other 
items of interest to its readers. Manuscripts should be at this office 
not later than Wednesday morning of the week's issue. 



Miss Clark, daughter of the House of Representatives, is to marry 
a newspaper man of New Orleans. Her dearest girl friend strongly 
decries it. She considers editors only a necessary evil. If the young 
lady would speak her real mind, she probably thinks they haven't 
enough money for modern matrimony. And this is quite true with 
respect to some women. Love no longer matters very much to the 
feminine heart which has been tutored in society. But we are glad 
that it does to Miss Genevieve Clark. 



Richard Hotaling who needs no introduction, his Hamlet having 
been avoided by so many people, and his wholesale spirits having 
made so many happ}', has proposed a plan to the exposition to pro- 
vide them with pigeons that the birds may bring attention to the 
height of the buildings. We cannot see that it is necessary the build- 
ings should appear high, but the flying pigeons are worth while of 
themselves. By the time a visitor has wandered to the end of the 
zone, he will probably have so very little left that a pigeon will look 
good to him as a matter of dinner. 



"The trouble is," says William Howard Taft," that many women 
have to marry not because they love the man of their choice, but be- 
cause it is a custom. The only way to avoid that condition is for a 
girl to become independent by learning a useful trade or take up busi- 
ness. Then when a man who is a scrub asks her to marry him she can 
say, "I can do better as I am independent." In this way she can 
make no mistake.'." This is a very sensible argument for Mr. Taft 
to put forth, and it looks as though he were improving mentally. 
But the plan he speaks of carries a shadow he does not reckon. The 
woman who enters into business usually leaves love at the door. For 
woman is a sensitive organism quickly affected by environement. She 
can be higher than God and lower than a thousand devils. Too free 
and practical association with the world rubs out her femininity and 
with it her charm. 



It is a good thing to realize once in a while that men and money 
are two different things. The estate of Lord Roberts amounted to 
about three hundred thousand dollars. .Yet he was one of the great- 
est men of the British Empire and will live forever in the hearts of 
the English people. It is something for the man in the mad rush 
for money to pause and releet over and apply to himself. After all, 
does it pay to sell our ideals, to trade the softness and spring beauty 
of life for the piling of gold and the acquiring of hard position? Is 
any man really happy who has left the fastidious, the leisure of se- 
lecetion behind him, the gentle consideration that makes his fellows 
love him, his hate for the vulgar, his appreciation of the fine. When 
the temperament becomes rigid and the hard front habitual (the 
constant rush for money has always this effect), then the melody 
and the song have gone forever. The game amounts to nothing 
without its dream. He who has reduced everything to cash is the 
sorriest character possible. 




MAURICE MAETERLINCK 
ON BELGIUM 

After Louvain, Malines, Termonde, 
Lierre, Dixmude, Nieuport — I speak 
only of the disasters of Flanders — 
Yperes is no more and Furnes is in 
Ruins. By the side of the great 
Flemish cities, Brussels, Antwerp, 
Ghent, and Bruges, those incompar- 
able living museums carefully cher- 
ished by our whole people, who are 
more devoted than any other to its 
traditions, they were a galaxy of de- 
lightful and hospitable little towns, 
not known nearly well enough to 
travelers. Each had its atmosphere 
ot peace, amenity, innocent gayety 
or aloofness; each possessed of its 
jealously guarded treasures, its bel- 
fries, its churches, its canals, old 
bridges, calm retreats, and houses 
of olden times clustered about the 
Hall it remained the immovable, 
magnificent, and gigantic witness to 
the power and opulence of other 
days, when Ypres, with Ghent and 
Bruges, was one of the three queens 
of the Western World, one of the 
busiest homes of human industry 
and activity and the cradle of great 
liberties. 

Sacred as Italian Shrines 
Yesterday — alas, I dare not say 
what it is now! This Place, with 
its great proportions, enormous 
but unspeakably beautiful, with 
its Cloth Hall at once imposing and 
elegant, sombre, proud, and yet cor- 
dial, was one of the most perfect 
and most marvelous of urban views 
in all our Old World. In another 
way, with other elements, under 
more austere skies, it deserved to be 
as precious to men, as sacred and 
inviolate as the Square of St. Mark's 
in Venice, the Signoria in Florence, 
the Piazza del Duomo in Pisa. It 
was a unique flawless work of art 
which evoked cries of admiration 
from even the most callous; an or- 
nament, one hoped, for all time, one 
of those things of beauty which, as 
the English poet said, "are a joy 
forever." 

I cannot believe that it is no more, 
and yet in this horrible war one 
must believe everything. And now, 
fatally, inevitably, the turn of 
Bruges will come, and after that the 
flood of war will ebb through 
Ghent, Antwerp and Brussels, 
and at one blow there will van- 
ish one of those corners of the 
world where most memories, histor- 
ical substance and beauties are 
stored. 

We Belgians have done what we 
could to defend it; we can do no 
more. The most heroic armies are 
powerless to prevent destruction. 

There remains to us but one hope 
immediate intervention from 
neutral nations. To them our an- 
guished eyes are turned. 

Two great nations, especially Italy 
and the United States hold in 
their hands the fate of our last 
treasures, whose loss would count 
among the most serious and irre- 
parable ever suffered by civilized 
humanity in the course of the cent- 
uries. 

These nations can do what they 



wish; it is time that they did what 
it is no longer allowable to refrain 
from doing. The statements of offic- 
ial Germany show plainly how 
greatly it values the opinions of 
the United States. 

We need not tell Italy how prec- 
ious are our endangered cities. She 
more than other lands, is the land 
of noble cities. Our cause is her 
cause. She owes us her support. In 
destroying a work of beauty, her 
progress, her genious, her gods, are 
outraged. 

As for America, she represents 
better than any other nation the 
future. It behooves her to think of 
the days that are to follow this war. 
When the great peace descends to 
earth deserted, shorn of all its ad- 
ornments. Those spots are not nu- 
merous where the efforts of centu- 
ries, the success acheived by the 
will of patience, power, and genious 
of a race, have made this earth 
beautiful. This little corner of 
Flanders, over which death now 
hovers, is one of these sacred spots. 
Should it perish, men yet to be 
born men who perhaps may yet be 
happy, will lack memories and ex- 
amples which nothing can replace. 



CANADA ENTERS FIELD 

Steel manufacturers have discov- 
ered that Canada is entering the 
steel field as an active competitor 
of the American product. It has 
just been learned here that one 
large order for steel rails went to a 
Canadian manufacturer at a price 
$2 per ton less than the prevailing 
price in the United States. It is 
pointed out that the advantage lies 
with the Canadian manufacturers 
at this juncture, as labor costs less 
and transportation from the great 
ore districts rules at a lower ton 
rate than it does in the United 
States. 

It is said among steel men that 
the war conditions have acted as 
restoration of the protective tariff, 
reduced by the present administra- 
tion in the Underwood bill. With 
exception of Canada, American steel 
has no competitor, owing to the 
practical shutting down of Euro- 
pean competition. 

The interesting phase as given by 
one specialist on trade conditions 
is that while the Canadians are en- 
abled to compete with the Ameri- 
can product the situation does not 
reverse itself, for there is a Canad- 
ian protective tariff on steel of $7 
a ton, which has the comfortable 
effect of enabling the Canadian 
manufacturers to go after Ameri- 
can business with the assurance 
that there can be no competition 
on their side of the border. 

It is noted that Canada has a 
comparatively small steel mill ca- 
pacity, and that consequently her 
activity in this direction does not 
actually encroach on American pro- 
duction to any great degree, though 
it is pointed out, should the war 
continue for an indefinite period, 
this might result in a great increase 
in Canadian milling capacity with 



! 



Saturday, January 23, 1914 

a view to even more active compe- 
tition, not only in the United 
States Itself, but in Europe. 

t'uder ordinary circumstances 
Belgium, Germany and England 
have been the chief competitors of 
the United States, while Canada's 
part has been regarded as wholly 
Inconsequential, her mill capacity 
being hardly sufficient for her own 
needs. Signs point to considerable 
Increase in this capacity. 



Page Popular 
There is no entertaining now in 
London except on a small scale and 
at short notice, dinners of six or 
eight persons, in which members 
of the embassies and legations fig- 
ure largely. The American Ambas- 
sador, with his genial courtesy and 
agreeable conversation, has won all 
hearts, and if he were not too busy 
to accept all invitations would nev- 
er be allowed to dine alone. Mrs. 
Page and the members of the Page 
family are now at home and are 
much missed in London. 

Probably the busiest centers of 
activity in London are the War of- 
fice at Whitehall and the Red Cross 
headquarters in Pall Mall. The 
War Office has added an extra story 
in wood to the great stone build- 
ing erected some Ave or six years 
ago, to provide sufficient offices for 
the additional work necessitated by 
the war, and from the court below 
the effect of this wooden structure 
is very amusing. It does not, how- 
ever, show from the street. In the 
War Office the most perfect system 
prevails. 
A visitor, for example, calling on 

General Sir J C , fills out at 

the inquiry office a slip, giving his 
name, the nature of his business, 
etc. He is then conducted by a 
page without delay directly to the 
General's office, where he is received 
by a very polite secretary, is asked 
to wait a moment in the reception 
room while his name is announced, 
and then is either shown in at once 
or given an appointment for the 
following day. Once in the War 
Office, one may walk about at will, 
calling on whomever one wishes to 
see, and through their secretaries 
receiving always the most prompt 
and courteous treatment. 

'Even Lord Kitchener's secretary 
has time for all inquirers, though 
few are allowed to penetrate into 
the "sanctum sanctorum" of the in- 
ner office. The calm and silence of 
the War Office suggest more a per- 
fectly run hospital than the head- 
quarters of a nation at war. 



The man's shirt-front was far 
from spotless, and his waistcoat 
and coat were covered with grime 
and grease, but a large buttonhole 
bouquet was placed on the lapel 
Of his coat. 

N "What do you think of this?" he 
said to a casual acquaintance, 
pointing to the bouquet. 
"Where do you think I got it?" 
"Don't know," admitted the other. 
"Perhaps it grew there." 



THE WASP 

Weeklies versus the Dailies 

» Continued from Page 3) 

paper had a million circulation it Would in this reapect make not a 

whit of difference, except maybe in its "want ad" columns. Once 
in five hundred times, perhaps, its advertising is read. The daily 
really fulfills only one purpose, the presenting of headlines to the 

public. Its body of writing is rely trash and unattractive. 

Bui the men who write the Weeklies have time to write them, 
and most often they are journalists of reputation and style. From 
the week's mad conglomeration of news' guesswork the clever weekly 
presents concisely, and in a manner which holds the attention, the 
completed picture of facts in all its bearings and probable results. 
It delves fearlessly into the substrata of effects and handles frankly 
and pithily all local and social doings with an intimate spotlight 
of compiled knowledge of men, women, and things in general. 

It tells the stories the newspapers did not get, the stories which 
flash the real motive rightly ascribed. It has the time to get them 
and the talent to present them. It takes the whole local scheme and 
translates it brightly into a pattern of the utmost interest. It does 
not review but elucidates. It reveals the meat underlying the kernel. 
It is possessed of leisure, is written in leisure, and is read at leisure. 
And that means that all of its advertising, always placed beside 
reading matter or on the covers, is digested fully. One issue lies 
on the library table for a week and all that time it is handled and 
read. Its advertising is set artistically. By way of proof 
to an argument that needs none, we might point out that the highest 
advertising rates in the world are paid certain weeklies published 
in the East. And in any city a weekly intensely local is the best 
advertising medium to be had. 

Furthermore its circulation is wholly among the moneyed people. 
Every copy of an issue, carrying an advertiser's story, finds the 
attention of some of these. Every copy is an arrow well-shot, reach- 
ing its mark, and bringing results. But with respect to high-class 
advertising, and we could truthfully add most other kinds, the 
bloated, boasted circulation of the daily newspaper is waste. Of 
what use is a circulation south of Market to a business man adver- 
tising expensive gowns on Grant Avenue? 

But the phase of the story most regrettable is yet to come. The 
San Francisco weeklies in the getting of advertising have been too 
often guilty of "knocking" each other. It is not the sort of organ- 
ized "knocking" to be heard from the solociting lips of the dailies 
and undoubtedly in most eases it has resulted from the necessities 
of the individual solicitor ; and San Francisco has certainly some bad 
samples who have been educated on the dailies, and who drift from 
one journal to another always "knocking" the last. By promising to 
take away business from the publication just left, they usually manage 
to get a job. 

There is only one way to improve the situation. The weeklies must 
get together and blacklist these men, refuse them employment abso- 
lutely, and, once and for all, explain to them emphatically that their 
kind of business is not wanted. 

And at the same time it should be arranged by special orders 
given out by the business managers of the leading weeklies, that any 
advertising solicitor who "knocked" another weekly would be 
warned only once and on the second offense discharged. For this 
method of getting business is wrong, tactless and false. The Wasp 
has tried to follow strictly its ideals in such matters but it is rattier 
difficult doing so alone. 

The greatest asset of any advertising man is the quality of being 
a gentleman. And he is not a gentleman who slanders another im- 
portant weekly, however much a competitor it may be, and, besides, 
he is injuring business generally and permanently. 




The Perpetual Performance 

'Yes," said the bachelor, with the 
conscious pride of sacrifice, "I make 
a point of giving up certain pleas- 
ures during lent." 

"Hull!'' snorted the Married Man. 
"You bachelors have a cinch on 
that sort of thing. What are forty 
days to three hundred and sixty- 
five?" 



Getting Him Good 

Business was in full swing at the 
church bazaar when a young man 
strolled around evidently with no 
intention of purchasing anything. 
As he passed one stall a young lady 
seller detained him. 

"Won't you buy a cigarette-holder 
sir?" she asked. 

"No, thank you, I don't smoke," 
was the reply. 

"Or a penwiper worked with my 
own hands?" 

"I don't write." 

"Then do have this nice box of 
chocolates?" 

"I don't eat sweets." 

The young lady's patience was ex- 
hausted. 

"Sir," she said grimly, "will you 
buy this cake of soap?" 

He bought it. 



Mme. Mariette Corsets 

Women with a love for fine un- 
dergarments will be delighted with 
the finished workmanship and ex- 
quisite materials of the Mme. Ma- 
riette Corsets. 

They are designed by French 
artists for American women. 

Freedom of motion and natural- 
ness of pose are the present re- 
quirements in corsetry. The light- 
ness and flexibility of the Mme. 
Mariette corsets, the low bust ef- 
fects, secure the utmost mobility 
to the wearer. 

Let our expert corsetieres show 
you the charming new Mme. Ma- 
riette models. 

Prices $5.00 to $25.00. 

D. SAMUELS 

THE LACE HOUSE 
N. W. Cor. Stockton and O'Farrell 



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t ± 

•:• Established 1868. * 

t X 

I Goldstein & Co. ! 

4 Official Costumers * 

? and Wig Makers * 



For all leading San Francisco and 
Coast Theatres. Private Theatri- 
cals a specialty. 



•:• 883 Market Street, Lincoln Bldgf. 4* 



PATRONIZE 



%/&mui/es$?/ia%tnaa/> 



DISPENSING CHEMISTS 



Store 1, Cor. Sutter and Devlsadero Streets 
Store 2, Cor. ILiight St. and Masonic Are. 
Store 3, Cor Sacramento St. and Presidio 

Ave. 
Store 4, 84 Post Street, east of Kearny 
Store 5, Cor. Carl and Cole Streets 
Store 6, Cor. Union and Sterner Streets 
Store 7, Cor. Powell and Sutter Streets 



THE WASP 



Saturday, January 23, 1914 



THE WOMAN BEAUTIFUL 




By Catharine Carroll 

I have received the following let- 
ter from a self-supporting woman, 
which seems to be quite to the 
point: 
"Catharine Carroll, 

"The Wasp: 
"I seldom pick up a paper without 
seeing in it some reference to the 
'working girl,' how she should 
spend the, too often, pitiful sum 
she earns, what she should do with 
her leisure time, what proportion 
she should save, spend on hats, 
dresses, etc. 

"It seems to me that these people 
who are so interested in the affairs 
of the 'working girl' might better 
devote their time to having some 
law passed to prohibit basement 
salesrooms in shops. Also interest 
themselves to obtain better work- 
ing conditions in factories, and 
more sanitary toilet arrangements 
for women employees." 

* * * * 

"I began my business career at 
the splendid wage of two dollars 
and a half per week. After twelve 
years of constant effort to improve 
my condition I am now, at the age 
of twenty-eight, receiving thirty- 
five dollars a week and am doing 
the same amount of work for which 
two men were formerly paid twenty- 
five and thirty dollars a week, re- 
spectively. My firm is thereby sav- 
ing twenty dollars a week! 

# * # # 

"I know by sad experience what a 
bad effect the basement salesroom 
has on a girl's health and spirits, 
for I worked in one while I was fit- 
ting myself to become an expert 
stenographer, bookkeeper and pri- 
vate secretary." 

"What we women do with our 
money after we have earned it is 
really nobody's business but our 
own. 

' "I have never yet seen any table 
of expenses prepared for young men 
who earn their own living, viz.: how 
much he shall spend for whiskey 
or beer, cigars, cigarettes and cloth- 
ing. No paper would print any- 
thing so foolish. 

"There seems to be a general idea 

ife Telephone Douglas 5712 J? 

I f 

f Jackson & Merwin 1 



EXCLUSIVE 
HAIR SHOP 



I 



jS jiccommodaiions for 97/en 9> 

1 78 GEARY STREET f 

,§ San Francisco 9» 



that self-supporting women are en- 
tirely different mentally and every 
other way from the stay-at-home 
woman. Women are condescending 
or are unkind to working girls and 
the average man shows very little 
courtesy to them. I mean the in- 
tangible, deferential attitude that 
he assumes toward the stay-at-home 
variety of girl." 

"This letter is not written in a 
spirit of personal complaint, al- 
though I have been through all 
gradations of poverty since I start- 
ed my business career." 

"I determined to succeed. I have 
worked hard and I feel that I have 
my feet firmly planted on the first 
rung of the ladder of success. 

"Yours sincerely, 

"ONE OF THEM." 

From the above letter it would 
seem that the good people who are 
working, or think they are, for the 
happiness and welfare of the "work- 
ing girl" should first of all get the 
idea firmly fixed in their minds 
that she has "eyes, ears and dimen- 
sions," just the same as other girls. 
She has the same desires, hopes and 
aspirations, and that nature gave 
her the same tendency to bodily 
weaknesses, which are greatly ag- 
gravated by the hard work and 
nervous strain she must undergo in 
order to get enough food to con- 
tinue to work just for a poor living. 



Engraving Company Offers Splen- 
did Service 

The record of service that the 
Franklin Engraving Company has 
to its credit is due to the combina- 
tion of skilled workmen and com- 
plete equipment for which it is 
known. Much special work has 
been given to this concern because 
of the high order of work it turns 
out. /Everything is done under 
the supervision of experts, and all 
work, before it leaves the shop, is 
given a close examination. 

All the work of The Wasp is done 
by the Franklin Engraving Com- 
pany. A thorough test of the ma- 
jority of the engraving concerns in 
San Francisco has convinced us 
that, for all-around efficiency, the 
(Sutter 4542), or to this office 
equal. 

There is absolutely no connection 
between The Wasp and the Cali- 
fornia Photo Engraving Co. The 
W^p desii-es jto emphasize this; 
point with all its friends. 

Any work that one may care to 
send to the Franklin Engraving 
Co. will be received at this office as 
an accommodation. A call, either 
to the Franklin concern direct 
(Sutter 4542), or to this office 
(Douglas 1871) will receive prompt 
attention. A day and night service 
is a factor of the policy of this es- 
tablishment, a factor that will be 
appreciated by everybody who oc- 
casionally needs work done in a 
hurry. 





Members of the Bohemian Club 
played hosts to their families and 
friends at a brilliant dinner dance 
last week, at which merriment and 
good cheer brought the affair to a 
gay whirl of fun, such as is only 
known to Bohemians. 

Deviating from the custom of the 
usual dinner with dancing at its 
conclusion, the newer style of in- 
terspersing the courses with a dance 
was followed and that it was a 
success was attested by the smiles 
and laughter of those who shared 
in the merriment. 

The affair took place in the jinks 
room, which had been elaborately 
decorated for the occasion. Joseph 
S. Thompson, William E. Hopkins 
and William B. Waldron had the 
function in charge and to them 
belong the felicitations of both 
hosts and guests. 

Clever entertainment added to the 
charm of the affair. There were se- 
lections ,by Charles Bulotti, Veil 
Bakeweli, Charles Dickman and 
"Billy" Hopkins. 

* * -X- -X- 

The Deutsche)- Club dance, which 
took lace last Friday at Native Sons 
Hall, proved a decided success and 
was enjoyed by scores of members 
and their guests. The ballroom was 
beautifully decorated and all of the 
latest terpsichorean innovations 
were indulged in. 

* * * * 

Miss Beatrice Dorothea Olds clev- 
erly presented a dramatic interpre- 
tation of Maeterlinck's "Mona Van- 
na" at a meeting of the literary sec- 
tion of the Sequoia Club Thursday 
evening. Miss, Olds added interest 
to the affair by reading a personal 
letter from the author. Mrs. Ella 
M. Sexton presided. 

-x- * -x- * 

Elaborate preparations are under 
way for the celebration of Kaiser 
Wilhelm's birthday at the German 
House on Wednesday evening, Jan- 
uary 27. Prominent Germans of this 
city and bay counties will be pres- 
ent. A literary and musical pro- 
gram will be presented. 

■X- -X- * # 

The question, "What Shall We Do 
With the Peace Palace at The 
Hague?" was discussed at a meeting 
of the Twentieth Century Club on 
Tuesday. Mrs. Wallace R. Pond, 
president of the club, presided, as- 
sisted by Mrs. Wellyn B. Clark, Mrs. 
W. C. Colson, Mrs. F. A. Wickett, 
Mrs. E. B. Brown, Mrs. E. A. Nicker- 
son and Mrs. J. B. Crow. 

* -X- * * 

A musical and dramatic program 
entertained the members of the 
Papyrus Club at their regular so- 
cial meeting which took place Wed- 



nesday at the clubroom, 420 Sutter 
street. The affair had been an- 
nounced well in advance and a 
large audience was the result. 

"Our Aunt From California," a 
clever playlet, was presented under 
the direction of Reginald Travers, 
and interpreted by Mrs. Martyn 
Troy, Miss Margaret Potter, Mrs. 
Celine Straus, Mrs. Wade Williams 
and Mrs. William Jay Conroy. 

The musical program was pre- 
sented by Frances Eleanor Larsen 
at the piano and Rose Langenegar 
in a pretty arrangement of songs. 

Mrs. Florence Richmond, presi- 
dent of the club, took a leading 
part in welcoming the members and 
their guests. 

# # # * 

One of the most brilliant social 
events of the season was the grand 
ball given by the Young Men's He- 
brew Association last Saturday 
evening at the Hotel St. Francis. 

The Colonial and Italian ball- 
rooms were utilized for the occa- 
sion and presented a wonderful 
spectacle as beautifully gowned 
belles and matrons glided over the 
floor in the latest steps. All of the 
boxes were subscribed and were oc- 
cupied during the evening by gay 
parties. 

The attendance reached 1,500 and 
fully $4,000 was derived. The pro- 
ceeds will be used to extend the 
philanthropic, religious, and social 
work of the organization. 

Mrs. Moses Heller headed a com- 
mittee of 75 patronesses who work- 
ed untiringly in the sale of tickets. 
George H. Ross, president of the 
Association, took a leading part in 
arrangements. 



P. V. Matraia, 
President 



Julius Eppstei 
Secretary 



jirt floral Company 

Incorporated 

HOTEL ST. FRANCIS 

225 POWELL ST., SAN PEANCISCO 

Tel. Keamy 3524 and Sutter 1372 




WEAR THE 
NEW PATENT 



Invisible Bifocals f 



and avoid annoyance and incon- y 
venience in changing glasses when 
you wish to see far or near, as the 
case may be. Both the reading and 
distance corrections are combined. 

Mayerle's Glasses 

are highly recommended for read- 
ing, working or to see at a dis- 
tance, weak eyes, poor sight, 
strained, tired, itchy, watery, in- 
flamed, gluey eyes, floating spots, 
crusty or granulated eyelids, 
cross eyes, astigmatism, headache, 
dizziness, children's eyes and com- 
plicated cases of eye defects. Two 
gold medals and diploma of honor 
awarded at California Industrial 
Exposition, also at Mechanics' 
Fair, October, 1913, to 

GEORGE MAYERLE 

Graduate German Expert Optician 

Established 20 Years 

960 Market St., San Francisco 

Opposite the Empress Theatre 

Mayerle Eyewater at Druggists' 

50c; by mail 65c 






Saturday, January 23, 1911 



THE WASP 




Repartee de Luxe 

Sharp personalities were flung 
back and forth with amazing aim 
at the Commonwealth Club's mock 
trial, which too place last week at 
the St. Francis, with prominent ju- 
rists and members of the bar mak- 
ing comedy of their calling, The 
personal jabs .which the partici- 
pants threw recklessly at one an- 
other and their smart repartee kept 
the big audience of prominent men 
and women in a constant uproar. 

Stern magistrates threw their ju- 
dicial dignity to the winds in pok- 
ing fun at the lawyers, whose wit 
and biting sarcasm would have 
meant many a day for contempt in 
a more serious hour within a real 
court of law. 

Beverly L. Hodghead, president of 
the club, stood trial in a mimic 
court over which presided Judge 
Prank H. Kerrigan. Former Judge 
Marcel E. Cerf, whose judicial am- 
bitions were blasted last November, 
was counsel for the defense. His as- 
sociate counsel was Samuel M. 
Shortridge, whose senatorial aspira- 
tions met a similar fate. 

On one occasion Cerf arose to en- 
ter a legal objection and criticized 
the court. "What do you know 
about it," retorted Judge Kerrigan, 
"you're no longer a judge." 

Then Shortridge arose to object, 
pointing his familiar index finger 
at the court. "They don't care to 
hoar you argue," shouted the judge. 
"All they want is to look at your 
finger,' 

Whereupon Cerf arose with the 
announcement that he had a recall 
petition against Judge Kerrigan. 
Asked how many names he had se- 
cured, he curtly presented the court 
with a telephone directory. 
; Unanimously the recall of Kerri- 
gan was voted by the merrymakers 
and Corf ascended to the bench. 

"Too bad you didn't get there 
last November instead of now," 
snapped Kerrigan, as he left the 
bench. 

And thus continued the good hu- 
mor throughout the evening. 



Mixed Aairs 

A quick succession of national airs 
caused a strange confusion in pa- 
triotic response ono eveninf last 
week at the Orpheum, resulting in 
no little embarrassment to those 
Who hold their country's tunes 
dear. 

A pair of xylophone artists upon 
the stage had been entertaining the 
audience by the mastery of the in- 
strument and had rendered a num- 
ber of operatic selections with rare 
ability. Suddenly they began a med- 
ley of national airs. 

First the "Wacht am Rhein" was 
heard, and those of the Kaiser's 
subjects who were present led the 
applause. Then came "La Marseil- 
laise," with equal response. 

"God Save the King" followed, 
and a party of Englishmen and 
women in a box arose in patriotic 
response to the British anthem. See- 
ing the box party rise, the audience 
hurriedly jumped to its feet, mis- 
taking the British anthem for 
"America," the tunes being alike. 

When the selection ended, the 
audience was seated again. But an 
instant later the musicians struck 
up "The Star Spangled Banner," 
and the bewildered Orpheumites in 
the body of the house rose again 
while those in the pox remained 
seated. 

For a moment all were perplexed 
and then a burst of laughter show- 
ed that the error was understood. 



Both Very Strong 

Samson had been the subject of 
the morning's discourse in a Sun- 
day School class of a San Francisco 
synogoguc, presided over by a well- 
known attorney of the younger set. 
20— WASP 

A score or more of youthful pupils 
had marveled at the strength of 
Samson and had kept their teacher 
busy with questions. 

At the close of the lesson, the 
class was instructed to prepare dur- 
ing the week a brief composition 
comparing Samson with Hercules. 
This was the briefest of the compari- 
sons, penned by a seven-year-old 
lad: 

"Samson and Hercules were both 
very strong men. If they had had 
a wrestling match, I am sure it 
would have been a tie." 



Those Overworked Conductors 

At last relief may be in sight for 
overworked street car conductors. 
Their troubles may vanish as if by 
magic; their lives may be one end- 
less ride of pleasure. No longer may 
they be haunted by the hankering 
cry of "move forward, please," but 
a wild rush of passengers for the 
front may make the conductor's 
day one long dream of joy. 

At any rate, such a conductor's 
panacea has been 'suggested. It 
has been kept a guarded secret to 
be forwarded in a sealed envelope 
by registered mail to the head of 
the car company with hope of re- 
ward. It was made aloud in a Mar- 
ket-street car. Its author was a 





We carry a full line of Japanese 

Silks, Kimonos, Mandarin 

Coats, Linen Goods, etc. 

MAIN STORE 

157 GEARY STREET 

Bet. Stockton and Grant Ave. 
Phone Dousla. 4628 

SAN FRANCISCO, CALIFORNIA 



111 E. COLORADO ST. 

Pasadena, Cal. 

Factory Office : Yokohama, Japan. 



business man of local prominence 
and he spoke in tones so loud that 
they reached the ear of The Scout, 
many paces away. 

The car was crowded with men 
and women passengers. It was the 
rush hour of the day— going home 
time. Men were holding tightly to 
swinging straps and pretty shop 
frills surged through the crowded 
passage ways, each vainly hoping 
to attract the eye of a trousered 
seat-holder, more gallant than 
fatigued. 

Men and boys were packed in a 
solid mass on the rear platform. 
More passengers crowded on at each 
crossing. "Move forward, please," 
shouted the conductor at each stop, 
but his plea was always in vain. 

"I'll wager I could keep those 
people moving forward and have 
passage way always assured," said 
the resourceful merchant to his 
friend, the two packed tightly on 
the rear platform. 

"I'd put a sign on each car like 
this: 'The best looking girls are 
in the front seats'." 



An Old Political Skeleton 
A grim skeleton of the old 
Sehmitz administration was drag- 
ged out of its dark closet and re- 
vealed before a coroner's jury a few 
days ago, when Coroner T. B. W. 
Leland was conducting his inquest 
into the elevator accident at the 
CalifbrnifiPacific Building, iwhen 
one man was killed and nearly a 
dozen sustained serious injuries. 
. It was after all the evidence 
had been submitted and the testi- 
mony of many witnesses heard, that 
Dr. Leland pulled open the door 
of the political closet and hauled 
out the skeleton. 

He had been admonishing the 
jury of its duty in making such 
resolutions as would tend to pre- 
vent a recurrence of the accident. 
He told the jurors that their duty 
was to conserve human life. And 
to impress upon their minds the 
need of stringent measures, he 
brought the hitherto unnoticed 
skeleton to public view. 

He explained that an elevator ac- 
cident in 1902 had resulted in a 
recommendation jtor a municipal 
elevator inspector by the coroner's 
jury. Public opinion endorsed the 
idea, he said, and the Schmitz ad- 
ministration found itself obliged to 
follow the suggestion. 

But a political henchman was in 
line for reward, and he knew noth- 
ing of elevators. He was only a 
boilermaker. So to meet the situa- 
tion, the office of "City Elevator and 
Boiler Inspector" was created, ac- 
cording to the coroner. 

To carry out the duties of his 
office, the "inspector" examined boil- 
ers but nary an elevator ever be- 
came under his scrutininzing in- 
spection. Finally, said Dr. Leland, 
the word "elevator" was dropped 
from the inspector's title when pub- 
lic sentiment had subsided, and the 
city was left without a municipal 
official to inspect elevators. 



10 



THE WASP 



Saturday, January 23, 1914 




A Woman's Power 

You have kissed me back Irom the 
gates of Hell; 
Tou have kissed me hack to the 
Eden tree; 
You have kissed me up to the face 
of God, 
And a world of men shall hear of 
me. 



Muir Immortal 
Although he was not a maker of 
many hooks, John Muir achieved 
for himself an enviable place in our 
prose literature. He belonged to 
that exceptional school of nature 
writers whose keen recognition of 
the beauties of the objective world 
clothed itself in words of rare felic- 
ity and aptitude. Simplicity and 
eloquence are admirably mingled 
in his descriptions of the scenery 
that he loved. One of his last books 
comes under the prosaic classifica- 
tion of a guidebook to the Yosemite 
Written by anyone else it would be 
a guide book, nothing more. In 
Muir's hands it becomes a little mas- 
terpiece of literature, in which this 
poet-scientist gives to the world a 
pen picture of a region whose glo- 
ries he has done so much to pre- 
serve from vandalism for the enjoy- 
ment of posterity. In his penetra- 
tion into the secrets of nature and 
in his gift of verbal expression he 
could claim kinship with Gilbert 
White, Thoreau, Eichard Jeffries. 
Were it not that we still have John 
Burroughs, the passing of John 
Muir would mark the close of this 
splendid line of nature interpreters. 
It is to be hoped that his literary 
executors will collect and publish 
in book form some of the many 
magazine articles that came from 
his pen. 



Vernon Quite Notorious 

, Vernon Castle was the first to ar- 
rive at the L. I, K. C. match in 
Gotham. He had five German 
sheepdogs with him and the crowd 
stood and stared when the dancer, 
his dogs and two men servants ar- 
rived from Manhasset. Castle said 
that he couldn't stay for the judg- 
ing. He told the Sun reporter that 
his great hobby was training po- 
lice dogs. "I teach them and then 
my man here, Walter Ash, keeps 
them up to their work. Dancing 
is my business, but dogs my pleas- 
ure." 

Vernon Castle has been appoint- 
ed sheriff of Nassau county. He 
wears the badge of his office and 
says he means to depend a lot on 
his dogs in "times of trouble." 



Calling His Hand 

A story from Paris of a pe- 
culiar incident at Brussels recently 
is attracting much comment and 
considerable amusement. 

Two German officers were dining 
in a restaurant in the Belgian cap- 
ital. At the adjoining table were 
two men conversing in English. The 
German officers showed signs of dis- 
pleasure at the use of English by 
their neighbors, but the latter took 
no notice of the annoyance of the 
Germans and continued their talk. 

Finally the Germans could stand 
it no longer and one of the officers 
arose and approaching the table at 
which the strangers were sitting 
said: "I will be obliged if you will 
stop talking in English; it dis- 
pleases and annoys me." 

One of the men thereupon asked 
the officer for his card and held out 
his own. The officer looked at the 
card, drew himself up, clicked his 
heels together, saluted and mur- 
mured his excuses. 

The stranger's card bore the name 
of Brand Whitlock, Envoy Extra- 
ordinary and Minister Plenipoten- 
tiary of tire United States to Bel- 
gium. 



Noblesse Oblige 

Sir Robert and Lady Hadfield are 
the donors of a hospital of 100 beds 
for wounded at Boulogne, which 
has been accepted by the Joint War 
Committee and the Anglo-French 
Committee. Lady Hadfield is an 
American, a sister of former Attor- 
ney General George Wickersham. 
This new gift is to be known as the 
Anglo-American Hospital. 

Sir William Osier, regius professor 
of medicine at Oxford, has consent- 
ed to act as honorary physician, 
Major Armstrong as commandant 
and Hugh Left, consulting surgeon 
of the London Hospital, and Mrs. 
de Winton, matron, have generously 
given their services. 

The hospital is established, and 
although Sir Robert and Lady 
Hadfield have fully equipped and 
are maintaining it, subscripitions 
will be received for its extension and 
for extra comforts for the wounded. 
Sir William Osier in a letter to 
Lady Hadfield says Lady Osier is 
receiving many good things from 
America. The accommodations in 
the hospital are limited to 100 beds 
at present, but it is hoped the ca- 
pacity may soon -be doubled. 



What About Your French 

Numerous opportunities for the 
testing of British-spoken French oc- 
cur nowadays, writes a correspond- 
ent, and I have no doubt very sim- 
ple things will often prove a stumb- 
ling block. I remember an experi- 
ence of my own. It happened at 
Rouen during a little tour of 
France with a couple of friends. I 
managed to act as interpreter for 
the party and got along very well 
until as I paid the bill at a Rouen 
hotel the lady who took the money 
observed "Fay boo-tong." I smiled 
sadly. She with an even sadder 
smile repeated the observation. She 
gave me a receipt so it could not 
have been anything of financial im- 
portance, but I went away ignorant 
of her meaning. I looked up "bou- 
ton," and found that it meant in 
addition to "button" such other 
things as "bud" and even "pim- 
ple." 

Neither word could have been 
what she meant, of that I was sure; 
but not until four hours later, as 
our train approached Paris, did it 
dawn upon me that the lady had 
simply been saying it was a fine 
day— "Fait beau temps." But she 
really said, "Boo," not "Bo," and 
that was the cause of the trouble. 



New York Not In It 

Visiting New York friends is a 
San Francisco girl, young and pret- 
ty and sweet. One evening she was 
out with a party of people older 
than herself, and after the theatre 
some one suggested that they go to 
a rather lively restaurant and dance 
a while. The others objected on the 
ground that it might not be a pro- 
per place for a young and unsophis- 
ticated girl like Miss Blank. 

"Oh," she said with quite an air, 
"you needn't bother about my 
youth or my unsophistioation. I 
am 21 years of age and I voted 
at the November election." 

No other woman in the party had 
a record like that and the Califor- 
nia girl was taken along without 
further question. 



This (story is being told \of a 
young San Francisco lawyer. The 
lawyer was arguing a case before a 
judge, and, desiring to illustrate 
by supposing a case, he did so as 
follows: — 

"We will suppose, your Honor," 
he said, "that your Honor were to 
steal a horse — " 

"No, no, no!" interrupted the 
judge; not at all, not at all, sir. 
'Taint a supposable case, sir." 

"Very well, begging your Honor's 
pardon," said the eager lawyer, with 
more zeal than prudence; "very 
well sir, then; supposing I should, 
steal a horse " 

"Ah, yes, yes," said the judge, that 
is a very different thing, very differ- 
ent, Mr. X. Proceed sir." 



February twentieth is the day set 
apart by Manager Barker for the 
formal opening of the newest of this 
city's exclusive hostelries. The 
Plaza, formerly known as the Un- 
ion Square Hotel, takes its place 
with the Palace and Fairmont and 
other high-class hostelries. In point 
of furnishings and decorations it 
is second to none. 

The manager, John G. Barker, is 
one of the best known me in 
San Francisco. He has been active- 
ly engaged in business enterprises 
other than the management of ho- 
tels, and has been identified with 
some of the most important of San 
Francisco's civic improvements. As 
a hotel man, Mr. Barker needs no 
introduction. His connection with 
the old Union Square hotel was the 
major reason for the steady success 
of that house. His personality and 
the high order of service rendered 
were the foundation stones upon 
which its popularity rested, and 
there is every reason to believe that 
the new Plaza will duplicate this 
remarkable success. 




Plaza Hotel to Open 

On the same day that the Pana- 
ma-Pacific Exposition will be 
thrown open to the world, the new 
Plaza Hotel will receive its intro- 
duction to San Francisco society. 



A SKIN OF BEAUTY IS A JOT 
FOKEVEE 

DR. T. FELIX GOURAUD'S 

ORIENTAL CREAM 

Or Magical Beautrfler 

Remove* Tan, Pim- 

Plea, Freckles Moth- 
'atches, Rash and 
Skin Diseases, and 
every blemish on 
beauty and dene* 
detection, llhaiitood 
the tett of 65 yean 
no other hai, and ii 
so harmleu we taste 
it to be lure it ii prop- 
perlymade. Accept 
no counterfeitol simi- 
lar name. The du- 
inguished Dr. L . A.Sayres said to a lady of the haut- 
on (a patient): "Ai you ladies will use them, I recom- 
mend Gouraud's Cream as the least harmful of all the 
Skii> preparations." 




For Sale by All Druggists and Fancy 
Goods Dealers. 

GOURAUD'S ORIENTAL TOILET 
POWDER 

For Infanta and adults. Exquisitely 
perfumed. Relieves Skin Irritations, cures 
Sunburn and renders an excellent complex 
ion. Price, 25 cents, by mail. 

GOURAUD'S POUDRE SUBTILE 

Removes Superfluous Hair. Prlca $1, by 

Mail. 

FERD. T. HOPKINS, Prop., 87 breat 

Jones St., Nsw York City. 



THE 



Ampico Player Piano 
$ 1035 

Monthly Payments if Desired 
There can be but one best of any- 
thing — unquestionably the best in 
pianos is the world-famed Knabe. 

If you wish to regard only quality, 
then we present to you the Knabe 
"Ampico" Player Piano. The 

"Ampico" Player combines the ut- 
most ease of pedaling and every re- 
finement of expression devices, in- 
cluding the marvelous Flexotone. The 
Knabe "Ampico" is especially con- 
structed for those who want the ab- 
solute best regardless of price. 

Your present Piano accepted as 
part payment. 



26 O'Farrell Street 

Oakland Store 473 12th Street 

Bacon Block 






Saturday, January 23, 1!)U 



T1IK WASP 



THE TATTLI 



n[ the thousand and one snob- 
beries which one encounters from 
time to time, one which happened 
tin 1 other day jmts them all in the 
shadow. If I had not heard it my- 
m-K 1 would not have believed it. 
A number of women were discussing 
the season -Exposition tickets, which 
entitle the buyer to admission the 
entire 2S8 days at the meagre price 
of $10, and which means that each 
entrance costs less than four cents, 
One of the women remarked that 
>lie had bought five of them, as 
there were four in her family and 
they would have guests on and off 
throughout the Fair. 

Several of the others had also tak- 
en the opportunity of minimizing 
their expenses during the Exposi- 
tion by the same method. But one 
of them, who is known to belong 
to the genus "Climber", with abso- 
lute ignorance of the criticism 
which she was creating, ex- 
claimed "Indeed I would not huy 
a season ticket. They are only for 
chauffeurs and maids. I prefer to 
pay my way every time I go." 

If her thought had been prompt- 
ed in a spirit of loyalty and generos- 
ity to the cause, in a desire to con- 
tribute towards its success, there 
would have been cause for it. But 
surely as it was expressed she is 
entitled to the honor of being en- 
throned as Queen of the Snobs for 
all time to come. 

Since chic little Josephine Parrott 
went east two weeks ago there has 
been much speculation as to wheth- 
er she journeyed to procure a trous- 
seau or simply as a panacea for 
wounded affections. The atten- 
tions of a young foreign nobleman 
in her direction have been most 
noticeable ever since he came to 
town a year ago. The Parrotts as 
a family have a predilection for 
titles, five of the family having mar- 
ried into the foreign nobility. How- 
ever, up to the present they all have 
linked their lives either with Eng- 
lish or French aristocracy. But this 
man happens to be a German. Mrs. 
Abby Parrott, Miss Josephine Par- 
rott's grandmother, who is the dom- 
inent factor in the clan, is said to 
have frowned on the engagement 
from the beginning, although there 
seems no fit reason for it except that 
the Count is not burdened with a 
large share of the world's goods. 



N.Warshauer F.Warshauer 



Warshauer Brothers 

TAILORS 



49 Geary Street 

SAN FRANCISCO 



But he is most presentable from a 
society point of view and u good 
Catholic, which Is a requirement 
of all those win. aspire to the Par- 
rot hand. The young lady herself 
has smiled most delightedly upon 

lii- attentions and they saw a great 
deal of each other. There may be 
another reason for her Eastern trip. 
The Count has been endeavoring to 
get bach to Germany so that he 
might lay his patriotism at the 
Kaiser's feet, but as there is no way 
of getting there except through 
Britain or France, he has stayed 
here rather than be made prisoner 
of war in either country. He has 
talked of going to New York and 
biding his chance to get across 
All the young people in their very 
exclusive little set have been won- 
dering as to the outcome of their 
fascination for each other and the 
family objections have been an op- 
en secret. 

# * * * 

In one of the dailies the other 
morning there was a telegraphic 
item from New York in which it 
gave a purported interview with 
Mrs. Thurman Alden be Bolt (Eliz- 
ebeth Rowan) who has sued her 
husband for divorce. In it she was 
said to have made a remark that 
the divorce was as much of a su- 
prise to her as it was to her friends. 
In the face of the fact that she has 
brought the suit herself this seems 
very strange. When Mrs. de Bolt 
was out here last summer she told 
all of her friends that she intended 
to bring the suit as her marital un- 
happiness was a well established 
fact in the mind of everybody. The 
de Bolts have been separated for 
over two years, most of that time 
having been passed by Mrs. de Bolt 
in Paris and London. 

When Elizabeth Rowan ran away 
and married Thurman de Bolt she 
was just eighteen and had come 
into a fortune of several hundred 
thousand dollars, an inheritance 
Her husband had just graduated 
from Stanford University and had 
not then established in the 
way of wage earning. The op- 
position made to the match by her 
father, Major Rowan of the Cuban 
war fame, was not any personal 
dislike for the young man but be- 
cause he thought his daughter was 
too young to know her own mind, 
and because he felt that a good 
husband should at least be self-sup- 
porting. If what Mrs. de Bolt said 
when she was in San Francisco was 
true, her father was a prophet, for 
she claimed that she had not only 
supported herself but that she had 
also helped to keep de Bolt's nose 
from the grindstone the entire time 
of their association. She is an int- 
of their association. She is an in- 
teresting and intensely clever little 
body, whose conversation is epi- 
grammic. She dresses in a very 
striking manner expressive of an 
originality just as striking. One 
day at the Palace Hotel she startled 



the luncheon contingent by appear- 
ing in an emerald green tailor suit 
with a hat of the Bame color topped 

by a bright red parrot There are 
several of our eligible bachelors who 

are hoping that sin. will change her 
mind and come back to California 
before returning to Paris. 
# * # * 

I. ulf as a pastime for the women 
ii! the smart set has long since re- 
solved itself from a fad into an es- 
tablished order of things. That it 
has come to stay there is no doubt 
in the minds of those who frequent 
the various country clubs about 
the bay. There is not a day that 
the links are not dottde with belles 
and matrons swaggering in outing 
togs. What this means to the pro- 
letariat was well defined the other 
day when several of them out for 
a ride in a jitney bus drove through 
a Presidio links. It was pouring 
in torrents and yet there were sev- 
eral women on the greens. One of 
the wags poked his head from be- 
hind the tarpaulins and called to 
his friends inside, "Nobody at home 
out there." Nothing daunted the 
women laughed and went on with 
their match. 



The card party which is to take 
place Friday afternoon, January 
29th, in the rose room of the St. 
Francis Hotel, is the third of a ser- 
ies of card parties which the Lad- 
ies Auxiliary of the Mary's Help 
Free Clinic are giving to assist in 
raising funds for this worthy in- 
stitution. This affair was to have 
taken place on January 10th but 
was postponed on account of the 
death of Archbishop Riordan, and 
therefore will be the last of the 
series to be given before the Lenten 
season. A dansant is scheduled 
for the Saturday after Easter, April 
10th. at the St Francis Hotel, both 
the colonial ballroom and the rose 
room having been secured for this 
occasion. Mrs. E. F. Conlon will be 
chairman of the reception commit- 
tee for Friday afternoon's affair. 



Dansant at Palace 

Representative women from the 
various organizations of San Fran- 
cisco hope to make the Dansant at 
the Palace Hotel, Saturday after- 
noon, Feb. 6, from four to seven 
o'clock, one of the greatest successes 
of the season. The funds will be 
devoted to bringing the Child lab- 
or Convention and Exhibit to this 
city during the Exposition. It will 
be necessary to raise $2,000, one-half 
of the sum required for such a con- 
vention, which brings with it Jane 
Adams, Dr. Felix Adler, Dr. Anna 
Strong, and other authorities. A 
striking poster by Miss Mildred 
Levy, depicting a little boy and girl 
appealing for help, which will be 
used to announce the dansant. The 
floor managers will be William 
Lange, Robert Eyre, and Edward 
Greenway. Many other prominent 
men in society will assist. 

Table reservations may now be 
made at the Palace Hotel. 



11 



IMPORTANT NOTICE 
The editorial and business offices 
of The Wasp have been moved ro 
The Bankers Investment Building, 
49 Seary street. The telephone num- 
ber has been changed to Douglas 
1871. 



Glasses absolutely necessary. 
Demand rapidly Increasing*. 

The demand for proper glasses is In- 
creasing every year tor two reasons: 
first, — more work is demanded of the 
eyes than formerly — Second, people now 
realize that they are better fitted for 
their duties if they have good eyesight 

This is particularly line of people who 
require two pairs of classes — one for 
reading and one for distance. With the 
recent invention of the wonderful "One- 
piece" Bifocal two pairs of glases are 
not required as reading and distance cor- 
reclions are pround in one glass — yet 
there is no noticeable dividing line be- 
tween the two portions. 

W. D. Fennimore 1 I I / ; A. R. Fennimore 




181 Post Street ) c c 

2508 Mission St. f San Franc,sco 

1221 Broadway, Oakland 




ILTMO 




NEW YORK \ 

America's Latest and 
| Most Refined and New \ 
! York's Centermost Hotel 

Only hotel occupying an en tire city 

block, Vanderblltand MadisonAvs., 

43d and 44th Sts., adjoining Grand 

Central Terminal 

[ 1000 rooms; 9.".0 with bath — Room rate 
i from $2.n0 per day. Suites from 2 
to 15 rooms for permanent occu- 
pancy. Large and small bull, bnti- 
v i]uct and dinjng salons and suite 
specially arrunRcil for publh 
or private functions 
Custav Baumann, Pres 
.John McE. Bowman 
Vice-Pres 




I 

,§ Phone Douglas 5370 

I M. E. GALLAGHER 

o Fancy, Street, Reception and Evening 

I GOWNS 

f j* & a* 

<| WEDDING TROUSSEAUX 

S 95-97 WMttell Bldg., 166 Geary St. 
ft San Francisco. 



The "Fi 



le Trances" 

I HAIRDRESSING AND 

f MANICURING PARLORS. 

I 110 GEARY STREET. 

£ Purchased and Now Conducted by 

1 tyrs. f. Williams 

is Formerly Manager Hair Diessing $ 
% Dept., The Emporium. *, 



12 



THE WAS? 



Saturday, January 23, 1914 



SAN FRANCISCO FIRST 

Federal Reserve bank of San 
Francisco was the first bank to 
have its discount rate approved un- 
der 4 1-2 per cent. 

Since the outbreak of the war in 
Europe the government has ship- 
ped nearly 200 tons of gold, worth 
about $99,000,000 dollars from Phila- 
delphia to New York, by parcel 
post. 

Reports brought by skilled ob- 
servers who have been visiting cot- 
ton-growing regions of the South 
say there is as yet very littl 3 indi- 
cation of a limitation of acreage for 
the coming season. 

Recent advances in price of cot- 
ton has had stimulating effect on 
collection of outstanding accounts. 
Bankers estimate that fully 50 per 
cent <of indebtedness arising from 
crop committments has been cleared 
off. 

An exporter of wheat says that 
sales abroad continue to average 
1,000,000 bushels a day, and he looks 
for $1.60 or $1.70 before the end of 
the season. There is some danger 
bread may be advanced from 5 to 
6 cents per loaf. 

Shipments of worsted yarns from 
England to United States in 1914 
were 1,965,000 pounds, compared 
with 73,000 pounds in 1913. In 1914, 
8,219,000 yards of woolens were ship- 
ped, compared with 2,190,000 in the 
preceding year, and 32,790,000 yards 
of worsteds compared with 9,218,000 
in 1913. Increase was due to lower 
United States tariff. 

J. Ogden Armour sounds a warn- 
ing that an increase in the cost of 
beef may be looked for in the near 
future. 

* * * * 

Rubber Trade Begins 

Cable despatches from London, 
received yesterday gave assurances 
to the rubber industry in this coun- 
try that if the present progress con- 
tinues shipments of crude rubber 
to the United States will begin in 
about two weeks. 

This means that, within a month 
or six weeks, the factories of the 
country, with their 250,000 employes, 
whose jobs were jeopardized by the 
English embargo, will find them- 
selves drawing wages again. Akron, 




SoriE ARE BORN TO GREATNESS: SOME --ETC. 

THE MONEY MAKERS 

(By X-WALL) 



Ohio, with its great plants, and 
other rubber manufacturing cities 
will see the end of their present de- 
pression. 

Members of the Rubber Club of 
America and of the Rubber Trade 
Club of New York are determined 
that nothing shall occur which 
might lead England to replace the 
embargo. They know that some 
dealers and many speculators have 
come into the trade recently lured 
by the large profits from shipping 
rubber to countries which England 
does not want to receive such sup- 
plies. They know that rubber has 
been shipped out of the country, 
from various ports as gum, which 
is not contraband, and under var- 
ious other names on false mani- 
fests. 

The legitimate trade has resolved 
to prevent such practices. To that 
end a committee of manufacturers 
has been appointed, which has tola 
the Treasury Department that it 
will organize a service to prevent 
false manifests being used. It will 
establish a secret service or it will 
institute a clearing house in every 
port to guard against trading un- 
der false pretenses or without au- 
thority. 

* * * * 

People's Water Company 

The continuous development of 
the principles of Equity, fair-deal- 
ing and honesty— plus the element 
of confidence — is accentuated by the 



THE ANGLO & LONDON PARIS 
NATIONAL BANK 



SAN FRANCISCO 



Capital $ 4,000,000 

Surplus and Profits. 1,600,000 
Total Resources.... 40,000,000 



krT^ 



rrtf-T 



OFFICERS: 

Herbert Fleischhacker President 

' Sig. Greenebaum. .Chairman of Board 
j Washington Dodge. . . Vice-President 

; J. Priedlander Vice-President 

C. F. Hunt Vice-President 

E. Altschul Cashier 

/ C. E. Parker Assistant Cashier 

Wm. H. High Assistant Cashier 

H. Choynski Assistant Cashier 

G. E. Burdick Assistant Cashier 

G. P. Herr. .. .Assistant. Cashier 
A. L. Langerman Secretary 



vigorous agitation of Rudolph 
Spreckels in the interests of the 
holders of the underlying bonds 
of the People's Water Company. 

* # # * 

The unification of advantages to 
such bond-holders through Mr. 
Spreckels' gaining ascendency over 
the John S. Drum faction (called 
the reorganization committee), and 
the appointment of the Rudolph 
Spreckels committee of seven, will, 
not unnaturally, release these in- 
vestors from the relentless severity 
of a possible inequitable adjust- 
ment of the Company's finances. 

* # # * 

An illusion, not uncommon in 
self-constituted reorganizations, is 
that the minority — or small holder 
of equities — can be forced into 
abandoning his interests to finan- 
cial or numerical superiority. 

This latter is what might be char- 
acterized as "organized" rapacity. 

* * * * 

Mr. Charles H. Marshall, who was 
brutally assaulted by R. E. Mul- 
cahy, manager for E. F. Hutton & 
Co., is still confined to his home. 

Owing to Mr. Marshall's injuries 
he was unable to appear in court 
against Mulcahy last Friday. Judge 
Oppenheim granted a continuance 
until January twenty-second, on 
which day he will set the case for 
trial. 



Through a Lorgnette 
- "My brother and I are the only 
gentlemen born who have danced 
professionally in San Francisco," 
boasts a young upstart whose ar- 
rugence and snobbishness have 
won him plenty of enemies. A wo- 
man standing near, putting up her 
lorgnette and looking him over 
from his shiny shoes to the crown 
of his sleek head, commented: "Ah! 
gentlemen born are they? Dear me, 
what a pity they could not have 
stayed gentlemen!" 



Perhaps the most beautiful Ori- 
ental bazaar in all the West is that 
of Sing Chong Company on Grant 
Avenue and California Street, San 
Francisco Chinatown. Everything 
Oriental in the way of presents can 
be found there. The visitor who 
leaves San Francisco without seeing 
this great emporium misses one of 
the sights of the city. 



High 

Grade 

Municipals 

Free from the expense and annoy- 
ance of the Federal 
Income Tax 

Byrne & 
McDonnell 



NEW YORK, NEWARK, 
SAN FRANCISCO 



Merchants Exhange Bldg. 
San Francisco, California 



The German Savings 
and Loan Society 

(THE GERMAN BANK) 
Savings Commercial 

Incorporated 1868 
626 California Street San Francisco 

Cal. 

Member of the Associated Savings 

Banks of San Francisco. 

The following Branches for Receipt 
and Payment of Deposits only: 
Mission Branch, S. E. corner Mission 

and 21st Streets. 
Richmond District Branch, S. W. cor- 
ner Clement and 7th Ave. 
Haight Street Branch, S. W. corner 
Haight and Belvedere. 

June 30th, 1914: 

Assets $58,656,635.13 

Capital actually paid up 

in Cash 1,000,000.00 

Reserve and Contingent 

Funds 1,857,717.65 

Employees' Pension 

Fund 177,868.71 

Number of Depositors 66,367 

Office hours : 10 o'clock A. M. to 
3 o'clock P. M., except Saturdays to 
12 o'clock M. and Saturday evenings 
from 6 o'clock P. M. to 8 o'clock P. 
M. for receipt of deposits only. 

For the 6 months ending June 
30th, 1914, a dividend to depositors 
of 4 per cent per annum was de- 
clared. 



Wells Fargo Nevada 
National Bank 

Of San Franciaco 

Nevada Bank Building, 2 Montgomery St., 
N. E. Corner of Market St. 

Capital Paid Up $6,000,000.00 

Surplus & Undivided Profits 5,148,628.93 



Total $11,148,628.93 

OFFICERS. 

Isaias W. Hellman, President 
I. W. Hellman, Jr., Vice-Pres. 
F L. Lipman, Vice-Pres 
James K Wilson, Vice-Pres, 
Frank B. King, Cashier. 
C. L. Jacobs, Assistant Cashier 
W. McGavin, Assistant Cashier 
C. L. Davis, Assistant Cashier 
A. D. Oliver, Assistant Cashier 
A. B. Price, Assistant Cashier 
DIRECTORS. 
Isaias W. Hellman I. W. Hellman, Jr. 
Joseph SIoss A. Christeson 

Percy T Morgan Wm. Haas 

F. W. Van Sicklen Hartland Law 
Wm F. Herrin Henry Rosenfeld 

John C. Kirkpatrick James L. Flood 
J. Henry Meyer Chas. J. Deering 

A. H Payson James K Wilson 

F L. Lipman 

ACCOUNTS INVITED 

Prompt Service, Courteous Attention, Un- 
excelled Facilities. 
SATE DEPOSIT VAULTS 



.Saturday, January 23, 1914 



THE WASP 



SPORTSMAN'S NOTEBOOK 



man In' was 
initted it. 



never small be ail- 



By the Fancier 



He 



Deuced Doggie 
who said: "The more I 



see 

of men the more I like dogs," was 
obviously a pessimist, and. there- 
fore, sbOUld not be quoted in such 
■ would-be cheery spot as a sports 
column. If he had made it: "The 
more I see of dogs the more I love 
them," he would have immortalized 
bimself as a good-hearted sports- 
man for all time. Also, it is certain 
he would have been happy in Cali- 
fornia. 

From the time when the first for- 
ty-niner, with his shaggy sheep- 
bound of uncertain ancestry but 
undoubted trustfulness and worth, 
hit the gold-seekers' trail until now, 
when plutocratic kennels are popu- 
lated with the canine aristocracy of 
America, the dog has played a 
prominent part in the history of 
the State. 

In fact, California has always 
been "deuced doggie," as they have 
it on Pall Mall. 

* * * * 
A City Financier 

The big thrill of the moment is 
the coming world's Dog Show, ar- 
ranged for the fall. Most of the 
best dogs in the country will be 
here, and several of the famous 
prize winners of Europe. It is, of 
course, a chestnut to fanciers, but 
it is remarkable what few people, 
even among dog owners, know that 
the finest collection of collies in the 
world belong to William Ellery of 
San Francisco. It is almost impos- 
sible to read an authoritative paper 
on dogs printed in New York, Lon- 
don or Paris unless there is some 
reference to these kennels, which 
contain Southport Student, Enfield 
Model, and the best strain of blood 
of this noble race of dogs in exist- 




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SOCIETY'S NEWEST 

Au is to let the readers of ike Wasp 
know about society's newest member— 

SAungyros'SPECIAL 
BRUSH-END Cigarettes 

Ultra-individual, and rather expensive . 
A/lade entirely by hand and separately 
wrapped in silver hid to preserve fresh- 
ness and flavor. J\t clubs and 
the better stands - '25c. 



ence today. According to enthu- 
siastic connolseurs of these things. 
Mr, Ellery's name will live forever 
In dog history, because he lias ere 
ated a new type. 

All the great collies alive today- 
are related to his dogs and it is 
safe to say that the prize winners 
of the future will include four-foot- 
ed princes ,,f the San Francisco 
kennels in their pedigree. 
* # * # 

J. P. Morgan a Rival 
Ellery began as an amateur, but 
such was his eye [or a collie and his 
great application to the study of 
type and pedigree that he succeed- 
ed in getting together probably the 
greatest and strongest breeding 
kennel of collies on earth, and such 
was his success that he quickly be- 
gan to produce champion after 
champion. 

The San Franciscan once had 
John Pierpont Morgan as a rival 
in the collie world. The giant of 
finance plunged into his new hob- 
by with all his characteristic force 
and lavishness; nothing was too 
expensive, no one uninteresting who 
could tell him something about col- 
lies. He must be the monarch of 
the collie world. But the cpjiet 
methodical Californian, armed with 
less money but a life time's experi- 
ence that no purse could purchase, 
won the duel, and Ellery is now 
recognized as one of the kings of 
the American collie arena, a posi- 
tion the late Mr. Morgan was never 
able to attain, and like a sports- 



Improving the Pony 
Talking of the improvement of 
animal breeds, K. W. Howard, who 
died this week as the result of the 
tragic elevator accident, has done 
much to "uplift" the California 
pony. Like Ellery, Howard was in- 
spired by an ideal and aimed con- 
stantly at it through success and 
failure. He combined the little 
thoroughbred, small and nifty, with 
the large cow pony of this state, 
and gradually evolved a type for 
which the crack players of two na- 
tions eagerly compete. 

The ordinary pony of California 
has merits of its own. For instance, 
the thorough training that the 
Spaniards gave their chargers has 
been bequeathed to their ancestry, 
of which the cow ponies arc humble 



13 



Instances, a docility to the rider 
that is useful amidst the hum and 
drive Ol ;i big polo game. 



The Duke of Westminster paid 
$3000 for one of the new types, and 
there were something like a dozen 
in the last great clash between Un- 
cle Sam and John Bull at Meadow- 
brook. 



Howard was not only active in 
the breeding phase of polo. As a 
player and organizer of tourna- 
ments he has been prominent in 
the story of the game down the 
Peninsula. A shadow has been cast 
by his loss. His organizing brain, 
good sportsmanship, cheery laugh 
and voice will be long missed in 
the places where horsemen and polo 
folk foregather. 




Tom Driscoll's Famous Gray 




For Health, Strength 

Damiana Bitters 

Naber. Alfa & Brune, Agents. 

S36 HOWARD STREET 

Opposite New Montgomery Street 



WANTED ! 

Diamonds Pearls 

HIGHEST CASH VALUE PAH) 

PAWN TICKETS' BOUGHT 
Phil. Schuman, Whitney Bldg., 133 

Geary Street, Boom 524. 
Tel. Douglas 4125. 



Enfield Model, the Most Valuable Collie in the World Today, 
Belonging to William Ellery 



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Telephones 

Douglas 3266 
Douglas 3267 




French Confectioner/ 



Ice cream to 
order. Wedding 
cakes and 
cream cakes a 
specialty. 




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San Francisco, California 



Phone Douglas 4393 



MME. H. E. EURDELL, Corsetleie. 

THE CORSET SHOP 

EXCLUSIVE AGENTS 

BEIN JOLIE, LA PEINOESSE and 
HENDERSON COESETS. 



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14 



THE WASP 



Saturday, January 23, 1914 




The Embarrased One 



[ECHAU : TAVERN. 

Cor. Eddy and Powell Sts. 
Phone Douglas 4700 

A HIGH-CLASS 
FAMILY CAFE 

Where patrons are constantly surrounded 

by an air of refinement and respectability 

Informal Dansant Every Evening 1 at 

Nine Except Sunday 

Under the management of 

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Odeon Cafe 

Market and Eddy Sts. 

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I Vaudeville Evening — 

Concert Afternoons 

A. BECKER, President 
A. J. BECKER, Manager 



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OLD 

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Hotel Co. 

and 

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Music and Entertainment Every Evening 

415 - 421 BUSH STREET 

(Above Kearny) 

&AN FRANCISCO, CAL. 

Exchange Douglas 2411 



FEDERAL CLUB 

32 TUKK STREET 

San Francisco's Popular Rendezvous 

for Sportsmen 



Dance Hall 



Buffet 



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LORING SEEMS LOST 
Loring Pickering looks somewhat 
out of place in the prosaic quarters 
of the circulation department of the 
Bulletin. Loring came to the Bul- 
letin fresh from Europe, where life 
was leisure and tinged with poetry. 
It is said "by one who knew him 
there that he was quite a fellow. The 
London fogs are really full of color, 
and, then, there is Prance, where 
woman is a temptation, and Italy 
where the roses grow so red. A few 
Italian moons we have been lost un- 
der ourselves. And Loring hadn't 
grown his first mustache then, in- 
deed, he has not quite grown one 
yet. But, we have only to say it is 
our opinion that the Bulletin 
should provide a department for 
Loring which would be more in 
keeping with his European environ- 
ment. It is a shame to shut away in 
a matchbox a man who has ever 

tasted of an Italian moon. 

* * * * 

Francis McCullough, a well-known 
war correspondent for American 
and English papers, has joined the 
British Army and received a com- 
mission as First Lieutenant in the 
Worcestershire Regiment. 

* * * * 

An Angel Drugged 
Donald Lowrie, that wonderful 
young man model and portege of 
the Bulletin, was arrested in New 
York recently on a charge of intoxi- 
cation. It seems that he has been 
employed as a sort of secretary at 
Sing Sing. He went back there aft- 
er putting in a claim of having 
been drugged. The drug in ques- 
tion is probably too much not- 
oriety. In San Francisco when a 
well known sculptor quarrelled 
with his wfie, it came to light that 
Lowrie and she had been intimate 
enough to exchange love letters, 
which permitted one to guess any- 
thing one might. Of course the 
world did guess and the sculptor 
and the woman said goodbye. The 
particular drug in that instance 
Donald did not define. Undoubt- 
edly it must have been a very pleas- 
ant one. Intoxication is rather a 
joy at times, too. Why any man 
should deny a happy outing of this 
kind, or a clandestine affair with 
a pretty woman, is more than such 
a moralist as the writer can under- 
stand. 

* # * -X- 

The many polo enthusiasts of 
San Francisco are delighted 
over the promise of Charles 
Cary Rumsey to attend the 
exposition polo meet with the Coop- 
erstown players of New York. His 
ponies are already on their way to 
Southern California, where prelim- 
ary games will be played at River- 
side and Coronado. Mrs. Rumsey 



will accompany her husband to the 
coast and will be the motif for 
much entertaining by the Dupees 
and other of the polo set at Coro- 
nado, and by all the Peninsular 
set when they visit San Francisco. 



Irellll 



iiinniiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii.. 



An agricultural expert who had 
been invited to address a meeting 
expressed opinions with which a lo- 
cal farmer, a plain, uncultured man, 
found fault. After some discussion, 
in which the sense of the meeting 
was clearly with the farmer, the ex- 
pert lost his temper. 

"Sir," he said to his opponent, 
striving to speak coolly, " do you re- 
alize that I have been at two uni- 
versities, one in this country and 
one in Germany?" 

"What of that?" demanded the 
smile. "I had a calf that was nursed 
by two cows, and the observation I 
made was the more he was nursed 
the greater calf he grew." 



Cafe Notes 
Preparations are being made for 
a number of gay supper parties 
which are to take place at the 
Odeon Cafe on Wednesday night, 
January 27, following the celebra- 
tion in the German House of Kaiser 
Wilhelm's birthday. A number of 
tables have been reserved and it is 
expected that the festivities will be 
most merry. 

The Portola-Louvre was the scene 
of several supper parties last Satur- 
day night, following the fall of the 
Young Men's Hebrew Association at 
the St. Francis. 

Techau Tavern also was the meet- 
ing place for many of the dancers 
and a number of suppers took place 
there. 

* * * * 

Last Wednesday evening Techau 
Tavern was bubbling over with an 
enthusiasm which can only be com- 
pared to the spirit which is so fa- 
miliar to San Franciscans on the 
New Year's Eve. The new maple 
dance floor in the center of the ain 
cafe was used for the first time and 
the occasion was one that seemed 
to call forth the genuine carnival 
spirit, which the management en- 
couraged by furnishing fun-making 
souvenirs for all. 

The new floor was pronounced 
perfect by the many dancers and 
the lofty ceiling of the cafe, which 
is twenty-five feet in the clear, pro- 
vided unsurpassable ventilation. 

Mr. Robert Carville and Miss La 
Marr, late dancing stars of the mus- 
ical comedy success, "The Tango 
Tea," whom the management have 
secured for arotracted engagement 
were warmly received, and their ex- 
hibition of the most modern ball- 
room dances was the great attrac- 
tion of the evening. 

These refined and expert dancers 
will be present at the Tavern every 
afternoon between four and five 
every evening from eight to eleven- 
thirty, when they will not only give 
exhibition dances, but will, for the 
purpose of teaching without charge, 
dance with those ladies and gentle- 
men who so desire. .__.__ 




= The Mark of the Candy of Character = 



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A COFFEE CONFECTION I 



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HOTEL AND RESTAURANT 
64 - 66 Ellis Street 



Our Cooking Will Meet Tonr Taste. Our 
Prices Will Please You. 



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WILL REMAIN AT CORNER 

POLK and POST 

SAN FRANCISCO 
Telephones: Franklin 2960; Home 6706 



Pearl Oyster House 

Phone Dousks 4788 

FISH AND SHELLFISH 

In All It. Varieties 

Pine-St. Entrance, California Market 



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Saturday, January 23, 1914 

Edgar Allan Poe Revealed 
One of tlic many interesting let- 
ters in the sale of the literary prop- 
erties of the late Adrian H. Joline, 
is the original draft of a letter to 
Prof. Charles Anthon, all in the 
handwriting of Edgar Allan Poe, 
showing his methods of construct- 
ing an important letter, with its 
many ohanges of words, phrases 
and even paragraphs. In this lit 
ter Poe writes: 

"Before quitting the Messenger I 
saw. or fancied I saw, through a 
long and dim vista the brilliant 
field for ambition which a maga- 
zine of bold and noble aims pre- 
sented to him who should success- 
fully establish it in America. I per- 
ceived that the country, from its 
very constitution, could not fail of 
affording in a few years a larger 
proportionate amount of readers 
than any upon earth. I perceived 
that the whole energetic, busy spirit 
of the age tended wholly to maga- 
zine literature— to the curt, the 
terse; the well timed and the read- 
ily diffused, in preference to the old 
forms of verbose and ponderous 
and the inaccessible. 

"Holding steadily in view my ul- 
timate purpose— to found a maga- 
zine of my own or in which at 
least I might have a proprietary 
right— it has been my constant en- 
deavor in the meantime, not so 
much to establish a reputation 
great in itself as one of that par- 
ticular character which should best 
further my special objects, and 
draw attention to my exertions as 
editor of a magazine, bearing not 
only willingly but cheerfully sad 
poverty and the thousand conse- 
quent contumelies and other ills 
which the condition of the mere 
magazinist entails upon him in 
America, where, more than in any 
other region upon the fact of the 
globe, to be poor is to be despised. 
"Setting aside, for the present, my 
criticisms, poems and miscellanies 
(sufficiently numerous), my tales, 
a great number of which might be 
termed fantasy pieces, are in num- 
ber sixty-six. They wjould make 
perhaps five of the ordinary novel 
volumes. I have them prepared in 
every respect for the press; but, 
alas, I have no money, nor that in- 
fluence which would enable me to 
get a publisher— although I seek 
no pecuniary remuneration * * * 
I know that you have unbounded 
influence with the Harpers, and I 
know that if you would exert it in 
my behalf you could procure me 
the publication I desire." 



THE WASP 



15 



Maynard Dixon Wells tells this 

story of a local fellow artist. He had 

given the lasttouches to a purple 

canvas when his wife came into his 

i studio. 

"My dear," said he, "this is a 
landscape I wanted you to suggest 
a title for." 

"Why not call it 'Home'?" she 
said, after a long look. 

" 'Home'; Why?" 

"Because there's no place like it," 
she replied meekly. 




THINGS 
WE 
SHOULDN'T 
KNOW 



O 



THE REGULAR THING 
By Billee Glynn 
I met her on the street the other 
day. I knew her five years ago and 
then she was pretty. I can well re- 
member how softly her hair, like 
piled monnshine, encompassed her 
face, how the dimples played and 
her white teeth showed when she 
laughed, and her dawn-glinting 
eyes joyed up to Heaven. 

She had money enough and a 
mother bent on marrying again. 
She had a great many admirers and 
she accepted caressing. She was one 
of those who believed in making 
use of the moonlight, in tearing up 
the rose to find how its heart was 
planned. Her laugh was like the 
steel string of a violin with a flaw in 
it. Through many a joyride and 
soiree it sounded. Her hands per- 
mitted the pressure of scores. Her 
lips were prey not too difficult of 
capture. Her waist invited an arm 
gathering boldness from the occa- 
sions. She raced the days glibly 
and went in for everything. And 
she came out of it with a husband 
after a couple of years. 

He was fifty, at least, and had 
pursued her for twelve months. She 
fascinated him with her wildfire 
moods and he won her with dia- 
monds and a dowery. Her mother 
was delighted though she had not 
yet found a mate. Society gave 
them its customary blessing and 
the newspapers sighed their stereo- 
typed compliments. 

But have you ever noticed that 
age withers youth, that a girl mar- 
rying an old man marries a terrible 
influence. Even though he adores 
her she will dry up beside him. It 
is in the nature of things as rivers 
run downhill. Besides, the lady's 
training craved for artificial excite- 
ment. An old man may woo but 
he cannot keep. She said goodbye 
to him coldly in something less 
than two years and he went back 
to business with a sigh of satisfac- 
tion. She was too much trouble 
which is always the ease. Anyway 
he had none of the fires of youth for 
her. And free again, she has found 
that she does not possess them eith- 
er. Her experience, her palming 
male friends, and the old man sap- 
ped them completely and left her 
a husk. 

She is now twenty-five and quite 
worn out. She was only pret- 
ty and that is gone. She was never 
fascinating for she was only an ex- 
terior. Even the lines of her body 
seem to have lost poise. Her hair 
is like a blanket around dulled 



eyes. She is a little fat and con- 
siderably coarse. The brightness of 
her laugh has worn to brass. She 
is looking for love but she knows 
that love cannot come. It passed 
entirely with the pawned delicacies 
of her nature. For love does not 
come where his trysting ground has 
been despoiled. She does not know 
it but she must belong ever and al- 
ways to her old man and her com- 
mon flirtations. There is no science 
in the world which can reconstruct 
a rose. 



"What's the baby crying for 
now?" asked the head of the house 
from the depth of his paper. 

"He wants his own way," answer- 
ed the mother. 

And with his mind on the latest 
stock quotation Hubby replied:— 

"Well, if it's his, why don't you 
let him have it?" 

* * -X- tf 

She — You promised to love me for 
eternity. 

He — The few years we've been mar- 
ried have been longer that that! 
* * * # 

Dolly — She insisted on a grand 
ceremony when they were married. 

Molly— And then she left him 
without any! 




I Have Serv- $ 
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WHY NOT 
YOU? 
T. LUNDY, JEWELER 

X Efrtd. 1871. 718 Market St 



WONG SUN YUE TEA GARDEN 
535 Grant Avenue 

One of the biggest atractions of 
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Admission (including tea service) 25c 

Served in the original Chinese way. 
Of easy access for tourists and visitors. 



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16 



THE WASP 



Saturday, January 23, 1914 



ma&i 



'isslilSlimi 



QUINTET CLUB 

The final concert of the first sea- 
son by the San Francisco Quintet 
Club will be given at the St. Fran- 
cis Hotel, in the Colonial Ballroom 
this Sunday afternoon, January 24, 
at 2:30. 

This organization has proved to 
be the most interesting group of 
ensemble players ever formed in 
this city, and its work has been 
most excellent. The players seem to 
do their work as if they loved it, 
and Messrs. Hecht and Greenbaum 
feel very proud of the artistic suc- 
cess of the venture and promise 
that the good work will be resumed 
next season. 

The program for this Sunday's 
concert consists of three important 
works never before heard in this 
city. It is as follows: 

1 Quartet Op. 23 for Piano and 

Strings Dvorak 

2 Serenade for Piute, Violin and 

Viola Max Reger 

3 Quintet for Piano and String 

Dohnanyi 

Tickets may be secured at Sher- 
man, Clay & Co., Kohler and Chase, 
and, Sunday, at the St. Prancis 
newstand. Prices are 50 cents and 



ALMA GLUCK 

At last we are to have an oppor- 
tunity of hearing that famous 
singer, Alma Gluck. This young and 
beautiful artist, who has won world- 
wide fame before reaching her twen- 
ty-first year, and whose voice, art, 
and personal magnetism have made 
her one of the most beloved artists 
now before the public, will make 
her first appearance in the West at 
the Columbia Theater next Sunday 
afternoon, January 31, under the 
management of Will L. Greenbaum. 

In former years San Francisco 
used to get the singers after they 
had been before the public for 
many years and the glow and 
bloom of youth had departed from 
their voices, even though their art 
remained; but Mr. Greenbaum, for 
the past twelve years, has been 
bringing them to us in their very 
prime, and it has more than quad- 
rupled the interest in music among 
our people. Alma Gluck we are to 
hear in all the glory of her charm- 
ing youth, and in programs that 
will delight music lovers of all 
classes. 

At next Sunday's concert she will 
■sing many beautiful and varied 
works. We have space to mention 
only the "Air of Asteria, from the 
opera "II Telermaco" (Gluck), "Ri- 
dente la Calma" (Mozart), "0, Sleep, 
Why Dost Thou Leave He" (Han- 



del), "Die Forelle" (Schubert), "Dei- 
Sandman" (Schumann), "Bohemian 
Cradle Song" (Smetana), "Chanson 
Indoue" (Rimsky-Korsakow), "Al- 
lah" (Chadwick), "Little Grey Dove" 
(Saar), "From the Land of the Sky- 
Blue Water" (Cadman). 

The second concert will be given 
Sunday afternoon, February 7, with 
an entire change of program, the 
list containing a group of old class- 
ics, a group of French works by Pal- 
adhile, Ravel, Massenet and Char- 
pentier, a group of Slavic composers 
Rachmaninoff, Rimsky - Korsakow, 
Rubinstein and some Little Russia 
folk songs arranged by the violinist 
Zimbalist, and a group in English 
by MacDowell, Parker, Horsman, 
Worrill, and Cottonet, all of whom 
are Americans. The accompanist 
will be Wilhelm Spoor. 

The sale of seats will open at Sher- 
man, Clay & Co., Kohler & Chase, 
and the Columbia Theater next 
Wednesday morning, and mail or- 
ders should be addressed to Will 



L. Greenbaum at Sherman Clay & 
Co. 

Mme. Gluck will not appear in 
Oakland. 

Efrem Zimbalist 

Efrem Zimbalist, the young Rus- 
sian violin virtuoso, .Visited this 
city just four years ago, when but 
twenty years of age. In the interim, 
as was expected, his artistry has 
grown until today he ranks among 
the five greatest living masters of 
the violin. He possesses a style 
quite his own and has been called 
by the greatest critics, "the true 
poet of the violin." 

Manager Greenbaum announces 
that this master-artist will give his 
first recital here on Sunday after- 
noon, February 28. He will play 
programs of quite unhackneyed 
character, including some of the im- 
portant sonatas for violin and pi- 
ano with Sam Chotzinoff at the 
piano. 



ORPHEUM 

The Orpheum announces for next 
week another great new show which 
will have as it's headline attraction 
Ching Ling Foo, the World's Great- 
est Magician and his company of 
ten Celestials in their marvelous 
legerdemain performance. One of 
the most attractive features of the 
act is the singing of his seventeen 
year old daughter Chee Toy, who is 
probably the only Chinese prima 




donna in the world who sings 
American songs. 

Kate Elinore and Sam Williams 
will appear in their delightful cre- 
ation "The Hunter and the Hunter- 
ess", which may be briefly summed 
up as twenty minutes of laughs. 

The Schwartz Company, two for- 
eign pantomimists, will present 
their laugh provoking creation 
"The Broken Mirror." 

Jack E. Gardner in his new de- 
parture, "Curse You Jack Dalton" 
furnishes an enjoyable entertain- 
ment. 

The Danube Quartette, the Euro- 
pean easting marvels, are remark- 
able for the rapidity and the num- 
ber of new feats they successfully 
accomplish. 

Next week will be the last of Elsa 
Ruegger, the greatest of all female 



Alcazar 



PHONE KEARNY 2 
Matinee b Thursday and Saturdays 

Alessandro Bevani 
Opera Company 

Friday night. Carmen, Sat. Matinee, 
II Trovatore, Sat. night, Aida, Sun. 
night, Barber of Seville. 

WEEK OF JAN. 25— Mon. Night, 
Thurs. Mat. — "Faust." Tues. — "Otello." 
Wed. and Fri. — "Gioconda." Thurs. — 
"II Trovatore." Sat. Mat. — "Barber of. 
Seville." Sat. Night — "Aida." Sun. 
Night — "Carmen." 

PRICES NIGHTS — 50e, $1., $1.50, $2.00 
MATINEES— 50c and 51.00 



CQB£ 



LEADING 

THEATRE 



ELUi and Market 
Phone Sutter 2460 



2nd and Last "Week Starting 1 Sun. Night 

Matinees Wednesday and Saturday 

The Vivid, Vital Play of New York 

Life 

"TODAY" 

By George Broadhurst and Abraham 

Schomer With "The Perfect Cast" 

Headed by 

ARTKUK BYBOH 

Nights and Saturday Matinee Prices, 50c 

to 51.50. Best seats $1.00 at Wednesday 

matinee. 



NEXT — Com. Sun., Jan. 31 — "PEG O' 
MTT HEAR.T," with Peggy O'Neil 

O'FMWfcU. »«.STOCWOH &-POVrt\A. 

Safest and Most Magnificent Theatre In 
America. 



Week Beginning this Sunday afternoon 

tJUuuuee Kvery Day.) 



Alma Gluck, who sings at Columbia Theater, Jan. 31st and Feb. 7th 



ANOTHER GREAT NEW SHOW 

CHING LING FOO, the World's Fam- 
ous Magician and His Company of 10 
Celestials; KATE ELINORE & SAM 
WILLIAMS in "The Hunter and the 
Hunter-ess". "The Broken Mirror," pre- 
sented by THE SCHWARTZ CO. JACK 
E. GARDNER in the Travesty "Curse 
You Jack Dalton" . DANUBE QUAR- 
TETTE Europe's Casting Marvels. ELSA 
RUEGGER, World's Greatest Woman 
Cellist assisted by the Celebrated Con- 
ductor Edmund Lichtenstein. ANNA 
CHANDLER. Last week ALICE EIS & 
BERT FRENCH in "The Dance of the 
Temptress." 

Evening- Prices 10c, 25c, 50c, 75c. 

Matinee Prices (except Sundays and 

Holidays) 10c, 25c, 50c. 

PHONE DOUGLAS 70 



Saturday, January 23, 191 1 



THE WASP 



17 



cellists; Anna Chandler, who is 
making a tremendous iiit with her 
Judicious songs, and Alice Kis and 
pert French in their terpslchorean 
sensation, "The Dance of the Temp- 
tress." 

» * * » 

Michelena at Tivoli 
Beatrlz Michelena, the beautiful 
and vivacious California prima don- 
na, will be shown as "Mignon" in 
the photo-play, based on the grand 
opera, next week at the Tivoli Op- 
era House. 

.Miss Michelena used to sing the 
title role in grand opera. There is 
a great difference between the oper- 
atic stage and the "movies", where 
the voice of a songbird is necessarily 
mute, but .Miss .Michelena bridged 
(he chasm with that extraordinary 
versatility which is one of her chief 
claims to fame. She is just as won- 
derful a motion picture actress as 
she is a singer. And that is saying 
a great deal for the daughter of 
Fernando Michelena, the old Tivoli's 
most famous tenor, has per- 
petuated the achievements of the 
family through her own thrilling 
soprano. 

The California Motion Picture 
Corporation, in producing Mignon, 
determined to produce a film which 
would set a new standard in the 
photo world. No expense was spar- 
ed. In fact, it is stated that the 
film represents the expenditure of 
over $100,000, placing it in the first 
rank of expensive motion pictures. 
Miss Michelena was secured with 
a contract as leading lady which 
makes her one of the most high- 
priced motion picture actresses in 
the country. House Peters was her 
leading man. The supporting com- 
pany included such well known and 
finished artists as Andrew Robson 
and Clara Beyers. 

Charles Kenyon, the author of 
"Kindling," wrote the scenario, us- 
ing Ambroise Thomas' grand opera 
and Goethe's "Wilhelm Meister." 

On this scenario, the California 
Motion Picture Corporation expend- 
ed its best efforts, aided, in a most 
unusual way, by no less than four 
of the wealthiest residents of the 
Bay cities, Arthur W. Poster and 
Henry E. Bothin, of San Rafael, 
Mrs. Theodore P. Payne, of Menlo 
Park, and Eugene de Sabla, Jr., of 
Hillsborough, all of whom gladly 
loaned the use of their beautiful 
country homes for the purpose of 
filming such scenes as castles in 
France, palaces in Italy and forests 
in Southern Germany. 



Tickets for the Mardi Gras Ball 
will not be put on public sale un- 
til February 13th, three days be- 
fore the star social event of the sea- 
son, but tickets may be obtained 
from any of the members of the 
Childrens Hospital Auxiliary which 
has the ball in charge. The list of 
women from whom tickets may be 
obtained includes Mrs. George Cam- 
eron, Mrs. Templeton Crocker, Mrs. 
William H. Taylor, Jr., Mrs. Fred 
MeNear, Mrs. Augustus Taylor, Mrs. 
Horace Pillsbury, Mrs. Henry Scott, 



.Mrs. Walter Martin, Mrs. Julian 
Thome, Mrs. Lawrence Scott, Mrs. 
Harry Poctt, Mis. Latham McMul- 

lin. Mis. Henry Kicrsted, Mrs. 
Charles Pelton, Mrs. Norris Davis. 
Mis. Henry Dutton, .Mrs. Sam 
Boardman, Mrs. Harry Bates, and 
the Misses Kinily Carolan, Minnie 
Houghton, and Marian Zeile. Miss 
Anna Peters, who is to be Queen 
.Malic Antoinette and rule over the 
festivities, has returned from stock- 
ton with her royal health very much 
improved. The royal spouse for 
Queen Anna has not yet been chos- 
en, the executive committee de- 
ciding that there was plenty of time 
to crown a king, whereas such mat- 
ters as printing and bill posting 
must be disposed of at once. So the 
Queen still looks into the tea-eups 
for her fortune while three of her 
ladies-in-waiting have already cour- 
tiers provided for them. Lansing 
Tevis, Dan Volkmann, and Dean 
Witter are the three already chosen. 
* «- * -::• 

The society drama, "To-day," 
which created quite a sensation in 
New York last season, where it ran 
longer than any contemporary 



dramas, i- attracting considerable 

patronage to the ('..it Theatre. It 
deals with a subject which is up- 
permost in the mind of almost ev- 
ery n an clothes ,and the gentler 

sex Beemingly have taken bo it as if 
it were meant for them alone. But 
tin' men in attendance always seem 
to get a line moral out of its prin- 
ciple Female character, who is not 
only enchained by Dame Fashion 
but is a slave to all the luxuries 
which wealth can bring, even to the 
extreme limit of forgetting her mar- 
ital vows. 

Arthur Hyion, who has been re- 
called as the leading man for Mrs. 
Piske in "The High Road," is win- 
ning high praise for his delicate 
handling of the trying role of the 
husband, and Bertha Mann shows 
by her portrayal of the vain, shal- 
low, selfish wife that she is well on 
the way to stardom. The entire 
supporting company is of unusual 
excellence. 

The engagement will continue 
throughout this week and next, 
with popular matinees on Wednes- 
day and the usual matinees on Sat- 
urdays. 



"Peg o' My Heart", with Peggy 
O'Nei] in the title role, comes to the 
Cdrt mi Sunday, January 31. 




S. F. QUINTET CLUB 

This Sun. Aft, at 2:30 
Colonial Ballroom, St. Francis Hotel 
Tickets 50c and 11.00 at Music stores 

STEINWAY PIANO 



ALMA GLUCK 
. . . PRIM \ 1 'i i.nxa si IPRANI • 

Columbia Theater 

2 Sunday afternoons 
January 31— February 7 

Tickets $2.50, $2.00, $1.50, $1.00 at Sher- 
man Clay & Co., Kohler and Chase and 
Columbia Theatre. 

Coming- Soon 

ZIMBALIST 

The Poet of the VioUn 



Then Maggie Teyte 




One Week Commencing- Sunday, Jan. 24 

Beatriz Michelena 

IN 

MIGNON 




Definitely establishing the San Fran- 
cisco prima donna as the greatest and 
most beautiful artist now appearing in 
motion pictures. 

This production has an illustrious 
descent, — first woven into story by 
Goethe in his masterpiece "Wilheim 
Meister", adapted to Grand Opera by 
Ambroise Thomas and immortalized in 
motion pictures by Beatriz Michelena 
at her best. 

Scenario by Chas. Kenyon, Author of 
••Kindling". 

Produced under the personal supervis- 
ion of Alex E. Beyfuss. 

tut 

"i<pffimRiir% " 



B MOTION PICTURE CORPORATION 



Distributed exclusively through World 
Film Corporation 



JACK E. GARDNER in Sketch at Orpheum 




18 



THE WASP 



Saturday, January 23, 1914 



(Continued from page 5) 

young Astor will bring letters to 
many of our prominent people, and 
will toe dined and wined toy Mrs. 
Peter Martin whose cousin, Herman 
Oelrichs, Jr., is one of Vincent As- 
tor's most intimate friends. 

Prince and Princess Rospigliosi, 
nee Helen Stallo, one of the two 
millionaire Stallo sisters, plan to 
come her a little later in the win- 
ter, first visiting the Princess' for- 
mer home at Long Beach. 

Another titled visitor who is ex- 
pected here for .the Pair is the 
Countess Pestities, who will journey 
through the Canal in her private 
yacht. The Countess, who was here 
last atoout ten years ago, was Miss 
Eila Haggin of this city, the daugh- 
ter of Louis Haggin, and a grand- 
daughter of old James B. Haggin. 
Her marriage to Count Pestities was 
a large social event here, after which 
she and her titled bridegroom sail- 
ed off on their yacht "Tolna" for 
a romantic honeymoon among the 
South Sea Isles. But, unfor- 
tunately, the crew mutinied at Sa- 
moa and the Count and Countess 
were forced to return to San Fran- 
cisco on a prosaic liner. Marital 
happiness was very short lived for 
them, however, and the Countess 
soon took up her separate abode in 
Paris, where she spends most of 

her time. 

* * * * 

The Spencer Eddys 

Everyone is delighted over the 
news that the Spencer Eddys are 
to arrive here next month and have 
apartments at the Fairmont with 
the idea of remaining until sum- 
cer. 

As Lurline Spreckels, Mrs. Eddy 
was one of our most sought-after 
belles, and it was with genuine re- 
gret that society bade her farewell 
after her first season of belledom. 
With her mother, Mrs. C. Augustus 
Spreckels, she lived for some time 
in Paris when the devoted atten- 
tions of Santos Dumont, the French 
inventor and avitaor, gave raise to 
numerous rumors of their bethro- 
thal. Her marriage to Spencer Ed- 
dy of Chicago was a very brilliant 
affair, after which they went to live 
in Moscow, young Eddy being in 
the diplomatic corps. 

Mrs. Eddy_ is a cousin of Miss 
Ruby Bond of San Mateo, whose 
mother was Miss Ruby Dore, a sis- 
ter of Mrs. Spreckels, who was Miss 
Ory Dore before her marriage. 

Mr- and Mrs. Spreckels lintend 
joining their son-in-law and daugh- 
ter here later in the spring. 

* * * * 

Her Husband's Trousers 

All of the peninsula set is shriek- 
ing with joy over the recent epi- 
sode of the Payne ball, at the St. 
Francis hotel, last week, when a 
certain irate husband was forced 
to fume and cuss till he was black 
in the face over the strange and 
totally inexplicable disappearance 
of his full-dress trousers. Friend 
Wife appeared on the scene, gay 
and chipper as could be, and never 
even noticed that her better half 
was missing until some one called 



her attention to the fact. He, in 
the meantime, was raving on one 
of the ffoors atoove, getting every 
conceivable flunkey in the hostelry 
on the still hunt for the missing 
most necessary apparel, but of no 
avail, until quite half of the even- 
ing was gone, when they seemed to 
turn up with very little excuse for 
their absence. Everyone, of course, 
was full of theories as to what 
might have happened, but just pos- 
sibly the festive young wife, who 
escaped several hours of her jealous 
husband's angry eye, might be the 
only one with the true solution. 
But far be it from me to mix in 
family affairs. 

Miss Elva de Pue, who is one of 
the mos(t popular mlaids pt 'the 
younger set and who, though not 
as handsome as her younger sister 
Corrinale, has much style and 
dash about her, is looking very 
well these days in a plum-colored 
velvet costume made in the loose 
full style, with a little Sir Walter 
Raleigh cape of velvet in back. Her 
hat is one of the new spring styles 
of sand-colored satin, which are 
so popular these days. 

Miss Louise Janin, who is taking 
very little part in the festivities'" 
of society lately and who is 
devoting a great deal of her time 
to literature and art, is looking 
most unusually attractive in a 
tailor suit of brown velvet, made 
on the Russian blouse style and 
fastened high up at the neck with 
a band of fur. 

Mrs. Herbert Allen, who was hand- 
some Gertrude Joliffe, and a bride 
of only a couple of months, is 
wearing a very smart tailored gown 
in the new • fall shade of brown, 
which is becoming so popular this 
season. With it she wears a large 
round white satin hat ornamented 
with a wide band of fur. 



come so exacting and stern, it has 
been practically the only game pos- 
sible. 

A bag of clubs in a cabin enatoled 
a man to nip off at any port where 
a stay of a few hours was made 
and get a game. There are few 
places in Ireland, Scotland or Eng- 
land where there is not a links of 
some kind or other. It is, however, 
about the only pastime that has 
apparently not been engaged in so 
far by the troops between rounds. 
French and British officers have re- 
cently organized a pack of hounds 
to chase the many foxes that were 
observed in the wake of the armies, 
and the men in the ranks are play- 
ing everything from cricket to hop- 
scotch. 

The equanimity of Jack Neville, 
Davis or Bobbie Eyre themselves 
would scarcely be able to stand the 
strain of a "Jack Johnson" or 
"Coal box" shell explosion when a 
twelve-foot put was in progress. 



The Beauty Shop 




212 STOCKTON STREET 

UNION SQUARE 

SAN FRANCISCO. CAL 



| 
X 

v 
I 

I 

I 

! 

I 

x 

i 

1 

I 



FOB SALE 




Hair Dressing and Manicuring 

Toilet Preparations 

Electrolysis 

Exclusive Beauty Shop and 
Specialists 

X Telephone Garfield 8130 i- 
A ♦ 

♦*~*~.— .— .~..V***VV..*VVV*»*V*.*VVV* ••%*•.**»•*»•*.• 

»:~:~>«.K"X~:-:~:":.<-x«>:":~M":~:":~:'«<' 

? 
X 

* 

•;♦ A Wholesale and Retail Wine *> 

*£ and Liquor House, located in *t # 

X downtown San Francisco. A very «?• 

♦*• old established business. The y 

V owner desires to go to Europe. # l* 

A For further particulars apply to ♦*♦ 

A room 347, at 49 Geary St. Tele- ♦*♦ 

.*♦ phone Douglas 1871. ♦> 

MONEY LOANED on Diamonds 
and Jewelry. 2 per cent per month. 
Columbia Loan Office, 3 Stockton 

street. Est. 1872 



Rudyard Kipling has frequently 
tilted at the "sacredness of the golf 
courses" in his recent war verses. 
There is no doutot that it has been 
almost more than flesh can bear 
fordyed-in-the-wool worshippers of 
the cleek and mashie to see their 
tenderly tended turf desecrated by 
the heels and hoofs of the tramping 
soldiery. But most clubs have 
shown a fine spirit of patriotism. 
Recent European exchanges giving 
the lists of fallen officers contain 
name after name of fine players, 
well known to America who have 
played on the classic resorts across 
the seas. As a matter of fact, prac- 
tically every British Navy and 
Army officer is more or less a good 
player. In the Navy of recent years, 
where the training has been be- 



r 



Wedding Rings 
Scmide/iCb: 

Watchmakers, Jewelers, Opticians. 
715 Market St., Nr. Third. 



LEGAL NOTICES. 



NOTICE TO CREDITORS 
Estate of Olney Speer, deceased. 
Notice is hereby given by the under- 
signed administrator of the estate of 
Olney Speer, deceased, to the creditors 
of and all persons having claims against 
the said deceased, to exhibit them with 
the necessary vouchers within 4 months 
after the first publication of this notice 
to the said administratorat the office of 
M. J. Hs'nes, Public Administrator, 858 
Phelan Building, San Francisco, Cali- 
fornia, which said office the undersigned 
selects as his place of business in all 
matters connected with said estate of 
Olnev Speer, deceased. 

M. J. HYNES, 
Administrator of the estate of Olney 

Speer, deceased. 
Dated, San Francisco, Jan. 5, 1915. 



SUMMONS TO ESTABLISH TITLE 

IN THE SUPERIOR COURT of the 

State of California in and for the City 

and County of San Francisco. 

Action No. 35277. 
Gerald C. Halsey, Attorney for Plaintiff. 
HARLOW W. CULVER and ELLA F. 

CULVER, his wife, Plaintiffs, 
vs. 
All persons claiming any interest in, or 

lien upon, the real property herein 

described or any part thereof, De- 
fendants. 

THE PEOPLE OF THE STATE OF 
CALIFORNIA: 

To all persons claiming any interest 
in, or lien upon, the real property here- 
in described or any part thereof, defend- 
ants, greeting: 

You are hereby required to appear 
and answer the complaint of HARLOW 
W. CULVER and ELLA F. CULVER, 
his wife, plaintiffs, filed with the Clerk 
of the above entitled Court and City and 
County, within three months after the 
first publication of this Summons, and 
to set forth what interest or lien, if any, 
you have in or upon that certain real 
property or any part thereof, situated 
in the City and County of San Francis- 
co, State of California, particularly de- 
scribed as follows: 

COMMENCING at a point on the 
Northerly line of Hayes Street distant 
thereon Two Hundred and Thirty-four 
(234) feet 4-% inches Westerly from 
the Westerly line of Baker Street; run- 
ning thence westerly and along said 
Northerly line of Hayes street Twenty- 
five (25) feet; thence at a right angle 
Northerly One Hundred and Thirty-sev- 
en (137) feet 6 inches; thence at a right 
angle Easterly twenty-five feet (25) 
feet; thence at a right angle Southerly 
One Hundred and Thirty-seven (137) 
feet 6 inches to the Northerly line of 
Hayes street and the point of com- 
mencement. 

BEING part of Western Addition 
Block No. 594. 

And you are hereby notified that, un- 
less you so appear and answer, the 
plaintiffs will apply to the Court for the 
relief demanded in the complaint, to- 
wit: That it be adjudged that the plain- 
tiffs are the owners of said property in 
fee simple as absolute; that their title 
to said property be established and 
quieted; that the Court ascertain and 
determine all estates, rights, titles, in- 
terests and claims in and to said prop- 
erty, and every part thereof, whether 
the same be legal or equitable, present 
or future, vested or contingent, and 
whether the same consists of mortgages 
or liens of any description; that plain- 
tiffs recover their costs herein and have 
such other and further relief as may be 
meet in the premises. 

WITNESS my hand and the seal of 
said Court this 29th day of December, 
A. D., 1914. 

H. I. MULCREVT, Clerk. 
By S. I. Hughes, Deputy Clerk. 

The first publication of this summons 
was made in The Wasp newspaper on 
the 2nd day of January, A. D., 1915. 

The following persons are said to 
claim an interest in, or lien upon, said 
property adverse to plaintiff. 

Bank of Italy, a corporation, Mont- 
gomery and Clay Streets, San Francisco. 
California. 

Gerald C. Halsey, Attorney for Plain- 
tiffs, Rooms 501-502-503 California-Pa- 
cific Building, 105 Montgomery Street, 
San Francisco, Cal. 



SUMMONS 

IN THE SUPERIOR COURT of the 
State of California, in and for the 
City and Countv of San Francisco. 
EDNA M. HEIN,' Plaintiff, vs. PEDRO 
GARCIA and BONITA GARCIA, his 
wife, defendant. Edward Lande, at- 
torney for plaintiff. 

No. 59413. Action brought in the Su- 
perior Court of the State of California 
in and for the City and County of San 
Francisco, and the complaint filed in the 
office of the County Clerk of said City 
and County. 

THE PEOPLE OF THE STATE OF 
CALIFORNIA SEND GREETINGS TO: 
Pedro Garcia and Bonita Garcia, his 
wife, defendants. 

YOU ARE HEREBY DIRECTED to 
appear and answer the complaint in an 
action entitled as above, brought against 
you in the Superior Court of the State 
of California, in and for the City and 
County of San Francisco, within ten 
days after the service on you of this 
alias summons — if served within this 
City and County; or within thirty days 
if served elsewhere. 

And you are hereby notified that un- 
less you appear and answer as above 
required, the said Plaintiff -will take 
judgment for the money or damages de- 
manded in the complaint as arising upon 
contract or will apply to the Court for 
the relief demanded in the complaint. 

GIVEN under my hand and seal of 
the Superior Court at the City and Coun- 
ty of San Francisco, State of California, 
this 5th day of December, A. D. 1914. 

K. I. MULCREVY, Clerk. 
(SEAL) By H. Brunner, 

Deputy Clerk. 






THE WASP 




BERTHA MANN, the Leading Woman in "To-day at the Cort 



Wellington Coal 

Best for Family Use 
For Sale by All Dealers 



Western Fuel Co. 



MINERS AND SHIPPERS 



PATRICK & CO. 

RUBBER STAMPS 

STENCILS 
SEALS 
BADGES 
SIGNS, ETC. 

560 Market St. San Francisco 



Sultan Turkish Baths 



624 POST STREET 

Special Department for Ladies 

Open Day and Night for Ladies and 
Gentlemen. 

Al. Johnson, formerly of Sutter Streel 
Hammam has leased the Sultan Turkish 
Baths, where he will be glad to Bee hiB 
old and new customers. 




Josephine L. Ca.ro 



lino of the intellectual und artistic 
treats of the winter will be a series of 
twelve readings of Modern Dramas, de- 
scriptive and illustrative of the life, 
manners and customs of the different 
countries, rendered by Josephine L,. Caro. 

This will be Mrs. Caru's first public 
reading In San Francisco this season. 
Her interpretations of modern dramas 
I'lavi; wmi lor lu'i' an enviable reputation 
in the artistic world. Most of her ren- 
ditions in this city have been in private 
salons to selected audiences. 

These public readings will be held in 
the art gallery of Paul Elder, 239 Grant 
Avenue, beginning Thursday, January 
28th and continuing weekly until April 
15th. This series is known as "Drama 
Travelogues" and will include: 

1. America. Thursday, January 28th. 
•■Romance" by Edward Sheldon, 

2. England. Thursday, February 4 th. 
"The Mob" by John Galesworthy. 

3. Ireland. Thursday, February 11th. 
"Patriots" by Lenox Kobinson. 



I. Wales. Thursday, February 18th. 
"Change" by J. O. Francis, 

5. France. Thursday, February 25th. 
"The Other Danger" by Maurice Donnay. 

6. (a) Spain, Thursday, March 4th. 
"Marianna" by Jose Echargary. 

(b) Italy. Thursday, March 4th. 
"Sacred Ground" by Guiseppe Giacosa. 

7. (a) Austria. Thursday, March 11. 
"Anatol" by Arthur Schnitzler. 

( b) Germany. Thursday. March 11. 
"Margot" by Hermann Sudermann. 

8. Belgium. Thursday, March 18th. 
"Pelleas and Melisand" by Maurice 
Maeterlinck. 

9. Holland. Thursday, March 25th. 
"The Storm Bird" by Donaert Von Elton. 

10. Norway. Thursday, April 1st. 
"Laboremus" by Bjornstijerne Bjornson. 

II. Russia. Thursday, April 8th. 
"The Sea Gull" by Anton Tcheckoff. 

1 2. India. Thursday, April 15th. 
"King of the Dark Chamber" by Rabin- 
dranath Tagore. 



LA GRANDE & WHITES 
LAUNDRY CO. 



Office and Works: 234 Twelfth St. 
Bet. Howard and Folaom Sib 

SAN FRANCISCO. - - CALIFORNIA 
Telephone Market 916 



Send for Our Select List of 

EIGHTY CALIFORNIA PAPERS 

You can insert Display 

Ads in the entire list for 

EIGHT DOLLARS AN INCH 

Dake Advertising Agency, Inc. 



432 S. MAIN ST. 
Los Angeles 



121 SECOND ST. 

San Francisco 



Office Hour. 
9 a. m. to 5:20 p. m. 
Phone Doudu 1501 



Residence 
573 Rfth Avenue 
Hour. 6 to 7:30 p. a 
Phone Padtc Z75 



W. H. PYBURN 

NOTARY PUBLIC 

My Motto "ALWAYS IN" 
On parie Fr.ncnii Se habla Ejp.no 

Of (ice: 229 Montgomery Street 

S«ua Frmnciaco C.Uforai. 



Valuable Information 

Of a Business, Personal or Social Nature 

from the Pros of the 

Pacific Coast 

ALLEN'S 

Press Clipping Bureau 

88 riRST STREET 

SAN FRANCISCO, CALIFORNIA 
Telephone Kearny 392 



San Francisco's Restaurant de Luxe 

Adjoining the Columbia Theatre 

You do not know this city until you have dined at FRED SOLARI'S, 
San Francisco's most palatial restaurant. World famous for its dis- 
tinctive cuisine and polite service. 

DANS ANTS EVERY EVENING 
EXCEPT SUNDAY 
in main dining room, under direction of competent lady manager. A 
place of beauty and refinement and the right people about you. 

FRED SOLARI'S GRILL 

CORNER MASON AND GEARY STREETS 



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ROUTE 



leans service 
Scemery Satisfaction 



THE 



Distinctive San Francisco Route 



TICKET OFFICES: 
665 MARKET STREET 1326 BROADWAY, OAKLAND 



Phone Sutter 16S1 



Phone Oafclond 132 



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Golden State limited 

VIA LOS ANGELES 

Chicago, St. Louis, 
Kansas City 

From San Francisco, Ferry Station 
6:00 P.M. DAILY 



leirira 

The Exposition Line — 1915 — First in Safety. 



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NIGHT AND DAY SERVICE 

Franklin Engraving Co. 




-£>> 



DESIGNERS, ILLUSTRATORS i\ m m 
THREE COLOR HALF TONE WORKl W§ 
^ HALF TONE aZINC ETCHING^ 





11$ Columbus Avenue 
San Francisco, Cal. 

Our Art Department Creates Distinctive and Original Designs 
for Booklets, Newspaper Advertising and all Stationery 
of Highest Quality. 

The Photo-Engraving Department Produces Cuts in all the 
Modern Processes of Tri-color, Multi-color, Copper 
Halftones, Zinc Etchings and Embossing Dies 



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~4 WEEKLY JOURNAL jj 
ILLUSTRATION ** COMMENT 




ESTABLISHED i* 1676 









I 







EVER DRINK A WHISKY 
THIRTY-FIVE YEARS OLD 

'HAT exquisite pleasure has 
been granted to but very few 
people. Back in' the year l8$2 
the late A. P. Hotaling began 
storing old whiskies in his cellars 
on "Jackson Street as a basis for 
' blending in later years. There 
the barrels reposed year after 
year while the whiskies were 
mellowed by the subtle process 
of time. Every approximate 
ten years, when the contents of each barrel were 
materially diminished by outage (evaporation), the 
whiskies were drawn off into vats and reduced to an 
even palatable proof. Later accumulations of very 
old whiskies were added and blended and drawn off 
into newly charred barrels of small capacity, so that the 
whiskies could more easily come in contact with the 
wood and absorb the tannin in the char. This added a 
rich color and flavor. A limited amount was sold to the 
trade at the end of each ten-year period. The process 
was repeated every approximate ten years. Today we 
have whiskies in our cellars that have as their base those 
distilled thirty-live years ago. This careful blending 
and aging has produced a pure, wholesome whisky — 
smooth as velvet — rich in bouquet. One taste and you 
get the significance of its character. No whisky like it 
can be had in California, and we doubt if Kentucky has 
anything finer. A limited amount will be sold direct 
to the consumer in sealed packages for s 10- a gallon. 

A. P. HOTALING & CO. 

n9 429 jackson street 
San Francisco 




THE WASP 



LEADING HOTELS AND RESORTS 



Have You Dined in the 

Palace Hotel 
Court? 

Service and Cuisine Perfect 



Fairmont Under Same Management 



Palace Hotel Company 



MOTEL OAKLAND 

OAKLAND 

Table d'Hote Sinners 

Tuesdays, Thursdays, Sundays 

$1.25 Per plate with wine 

Informal Dinner Dansants Thursdays VICTOR REITER, Manager 



Special Notice 

During January we will give free a pretty wine tray with 
cash purchases of $2.00 and over. 

Kentucky Mercantile Co. 

X Phone Sutter 4031 488 SUTTER ST. 

r n 



i 

X 



I 

•? 
X 



HOTEL SOMERTON 

Now Open 
440 GEARY STREET 

Opposite Columbia Theatre 



Connected with Cecil Hotel 
and Under Same Management 
Newly Furnished — 

Strictly First-Class 

MRS. W. F. MORRIS, Proprietor 



TAKE A TRAVEL TIP 

Swift, Safe Electric Service Via the 

Oakland, Antioch & 
Eastern Railway 

Between San Francisco, Oakland, Berke- 
ley, Sacramento, Chico, Oroville, 
Marysville, Colusa, "Wood- 
land and Pittsburg 1 



Observation Cars 
For Comfort 



Key Eoute Ferry 
in San Francisco 

Sutter 2339 



Automatic Block 
Sig-nals for Safety 




'ortieth and Shafter 
Avenue 
In Oakland 
Piedmont 870 



FAIRMONT HOTEL 

Recognized as the most complete and beautiful residence hotel in the 
world. 500 rooms, every one witli attached bath. 

The Rendezvous of the discriminating- travelers from every land 
Largest floor space devoted to public use of any hotel in the world 
EUROPEAN PLAN 

PALACE HOTEL COMPANY 

SAN FRANCISCO 

1 Person $3.00 to 55.00 

2 Persons 55.00 to $8.00 



The management of the 

Hotel St. Francis 

announces the inauguration of dancing in 

the Rose Room, weekday evenings 

Dancing 9 o'clock. Evening dress. 

Dinner and Supper a la Carte 

Geary street entrance or 

through hotel 



JULES RESTAURANT 




DANCING 

Every Thursday and Saturday Evenings 



Dinner with Wine $1.00 
675 MARKET STREET 



Dancing at 7 p. m. 

OPP. CHRONICLE 



Established 1853 

Monthly Contracts $1.50 per Month 

NEW 'WORKS JUST ERECTED AT 

27 TENTH STREET, S. P. 

Largest and Most Up-to-Date on Pacific 
Coast. Wagons call twice daily. Cleaning 
Dainty Garments Our Specialty. 

F. THOMAS PARISIAN DYEING & CLEANING WORKS 




SING CHONG CO. 




LEADING CHINESE 
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and Retail Dealers in 

ORIENTAL ART 
GOODS 

Kimonos, Silk Under- 
wear, Jade, Jewelry, Iv- 
ory Furniture, etc. 

601-611 GRANT AVE. 

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Opp. St. Mary's Church 

Chinatown 



H»K-:~X"K"M~t~x~x~:~H"X~M~K~:~:' 



San Francisco 's Fashion able Society, Play and Frolic, in The WASP 






WOULD MUZZLE PRESS 

Because a certain new publication 
in San Francisco has dared to print 
the truth about conditions and 
people as they really exist, an at- 
tempt was made recently to silence 
the editors by the gunmen system 
of argument. Decent, law-abiding 
citizens of this city must revolt at 
this tenderloin method of retalia- 
tion. To attempt to muzzle the 
press by the gun method shows, 
not only a low grade of intellect, 
but a contempt for the courts of 
San Francisco that reflects in a se- 
rious manner upon the personnel 
of its judges. San Francisco has 
no chance of gaining a reputation 
as a clean moral city as long as 
such conditions obtain. 

The new publication made one 
bad mistake when it attacked Te- 
chau Tavern in its initial number. 
It is known by every San Francis- 
can that the Tavern is the cleanest 
and best regulated cafe in the city, 
and the vicious attack made upon 
it smacks of personal spitework 
But in the main, the publication 
has turned a penetrating ray of 
light upon evils and vices that the 
decent citizens of this city did not 
know existed. It tells the truth in 
a crude, raw manner, but it is the 
truth nevertheless. 

The point at issue is this; can 
the press of San Francisco be si- 
lenced by the gun-play of its unde- 
sirable citizens? The Freedom of 
the Press once meant something. 
Today it is a mere phrase, empty of 
real meaning. Dirt and indecency 
hate the light, and as long as bul- 
lets and clubs rule, San Francisco 
will be in darkness. It is claimed 
by many that the daily press is 
afraid to publish the truth. What 
facts are allowed to appear are so 
distorted that no good is accom- 
plished by them. Such is the situa- 
tion in San Francisco today. It is 
about time that conditions change, 
and for the newspaper men of the 
city to prove that truth and de- 
cency arc not at the mercy of a low 
order of thugs and gunmen. 



Perhaps It Was 

Mrs. Hazel Ricks Emerson says 
her husband, who is Captain T. H. 
Emerson, slighted her in public 
and she has riled suit for divorce. 
The Captain refused to introduce 
her to his friends. A certain lady 
of the same set made the sugges- 
tion: "Perhaps the oversight was 
a compliment." 




THE SELF-ELECTED GREAT 



It is a nasty mix-up and reflect s no credit either on John Trask and 
Ihe Pine Arts Department of the Exposition; or those other gentlemen, 
who ;is judges, dictators, and settlers of old scores, have- been directly 
responsible for the mess. Reference is made to the selction of pic- 
uires for the California exhibit by Messrs. Neuhaus, Matthews, and 
McComas, slightly abetted by William Wendt of Los Angeles and 
Paul (Justin of Seattle. Wendt. we understand, left town in a hurry, 
i lie shame of the proceeding reflected plainly in his face. If Gustin 
is still in the city, he is in hiding. Yet the onus lies not with them. They 
were a minority of the jury, a cowardly one, perhaps, but- with Neu- 
haus, McComas and Matthews in the majority and bent on venting a 
thousand spites, what could any minority, however courageous, ac- 
complish in the way of justice? 

In a previous article reviewing a meeting held by the artists of 
San Francisco requesting a California exhibit and a California jury 
separate from the three gentlemen mentioned (because at that time 
the artists of the city felt that they could not safely trust their pic- 
tures in such hands). The Wasp expressed confidence that the right 
thing would be done. It was our thought then that a proper present- 
ment of the matter might inspire a feeling of confidence and fairness 
all around. At that time, too, we understoo that the majority of the 
jury would be composed of Eastern men and outsiders, for such was 
the promise of the Exposition as printed in its official brochure to 
the artists, and the plan of having a majority of outsiders on the 
juries selecting the pictures of other cities had been followed. 

It was not the Eastern quota of the proposed jury that the artists 
of San Francisco feared, but the influence of the three men previously 
mentioned, and whom it is now proven they had every reason to dis- 
trust. And they felt that since they had complaint to make that a 
separate California exhibit and a California jury, made up of artists 
who posseessed a breadth of perception might be the thing. 

When this could not be done, and The Wasp does not think that it 
was necessary, why should these artists, who comprise some of the 
'jest known names in art in California, and with the feeling of prac- 
tically the whole body of California artists behind them, be turned 
over to the mercies of Neuhaus, Matthews, and McComas, the very 
men against whom they had entered objection? They had a right at 
least, as it was in other cities, to a jury composed of a majority of 
outsiders. 

John Trask, it seems, stood entirely aloof in the machinations. As 
iiead of the Fine Arts department he is nevertheless responsible, 
though the reasons for his attitude are not difficult to deduce. When 
some months ago he told that certain body of inartistic gold-diggers 
who run the town and the Exposition that what San Francisco needed 
was not so much "Boost," but a deeper sense of the beautiful and a 
love for art, he found on his neck, breathing brimstone in his ears, 
all of our clawing, cawing newspapers and a thousand balloon-brain- 
ed dignitaries denying the charge. It was quite true, however, and 
Trask was right. Let us frankly admit our faults. 

But his umbrage at the San Francisco artists asking for a Cali- 
fornia jury was wrong, because he must have known perfectly well 
why they did so. It may be, however, that he was forced into a corner. 
(Continued on page 7) 




NED'S FATTED CALVES 

With the menfolk of society hark- 
ing back to the court of Louis Qua- 
torze of France for costuming for 
the Mardi Gras ball at the Palace, 
and with the revelations brought 
by black silk knickerbockers, black 
silk hose, black pumps, and frilled 
shirt bosoms, we will have a chance 
at last to see the fatted calves of 
Ned Grcenway glancing in the gold- 
en glare. San Francisco has waited 
a long time for the sight. But 
never, never have the legs stood 
forth. We have been treated occa- 
sionally with partial glimpses, but 
the true and supposedly painful 
architecture has never manoeuvred 
unpinched and unpadded in light. 
Will it be Greek, or Roman, or 
Moorish, or wabbly? At any rate, 
the mysterious pair are the specu- 
lation of the social set, including 
all of its charming young matrons. 
* * * * 

Nevills Hit Hard 

Captain W. A. Nevills in a will 
presented for probate in this city 
cuts his son off with something like 
the proverbial shilling. The Cap- 
tain, who plucked his fortune in 
the flush days of California mining, 
was quite a noted character. A 
story is told of a meeting between 
he and Joaquin Miller. One was as 
characteristically gruff as the other. 

"I hear that you are a poet," snap- 
ped Nevills, as an appendix to con- 
verastion. 

"There are some people who have 
to be informed on such points," 
returned the Poet of the Sierras, as 
a shot to the bows. 

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* Jewelry A 

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X Sterling Silver and Plate 

V 

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& with 14k. Gold and Silver 



Post Street and Grant Avenne 
San Francisco 



•X~X"X~X~X"X"X~X"X"X«><X»J>** 




TUB WASP 



Saturday, January 30, 1915 




INS AND OUTS OF 
THE SOCIAL WORLD 



BY GEACE TIBBITS 



Lillian Returns 

A bit oi news which is setting the 
smart set agog with interest and 
curiosity, and which has so far 
quite escaped the busy dailies, is 
the return of the beautiful blond 
widow, Mrs. Lillian Wagner Mc- 
Carthy Moore, whose husband the 
late J. J. Moore, capitalist, met a 
tragic death at the hands of one, 
Timothy, chauffeur for the Henry 
Clarence Breedens. Everyone re- 
calls that famous case, or cases, 
rather, for there were two; first the 
notorious divorce suit filed by the 
wealthy husband against his beau- 
tiful wife, in which he named half 
a dozen well known club men as 
co-respondents, and dragged in 
most of the smart peninsula set as 
well as the creme de-la creme of 
San Francisco as witnesses; and 
secondly, the murder trial which 
ensued when Timothy returning 
from an automobile ride with the 
lovely Lillian was ambushed and 
fired on by the irate husband, who 
had concealed his portly person in 
the shrubbery in the garden of his 
San Mateo home and was in turn 
shot by the husky chauffeur, re- 
ceiving a wound which resulted in 
his death in a San Prancisco hospit- 
al a few days later. Ah, those were 
stirring times for our haut ton. No- 
body knew from day to day who 
was to be dragged into the dirty 
mess later, and every one who had 
ever enjoyed the friendship or the 
hospitality of either Moore or his 
wife, shivered in his boots daily 
lest they be subpoenaed to appear 
and testify as to the domestic re- 
lations of the Moores. Finally the 
divorce suit came to an end, with- 
out either husband or wife receiv- 
ing a decree, Mrs. Moore having 
filed a counter suit in the mean- 
time. Scarcely had the excitement 
from that case died down, however, 
when the tragic shooting affray oc- 
curred and the bones of the Moore 
family skeleton rattled again, and 
Timothy, who J. J. had accused of 
undue intimacy with his spouse, 
came up and faced a jury, on trial 
for murder. 

After his acquittal on the ground 
of self-defense Mrs. Moore sued her 
step-son, Jefferson Moore, for a 
share of the late millionaire's estate, 
but finally was forced to be content 
with a meagre $30,000 in cash and 
the furnishings of the family home 
in San Mateo. These she sold at 
auction and with the proceeds from 
this sale and her small inheritance 
started for Europe. Her young 
daughter Lillian accompanied her 
to France, and Timothy also disap- 
peared from his accustomed haunts, 
and it was rumored had joined the 
fair widow abroad. But the out- 
break of the war caused Mrs. Moore 
to return to the United tSates with 




the other thousands of American 
travelers, and gradually she jour- 
neyed west, finally reaching San 
Francisco. Here she is domiciled in 
a modest little apartment in an un- 
fashionable neighborhood and has 
failed to communicate with any of 
her former friends. Mrs. Moore is 
a sister of Mrs. Thomas Eastland, 
who was Helen Wagner. Her first 
husband was the wealthy real es- 
tate man now of Los Angeles, E. 
Avery McCarthy, by whom she had 
three children, Aileen, a debutante 
of last winter in Los Angeles so- 
ciety, who makes her home with her 
father and step-mother, the former 
Susie Howard, in the southern me- 
tropolis, a iioy who died in infancy 
and the young girl Lillian, whose 
name the mother changed to Moore 
after her marriage to the capitalist. 
* * * * 

The Cynosure of Eyes 

Quite unusually brilliant was 
the dinner dance at the Fairmont 
Hotel on Tuesday evening where the 
dancing set trotted and waltzed to 
the tune of "hot birds and cold 
bottles. Among the many hand- 
somely gowned maids and matrons 
there, the two Gregg girls stood out 
quite distinctly ahead of the others. 
Both in black gowns, the resem- 
blance was so close that they were 
hard to distinguish. Enid, who 
danced many times and oft with 
her debonnaire husband, Stewart 
Haldom, was quite without any 
color to relieve her sombre costume, 



and a large comb of brilliants in 
her dark hair was her only orna- 
ment. The cleverest dancers were 
the James Kellehers, who glide al- 
most with the assurance of profes- 
sionals. Anne Peters, who, of 
course, received much attention on 
account of the recent honors be- 
stowed upon her, was in a very 
quaint frock of old rose taffeta 
made in the mode of 1850. 

The three stunning Hopkins sis- 
ters were there with their usual ac- 
companiment of youthful admirers 
and Miss Marion Zeile was very 
stunning in a sand colored gown 

trimmed in bands of old rose. 

* * - * * 

The Dove Alights 
The latest reports from Santa 
Barbara, that land of sunshine and 
flowers mingled with an occasion- 
al divorce, is that the William Mil- 
ler Grahams have decided to bury 
the hatchet and once more shelter 
the dove of peace in their white 
marble home overlooking the sea. 
Whether "son Earl" has been act- 
ing i n the role of peacemaker since 
his return from Oklahoma, or 
whether the Grahams discovered 
that they had no real "causus belli" 
to work on, is consuming every one 
with curiosity. At any rate, the 
dogs of war have been called off and 
the fairly rotund Billy and his 
handsome wife have once more 
flung the doors of "Bellos Guardo" 
open to their friends. 

* * # * 

Love's Dream Lost 

Quite pathetic is the ending of 
that pretty romance which started 
off with the simple little wedding 
of Miss Virginia Pierce and Dr. J. 
C. Burrows in Berkeley not more 
than three weeks ago. The hand- 




Beautiful Beatriz Michelena 



some doctor, who seemed to have 
an absent-minded way of passing 
bad checks, was arrested the other 
day in Seattle for giving one for a 
thousand dollars to John Gamble 
of Santa Barbara in return for a 
very charming painting done by 
the artist, who, by the by, was a 
personal friend. Pretty little Mrs. 
Burrows has returned to her par- 
ents, Mr. and Mrs. James Pierce of 
Cloyne Court, Berkeley, quite brok- 
en-hearted, but with the intention 
of drowning her shattered illusions 
in work. Before her marriage Mrs. 
Burrows was one of the stars of 
the Lombardi Opera Company, to 
which she intends once more to 
devote her energies. 
# # -» * 

Hust vs. "Woody." 

It is something of a relief to so- 
ciety to have the breathless sus- 
pense of the last few days ended, 
and a king finally named for the 
coming Mardi-Gras to share the 
royal honors with lovely Queen 
Anne Peters. It has been almost 
too much for our handsome cava- 
liers, this time of anxious wait- 
ing and wondering upon whose 
shoulders the royal robes were fin- 
ally to rest. But the days of 
preening and looking their best are 
over now, for Walter Hust has 
been invited to shine as king, and 
has accepted the distinguished 
honor. I have it on the best auth- 
ority that handsome Alfred Whit- 
tell was first choice and was really 
asked to be his king-ship, but de- 
clined the coveted honor. He is 
an attractive youth, this adopted 
son of Mr. and Mrs. George Whit- 
tell, and a very eligible party as 
well, for he will undoubtedly share 
the Whittell millions, which Mrs. 
Whittell, together with her sisters, 
Mrs. Athearn Folger and Mrs. Fife 
received from the great estate of 
their father, the late Nicholas Lun- 
ing, with that young scape-grace, 
George Whittell Jr. 

However, Walter Hust is a very 
suitable choice for king. He is a 
good looking chap, son of the Val- 
entine Hust's of Fruitvale, and 
brother to the four handsome Hust 
sisters, Estelle, widow of the late 
Tom Magee, Harriet, who married 
his brother, Will Magee, Florence, 
now the wife of Charles Bentley and 
a younger girl who married a rich 
Vermont man. Walter Hust will 
undoubtedly carry off his regal 
honors in first-class style. 

Everybody wonders why the pat- 
ronesses did not decide on popular 
Lieut. Commander Woodward as a 
fitting consort for Queen Anne, as 
his decided penchant for the 
sprightly Stockton belle is so well 
known, and the popular "Woody" 
would have made a fine robust 
Louis XVI. The fair maids of honor 
to the dashing Queen have all been 
named. They are the Misses Ernes- 
tine McNear, Marie Louise Black, 
Phyllis de Young, Corennah de 
Pue, Gertrude Strauss, Leslie Mil- 
ler, Beatrice Nickel and Gertrude 
Hopkins. A long list of cavaliers 



Saturday January 30, 1915 



THE WASP 



have also been named, so the court 
now is quite complete and prepara 
tions for the great event are now 
<-< > in i 11 tr mi apace. 

* * * * 

What is the Matter 
A newsy little bit whieh reached 
my ears the other day is the minor 
of a break in the engagement of 
young .laek Wilson, son of 
the well known broker of the 
same name, who is now facing in- 
dictment on several charges in the 
Federal Courts, and pretty Aileen 
Code, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. 
.lames Code, whieh was announced 
some months ago. The younger set 
are speculating as to the causes of 
the reputed rupture, which it is said 
occurred some little time ago. 
Whether the troubles of the elder 
Wilson have had any part in the 
matter, or whether the objec- 
tions of both families due to the 
youth of the pair have Anally pre- 
vailed is not known. 

Young Wilson, who makes his 
home with his mother and step- 
father, Dr. and Mrs. I. Walton 
Thome, is a mere boy, being 
still in his nineteenth year, and 
his pretty little fiancee or ex-fiancee 
if rumor is to be believed, is just 
eighteen. 



A $10,000 Ambition 

A pretty how-d'ye-do there will 
be in fashionable club circles here 
and down the Peninsula and in the 
bay cities if the last word of the 
gossips is really true. Every one 
knows of the Sequoia club, that ul- 
tra exclusive organization of our 
smart set about the bay, which it is 
said is to be the THE Country Club 
of California. The Sequoia Club 
was organized a year or go ago and 
includes on its membership list all 
the cream of Burlingame, San Mateo 
and San Francisco, as well as the 
leaders in society of Piedmont, Oak- 
land, Berkeley and Alameda. The 
Club has acquired a magnificent 
estate in Elmhurst consisting of 
many acres of wonderful field, val- 
ley and woodland and there the 
finest golf course in the state is be- 
ing laid out. The club house, too, 
is a gem. It was designed by Al- 
bert Parr and has all the latest 
wrinkles dear to the heart of a 
country clubber. The list of those 
invited to join was very carefully 
vised and only the elect were given 
a chance to subscribe the generous 
initiation fee. Now I hear that Rob- 
ert Roos, the wealthy young San 
Francisco merchant and man about 
town, not content with his mem- 
bership in the fashionable Beres- 
ford Country Club, which is the ex- 
clusive Jewish Club for San Fran- 
cisco and Peninsula society, has of- 
fered to subscribe $10,000 to the Se- 
quoia club provided his name is 
included on the membership list 

and that the offer has been refused ! 
Heavens! how unmercenary we are 

getting to be. 



A Famous Guest 

Society is greatly interested in the 

news that Camille Flunuiiurion, the 
world's most famous astronomer is 
coming to San Francisco to enjoy 
the delights of the Exposition as the 
guest of the Adolph Spreckels. Mr. 
and Mrs. Spreckels are close friends 
of the great French scientist and 
have prevailed upon him to accept 
their invitation to come to Califor- 
nia as their guest. Rodin, the 
great sculptor may also be of the 
party. Mr. Flammarion came into 
notoriety some years ago in a way 
quite outside his professional fame 
as the writer of love letters to Mad- 
ame Currie, the illustrious discov- 
erer of radium, when she was sued 
for divorce by the great savant her 
husband, who was associated with 
her in her many researches. Aside 
from her eminence as a scientist 
Mine. Curie is a very attractive wo- 
man. She has been awarded the 
highest honors ever accorded by 
the French government to a wo- 
man and was granted the nobel 
prize with her ex-husband as a 
recognition of her distinguished 
services to the world of science a 
few years ago. 



last September on a transport. Ee 
has resigned hi- commission of sec- 
ond lieutenant in tin' Army and 
will return shortly to engage in civil 
pursuits. Mrs. Speer has kept her 
friends guessing all winter as to 
her reason for not joining her hus- 
band in the Islands, as lie was 
stationed with his regiment, the 
13th Infantry in M ia.lnaethehbpo 
no one could quite understand why 
post in our island possessions, and 
the fair young bride was not with 
him. However, the announcement 
of his resignation and return will 
set aside the rumors of domestic in- 
felicity which are bound to gain 
credence when the young couple put 
eight thousand miles between them. 
Mrs. Speer is a daughter of Mr. and 
Mrs. Ernest Palmer, and a member 
of a little coterie of society maids 
who have all married into the army. 
She and her handsome brunette sis- 
ter. Evelyn, have been much ad- 

(Continued on page 11) 



MRS. SARAH CECILIA CRANE 

Emmanuel Practitioner 
Hours 10 to 4 
1152 Divisadero St., near Geary St. 
Phone Fillmore 3929 



To visit San Francisco without seo- 

.\ inlrews ' Diamond Palace would 

be like visiting Europe without seeing 

Parie. It is a Leading feature of Ban 

FraneiBCO, a marvel of beauty and ele- 

, ami is unquestionably tbe djobI 

gnificeut jewelry Btore in the world. 

Visitors and residents are cordially in- 
vited to examine the marvels of genius 
at r,i< Kearny Street. Established 1850. 
Open 8 a. m. to 5:30 p. in. 



Phone Kearny 2578 




FOR EXCLUSIVE CUSTOM MADE 
SUITS AND GOWNS 



165 POST STREET SAN FRANCISCO 



\\\\\\\\\\\\\/ 



/ 



Phone Franklin 5062 



/ 



t MRS. F. W. WOOD "i 



/ 



' 



/ 



Formerly F. Gerard of New York 



' 



(i Sowns and S3 1 o u s e s % 

/ For Sale and Made to Order ' 

/ 476 OFARRELL STREET '/■ 

y SAN FRANCISCO / 

/ \ \\ \ \\ \\ \ \ \ \ N 



Love Grown Cold 

Piling of a suit for divorce by 
Mrs. Charles Purcell a few days ago 
was of interest to society on both 
sides of the bay. However they 
were not entirely unprepared for 
the news as rumors of domestic in- 
felicity had been rampant for some 
time. Mrs. Parcells, who is a hand- 
some brunette, young woman, was 
formerly Elsie Kimble, and is a sis- 
ter of Fred Kimble, who married 
Helen Thomas, sister to that stun- 
ning young matron, Mrs. Latham 
McMullin, and to Gertrude Thomas 
one of last season's most feted de- 
butantes. Mrs. Parcells is also a 
sister of Mrs. Joe Chanslor, who 
was beautiful Hattie Kimble, wife of 
the wealthy oil operator and the 
Chanslors are leaders in San Fran- 
cisco's smart set. Mrs. Chanslor's 
lor's entertainments, particularly 
her bridge parties, where $50 prizes 
were fought for by heated and ex- 
cited members of the smart set, de- 
cided a pace which society found 
hard to keep up with. Charlie Par- 
cell was Beau Brummel of his class 
in the University of California in 
the early '90's and his marriage 
some fifteen years ago to Miss Kim- 
ble was a genuine love match. How 
be it, love seems to have grown cold 
as the filing of the divorce suit cer- 
tifies. 

* * * # 

He's Coming Back 

At last the explanation is forth- 
coming as to why pretty Mrs. 
George H. Speer, the pormer petite 
and vivacious Miss Dorothy Palmer, 
failed to accompany her good look- 
ing young husband, Lieut. Speer, on 
his journey to the Philippines, 
where he was ordered, and sailed 




SCHOOLS 




| PARENTS, ATTENTION! f 

i =1 

,§ IN selecting a Business College (•* 

*) j to which to send yoar boys a 

,§ or girls, you should rcmem- Iff 

*y ber that practically all the expert 5 

tS short-hand reporters of the State cj 

# advise you that Gallagher-Marsh a 

tS Short-Hand System is the best, ^ 

$* and you should therefore send a 

4 them to *& 

I Gallagher- Marsh I 

I Business College I 

V 1256 MARKET STBEBT a 

£ f 

^ which specializes on Short-Hand, <i 

& Typing and Book-Keeping. Day x> 

f) and Evening Classes. ^ 



EALDfS" 5 



RUSSIAN IMPERIAL 
SCHOOL OF DANCING 

VERONINE VESTOFF 
(Late associate o£ Pavlowa) 

The Imperial Russian 
Ballet School Maintained 
by the Czar of Russia for 
training children to dance, 
is famous throughout the 
world for having brought 
the art of dancing to a 
point of perfection not ap- 
proached in any other 
country. 

Veronine VestofE is the 
only accredited representa- 
tive of this school in the 
United States. 
Chateau Bohlig — Pine and 
Powell Sts., San Francisco, Cal. 



COLLEGE 



1215 Van Nets Avenue 
SAN FRANCISCO 



16th & San Pablo Ave. 
OAKLAND 



PUCKETT'S 
College of Dancing 

ASSEMBLY HALL, 1268 SUTTEE 
CLASSES: 

Beginners' Classes Mondays 

Classes and Socials .... Wednesdays 

TANGO CLASSES Thursdays 

Assemblies Fridays 

FOB PEIVATE LESSONS 
PHONE FBANKLIN 118 



THE KIKIAW STUDIOS 
OF MODERN DANCES 

Miss Claribel Kirby announces Mr. 
Gilbert Littlejohn has joined the teach- 
ing forces of this instituion. Private 
lessons or class instruction by appoint- 
ment only. Tea and refreshments if 
desired. 

435 Powell Street, 

Third Floor 

Telephone Sutter 2105 

Instructions given with improved 

methods — Fox Trot, Lulu Fado, One 

Step, Hesitation, Tango, Maxixe and all 

the new dances. 



A. MAHR B. M1ECZKOWSKI 

Gradual.:-* of the Imperial School 

Russian Dancing School 

Imperial Method Taught 
1509 Gough Street, S. F. 

Telephone West 493S 



THE WASP 



Saturday, January 30, 1915 



cZfeWASP 

The Pacific Coast Weekly 



Published weekly by 

THE WASP PUBLISHING COMPANY (Inc.) 

49 GEAET ST., SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 
Phone, Doug-las 1871 

MARTIAL DAVOUST - - - - Managing Editor 

PAUL GWYNNE ------------ Editor 

GLENN H. JOHNSON ---- Associate Editor 

GERALD C. HALSEY ---------- Attorney 

SUBSCRIPTION — In the United States, Canada, and Mexico, $5 a year in advance. 
Entered at the San Prancisco Postnffice as second-class matter. 



The Wasp will gladly publish notices of social events and other 
items of interest to its readers. Manuscripts should be at this office 
not later than Wednesday morning of the week's issue. 



Why do Americans demand a happy ending? Are we such deli- 
cate creatures that we cannot stand a tragedy? Such is the question 
of Miss Bertha Mann, leading woman of "To-day," the play with 
a tragic climax. Not delicate creatures exactly. Miss Mann, but 
too fond altogether of ham-and-egg prosperity. We are all right, 
of course, but rather lacking in sting. An ideal is merely a point 
of view with most of us. We haven't suffered enough to know the 
heart of chivalry, to find the soul of romance, or the length of regret. 
As a people we are lacking in that deepest chord of music, but we 
the young and will eventually find ourselves. 
****** 

In the rush of our charity let us not forget the Poles. They are 
a wonderful people who have suffered much, and at the present time 
their plight is as bad or worse than Belgium. It does not matter 
that Poland is farther away. In the sense of geography that means 
it is colder. And the Poles at the most never had much. But in 
their hearts and in their heads they have always carried a great 
deal. Their history is, perhaps, the most wonderful of Europe. Their 
women are undoubtedly the most beautiful in the world. In art 
and letters and everything worth while they have always been a 
facile and brilliant race. Do not forget them when you give. 

***** 

Great Britain's reply to the protest of the permanent counsel of 
our State Department concerning the searching of American ships 
for contraband of war is more than friendly in tone — it is fraternal. 
Secretary Gray concedes most of the points of law in our protest and 
promises that the most extreme care shall be taken not to violate any 
international agreement. As this reply is merely preliminary, we 
must wait for the complete answer before reviewing the matters at 
issue. But the incident is virtually closed by Sir Edward's tact and 
sincerity. Anyone who tries to foment trouble between the United 
States and Great Britain — and I refer particularly to the hot-headed 
Irishmen who are blathering about former British tyranny — violates 
the neutrality law and is guilty of constructive treason. 
***** 

The proposed nose-spectacled and altogether puritan abatement 
act which in milady's parlor and in the clubs will do forever away 
with bridge, solo, poker, pinochle, and the dozen others manipulated 
for the pleasant exchange of change, is the principal product of 
Assemblyman M. B. Browne of Tuolumne. That it eould not have 
been conceived anywhere else is evident. An'd like all other people 
who come from Tuolumne the gentleman is very much in earnest. 
It seems, however, that if eyes are bright enough he can be lured 
into a quiet game of poker without being drugged. It is understood 
that such a game occurred in a certain hotel in Sacramento. Brown 
sat opposite a beautiful woman who was the wife of a Senator he 
knew. "I cannot understand, Mr. Brown," teased the lady, "why 
you should want to do away with a quiet game of this kind. You 
seem to love it very much. You will have to face the music your- 
self, you know." 

"There are other things that I love and have to deny myself, 
yet face," responded Brown, with a lapse into truth. And Sacra- 
mento is whispering yet. 




MUSIC IN SAN FRANCISCO 
By Arthur Medina 

A Casual visitor to one ot San 
Francisco's places of musical 
entertainment, cabaret, the- 
atre, or popular concert, hears pro- 
grams of quite great quantity. But 
an examination of the kind of mu- 
ical food provided, reveals the fact 
that perhaps eighty per cent of it is 
of the tinkle-tinkle, tum-tum order. 
The deeper sentiments seem to be 
neglected for a kind of sensual lilt 
and swing which has its undoubt- 
ed appeal, but does not carry with 
it the quality which causes a 
"lump in the throat," like so many 
of the old simple sonds of ante-bel- 
lum days. 

To illustrate, I will relate the ex- 
perience of a friend and myself, who, 
some time ago, in the search for 
amusement, bought tickets for a va- 
riety show at a theatre on Market 
street. 

The program was made up of mo- 
nologue artists, acrobatic perform- 
ers, clapstick comedians and eccen- 
tric dancers, and one lone singer of 
ballads and songs of sentiment. 

The drop used for the latter act 
presented a street with a beer sign 
of much prominence. This and the 
spotlight comprised the accessories. 
The singer appeared from the 
wings in a white dress, walked 
slowly to the center of the stage, 
and began singing an old time 
Irish ballad. After her first phrase 
the house was dead still, and gave 
her its undivided attention to the 
end of the selection. Applause 
shook the building. She had taken 
them by surprise, but when they 
tame to, they would not let her go. 
She was the hit of the show, and 
nearly caused a riot. Altogether, 
she sang five times, and had to 
make a little speech to get away 
from them. The other acts had been 
received with little favor. 

This goes to show the real appeal 
of the songs, in spite of the fact 
that people do not respond to them 
as often as they should. In the de- 
sire for novelty they will sit 
through a long session of dreary 
monotonous slap-stick comedy and 
sickly sentimental musical hog- 
wash, which palls on them almost 
as fast as they hear it. But the 
Spartan simplicity and wholesome 
beauty of the older music is lost 
unless in some psychological in- 
stance like the one just referred to, 
it gets beneath the surface, a shot 
to the heart. 

The growth of the present day 
music seems to have started when 
Charles K. Harris of Milwaukee, 
wrote "After the Ball," following it 
up with temporary successes like 
"Cast Aside," 'Tallen by the Way- 
side," and several others which 
earned enormous profits for him. 
Many of his songs, he says, were 
suggested by the dramas then ap- 
pearing on the stage. "Secret Ser- 
vice," "Held by the Enemy," and 
other military dramas of the time 
called for "Just Break the News to 
Mother," "Tell Her That I Loved 
Her Too," and others which I have 
forgotten. They are all said to have 



been enormously profitable to him. 

The majority of these popular 
crazes are now relegated to the mus- 
ical ashheap. But in the last thir- 
ty years hundreds of popular hits 
have been written by men like H. 
W. Petrie, who wrote "I Don't Want 
to Play in Your Yard," and Chas. 
Graham, who made a small fortune 
from "Two Little Girls in Blue." 
None of these hits held the popu- 
lar favor long. Some of them died 
almost overnight, as it were. And 
now a shower of musical numbers 
is thrust on the public every month, 
nearly all of it automatic in con- 
struction and silly in ideas. 

And amidst all this tinsel struct- 
ure the grand old songs try to hold 
their own, like Napoleon's Old 
Guard, realizing, one may say, their 
defeat, but bound to come up 
again, like doughty champions to 
make their old irresistable appeal 
to the heart. 

Ragtime has an attraction for all 
of us which, on the surface, is pow- 
erful, but apply to it the test of re- 
petition, and in no time the new 
melody, the new combination of 
simple phrases, has fallen flat and 
the tune has become threadbare. 
This is not true of the music which 
appeals to our sentiments. It can 
be repeated and repeated, and we 
get new joy from every rendition. 
How often we hear people say "At 
one time I did not like 'The Lucia 
Sextette,' for instance, or "The Tann- 
hauser March,' but since I have 
heard it played at such and such a 
place, I have loved it." 

And of popular tunes, one says: 
"Heavens, there is that old thing 
again: won't they ever stop playing 
it." 

Lest readers may fall into the er- 
ror of thinking that I condemn all 
popular music as worthless, I has- 
ten to correct them with the state- 
ment, that though most of it is 
lacking woefully in he elements of 
true melody, it has the question- 
able value of appealing almost en- 
tirely to the senses. 






Isaac Upham Again 
A divorce suit is being heard in 
San Francisco which promises to be 
more interesting in its aftermath 
than in the mere merits of the case, 
for the majority of people are won- 
dering just how far-reaching the 
testimony will be. Three prominent 
men about town have incurred the 
displeasure of the doctor husband, 
who sues on the ground of cruelty 
and names them as accessories, for 
their attention to his dear wife 
caused him the anguish that he 
seeks to have assuaged. It was not 
exactly the New Year greeting that 
Ike Upham would have chosen for 
himself upon his return from his 
war-interrupted, aroundthe-world 
voyage, but it was what he got, nev- 
ertheless, along with Lieutenant Ed- 
ward W. Mclntyre, U. S. N. (retired) 
and Captain H. B. Casey, of the 
Army. One is not so much surpris- 
ed at Isaac Upham figuring in an- 
other divorce ease, for not only has 
he already had one of his own, but 
he received prominent mention 



Saturday January 30, 1915 



THE WASP 



when the beautiful young Russian, 
Olga Tehemovich, to whom he was 
engaged, committed suieide a cou- 
ple of years ago. But, knowing the 
sentiments of the present heads of 
the Administration, people are con- 
jecturing aa to whether the case 
will be taken cognizance ol in Wash- 
ington ;t r i < I a reprimand adminis- 
tered to the young officer who has 
shown his indiscretion hy atten- 
tions to a married woman. Mcln- 
tyre bae been one of the well-known 
figures around the Bohemian Club, 
and for a time was one of Mrs. 
Eleanor Martin's favorite proteges 
X. V. Town Topics. 



COTTON BEGINS TO MOVE 

Direct shipments to Germany have 
been demonstrated to be a success. 
interests behind a number of recent 
sailings of American cotton laden 
ships announced yesterday that 
three of the ships have arrved safely 
at Bremen. 

The ships are the El Monte, the 
Greenbrier and the Carolyn. Cables 
telling of the safe arrival of the latt- 
er two were received by the New 
York agents. 

The three successful voyages are re 
garded as a convincing demonstra- 
tion of the good faith of Great Brit- 
ain in permitting American ships 
carrying cotton to proceed without 
molestation, according to agree- 
ment. 

As a result of the safe arrivals 
of these ships it is believed that a 
steady stream of cotton will now 
go to Germany, to the advantage 
to cotton growers and traders in 
this country. A prominent ship- 
ping man estimated that 100,000 
bales of cotton have already been 
received in Germany, either direct- 
ly or through the Netherlands, Den- 
mark and Italy. 

A direct effect of the success of the 
cotton ships is likely to be an eas- 
ing of insurance rates on further 
shipments. Private underwriters 
probably will now begin to accept 
war cotton risks, the Federal insur- 
ance bureau having carried all of 
this insurance up to this time. The 
Federal rate also, it is thought, will 
be reduced. 

At least seven vessels are now 
loading with cotton at American 
ports for Germany. The Margaret, 
formerly the Dacia of the Hamburg- 
American line, now under American 
registry, is loading under the pe- 
culiar circumstances of not knowing 
whether it will be allowed to pro- 
ceed to Germany or not. The Fed- 
eral war risk insurance bureau has 
refused to accept war risk insurance 
on it, in fear of seizure by the allies 
as a German ship. Cotton ship- 
ers are making a strenuous fight to 
have the government insist on priv- 
eleges which American registry 
should give it. 

-X- * * * # 

The Groom — ladies and gentle- 
men! Friends all! Directly after the 
ceremony I will auction off the pres- 
ents! We need the money! Now is 
your opportunity to get silverware, 
cut-glass and bric-a-brac cheap for 
cash! 



The Self-Elected Great 

(Continued from Page 3) 

J. I Taussig, arch-director on the Exposition, is a very strung per- 
sonal friend of Matthews. Neuhaus is likewise a close ally of Benja- 
min I>le Wheeler, who boasts an acquaintance with the Kaiser 
fprobably to the extent of a "good-morning" sometime.) McComaa 

.named into a well-known local family, and. it is said, has pulled 
wires on that account with good results. Consequently John Trask 

may have had meekness thrust upon him. 

We might illustrate with a little story which is going the rounds 
regarding Mathews' mural. On the very best authority we are in- 
formed that Jules Guerin rejected this work but that Taussig told 
him it must be accepted. 

To our minds, and it can be said of them all. the three gentlemen, 
self-elected as judges, paint fairly well, but several skies below 
genius. Outside of their own environment any one of them could be 
called Smith, so far as real recognizance goes. Nevertheless, we 
understand, that MeComas will have a gallery at the Exposition all to 
himself and will exhibit in total no more than twenty pictures, unless, 
it may be, that lie thinks of others; that Matthews will perpetuate 
himself likewise with paintings which are still in his studio, and 
that Neuhaus will hang at least half a dozen. 

Considering that at exhibitions abroad it is the custom to hang 
no more than two or three, or. at the very most, four of the greatest 
living artists, we are compelled to point out the rank modesty of 
these gentlemen in withholding from us more of their work. They 
might have made a collection of their entire output from the begin- 
ning. 

Meanwhile they have rejected the work of Arthur Beekwith, 
whose "Dawn" submitted was a marvel of beauty; of Charles Grant, 
the greatest marine artist on the Coast; Richard Partington, who 
may have something to say ; Theodore Wores, who has said consider- 
able already; Carl Jonovold, and (we hear) Martinez; L. P. Lattimer, 
and Evelyn Withrow (the latter was art curator of the Pair at 
Seattle and has had works accepted by the Royal Academy of Lon- 
don) ; A. W. Best (Mrs. Best did not send) ; J. Rophuro, a French 
painter of animals par excellence, and Lazar, the Belgian portrait 
artist. Also fifty others that you know and whom we have not space 
to mention. Peters, Dickman, C. D. Robinson and John A. Stanton 
did not send. Harry Seawell had one accepted, a small interior. 

To all of these artists The Wasp would suggest that they compel an 
exhibition in the California building, and failing in that, some person 
of wealth and artistic taste in San Francisco should come to their 
assistance with the loan of a building or some other place in which 
they could exhibt their paintings throughout the Fair. 



Nobody Home 

With forty-two pearls of a spark- 
line necklace lost between the ferry 
and Laguna street, Mrs. Washing- 
ton Dodge has been muchly wor- 
ried. Birds, or street gamin, or any- 
one with an eye for small circumfer- 
enecc, may have digested those 
pearls, so becoming on the lady. A 
friend came to her, a gentleman be- 
longing to her especial coterie, and 
related having seen a newsboy with 
a pearl. He had been, moreover, a 
very wise newsboy, for he had run 
quickly from the gentleman's pres- 
ence. 



"How can we identify him?" ask- 
ed Mrs. Dodge, excitedly. 

The gentleman considered serious- 
ly for a moment. "We might iden- 
tify him by the pearl," he conclud- 
ed, sagely. 



Absent 
I heard a cry in the night, 

A thousand miles it came, 
Swift as a flash of light, 

My name, my name! 

It was your voice I heard, 
You waked and loved me so, 

I send you back this word, 
"I know, beloved, I know." 





A New Type of Lawyer 
The younger generation of law 

vers in San Francisco arc getting 
away Iroio the idea that tin' law is 
a game with all the odds in favor 
of the man with the money. Gerald 

C. Halsey is an example of this type. 

He is unfettered by time-worn tra- 
ditions. Ilis is a refreshing person- 
ality, a believer in the fact that 
right is right and wrong is wrong. 
Convinced that Ills cause his just. 
Halsey makes straight for the mark, 
and it is an unusual thing that can 
keeji him from getting what he goes 
after. 

It was these qualities that led to 
bis being named as the attorney 
for "The Wasp," for his aggressive- 
ness and recognized ability are fac- 
tors that will carry him any place 
he desires to go. Halsey has a 
strong personality, is exceptionally 
well versed in the letter of the law, 
and altogether is finely equipped 
for the responsibilities of his posi- 
tion. Those who know Halsey and 
his work predict a brilliant future 
for him. 



The editorial and business offices 
of The Wasp have been moved to 
The Bankers Investment Building, 
49 Geary Street. The telephone num- 
ber has been changed to Douglas 
1871. 



Mme. Mariette Corsets 

Women with a love for fine un- 
dergarments will be delighted with 
the finished workmanship and ex- 
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They are designed by French 
artists for American women. 

Freedom of motion and natural- 
ness of pose are the present re- 
quirements in corsetry. The light- 
ness and flexibility of the Mme. 
Mariette corsets, the low bust ef- 
fects, secure the utmost mobility 
to the wearer. 

Let our expert corsetieres show 
you the charming new Mme. Ma- 
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Prices $5.00 to $25.00. 

D. SAMUELS 

THE LACE HOUSE 

N. W. Cor. Stockton and O'Farrell 



♦ Established 1868. 



Goldstein & Co. 

Official Costumers 
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stove 2. Cor. Haight St. and Masonic Ave. 
Store 3, Cor Sacramento St. and Presidio 

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Store Z, 84 Post Street, east of Kearny 
Store 5, Cor. Carl and Cole Streets 
Store 6, Cor. Union and Steiner Streets 
Store 7. Cor. Powell and Sutter Streets 



THE WASP 



Saturday, January 30, 1915 



THE WOMAN BEAUTIFUL 




By Catharine Carroll 

In most cases where a female af- 
finity figures, the wife avers that 
while she and her husband were 
poor and working with the same 
desire to better their fortunes they 
were happy. But after the fortune 
was accumulated the husband seem- 
ed to tire of her. 

# * ->:- * 

Mrs. Corey, the first wife of the 
former President of the United 
States Steel Corporation, married 
Corey when he was a "puddler," 
earning forty dollars a month in 
the steel mills in Pittsburgh. 

Mrs. Corey declared that until 
the rise in the fortunes of Mr. Corey 
came they were ideally happy. 

# * a # 

Mrs. Corey divorced her husband 
and he married immediately May- 
belle Gilman, the actress. The sec- 
ond Mrs. Corey resides in Prance, 
while Mr. 'Corey remains most of the 
time in America. One occasionally 
sees a notice in a paper that Mr. 
Corey has sailed for Europe to 
make a short stay. 

Several years ago Mr. Corey broke 
his leg. In passing Sherry's, on 
Fifth avenue, where Mr. Corey main- 
tains his apartments, I saw him 
limping out to his car, attended 
only by his servant. 

He appeared like a man broken 
and old far beyond his years; and 
bore but slight resemblance to the 
triumphant bridegroom of Maybelle 
Gilman, the actress. 

There he was — rich, ill, and alone 
— and his wife in Prance! 

-X- # # # 

I wonder if while lying there ill 
and alone he ever thought of the 
wife of "his youth, whom he so 
lightly discarded, of their little 
home and the baby boy who was 
the center of it. 

# # * * 

In a divorce suit here in San Fran- 
cisco last week, the wife testified 
that while her husband was earn- 
ing but fifteen dollars a week they 
were perfectly happy. But after 
the husband inherited a fortune 
he soon found an affinity among 
his employees. 

<£ 8 

m Telephone Douglas 57! 2 If 

I I 

| Jackson & Merwin § 

l EXCLUSIVE | 



Some women, knowing the weak 
side of a man is his vanity, play 
upon this; and when they are 
brought into daily contact with 
him such women, through flattery, 
propinquity and natural sex attrac- 
tion, beguile the poor imbecile of 
a man into believing that she loves 
him for himself alone. 

If the man would only stop long 
enough to take a double hitch on 
common sense he would see that 
the girl had no love for him but 
was after the mighty dollar, solely 
and entirely; and had probably 
been the affinity of every employer 
she ever had who was willing to 
have her play that role. 

The "Affinity," or "Love Pirate," 
type of woman is not confined to 
any one particular class of society, 
but flourishes in all; and is the 
result of man's vanity and woman's 
avariciousness. 

-X- * -X- * 

Some especially charitable people 
make excuses. Jfor the unfaithful 
husband when he deserts his wife 
for a younger woman by saying: 
"Well, perhaps his wife did not 
keep pace with him or progress." 
When a woman does housework, 
stays up at night nursing babies, 
she has little time for much else. 

But I have observed that such 
women grow beautiful in character 
and soul and acquire all the es- 
sential graces. While the man who 
deserts her has acquired nothing 
but money. He never had any soul, 
heart or character to develop. 

•X- -X- * -X- 

Nobody can decry the value of 
having a little money, but when at 
the end of life we sum up all our 
blessings we find that the things 
that money can buy are not the 
ones that have been most import- 
ant in our lives or have brought 
us the most happiness. 



I jfccommodattons for ^7/en m 

f 78 GEARY STREET § 

S San Francisco g» 



They Always Come Back 

With the sensational charges of 
dual life brought against the Rev. 
Arthur Maxson Smith, of Berkeley, 
in close sequel to the scandal sur- 
rounding the Rev. R. A. M. Browne, 
a shocked and startled populace 
settled down this week to a discus- 
sion of one peculiar similarity in 
both cases — each pastor eventually 
forsook his affinity. 

Both the Rev. Browne and the 
Rev. Smith were lured away from 
loving wives and comfortable 
homes. They turned deaf ears to 
the dictates of their consciences 
and deserted their homes for soul- 
mates. 

Yet, in each case, the love that 
drew them from their firesides was 
not strong enough to keep them 
away. The Rev. Browne left his 
soulmate, Mrs. Hendricks, explain- 
ing that he thought it best for 
them to part. The Rev. Smith did 
the same, if his wife's charges are 
true, though the love he is said to 
have harbored for a pretty young 
nurse is declared to have drawn 
him from the path of righteousness 
which he admonished others to fol- 
low. 

Indeed, love's flame must flicker. 




A picture of "September Morn" 
and the quick wit of Judge Prank 
H. Kerrigan combined to throw a 
deep blush over the features of At- 
torney Harry Eickhoff at a Cosmos 
Club dinner jinks a few nights ago. 

Pun and jest were in the air. Puns 
were cracked by diners at the ex- 
pense of others. The sound of 
laughter filled the room. It was a 
gay affair. 

At the conclusion of the meal, 
souvenirs were passed about. Judge 
Kerrigan, presiding as master of 
toasts and fun, combined, called on 
each member to tell what sort of 
souvenir had come his way. 

Eickhoff, in turn, announced that 
a picture of the chilled lady had 
fallen to his lot. 

"That's a pretty expression on her 
face," said Judge Kerrigan, laugh- 
ing. "Isn't it, Harry?" 

"I haven' looked at her face that 
closely," retorted the lawyer, seek- 
ing to stop all fun at his expense. 

"You haven't, eh," shot back the 
Judge; "well, what have you been 
looking at then?" 

But Eickhoff only blushed. 

-X- -X- -X * 

An address by Rabbi Jacob Nieto 
on "When Thoughts Will Soar" was 
a feature of the regular meeting of 
the Philomath Club, which took 
place Monday afternoon at 536 Sut- 
ter street. 

Vocal solos by Cantor Reuben R. 
Rinder and violin selections by Al- 
bert Rosenthal added to the pleas- 
ure of the affair. Mrs. David Hen- 
derson, president of the club, pre- 
sided. The entertainment was in 
charge of Mrs. S. S. Kahn. 

•X- # # * 

The performance by the Players' 
Club, which toc\k place Tuesday 
evening at Scottish Rite Hall for 
the benefit of the Happy Day 
Home, proved a big success socially 
as well as financially. There was a 
large attendance, and as a result a 
goodly sum was netted for the bene- 
ficiary institution. 

The play produced was one of the 
latest works of George Bernard 
Shaw, "Fanny's First Play." The 
cast was especially strong and the 
players displayed tmusual ability. 

The Happy Day Home, which ben- 
efited by the performance, was 
founded to care for young children 
of working women who are forced 
to remain away from home during 
the day to earn their livelihood. 

-X- * * * 

Invitations are out for a dansant 
to be given by the dramatic section 
of the Papyrus Club Saturday even- 
ing at 90 Devisadero street. Elabo- 
rate arrangements have been made 
by the committee in charge and an 



exceptionally good time is expected. 
Supervisor J. Emmet Hayden will 
lecture under the auspices of the 
Club's travel section Thursday even- 
ing, February 4, at the clubrooms, 
430 Sutter street. His subject will 
be "Continental Europe and the 
British Isles." The lecture will be 
illustrated with stereopticon views. 
* # # * 

The Corona Club observed "Civic 
Day" at its meeting Thursday even- 
ing with a lecture by the Rev. Jo- 
siah Sibley. His subject was "The 
Slavs Through Ten Centuries." 

Miss H. Ebert was heard in cello 
solos, with Mrs. W. H. Banks at 
the piano. 

-x- # # # 

George Randolph Chester, the 
celebrated short-story writer, was 
entertained at luncheon at the 
Press Club Sunday. Several score 
members gathered to to honor the 
distinguished guest. 

Costly furniture arrived this week 
for the reception headquarters to 
be maintained by the Press Club in 
the Press Building on the Exposi- 
tion grounds, where visiting news- 
paper men are to be received. One 
shipment, valued at $2,000, is the 
gift of Stickley Brothers of Grand 
Rapids, while a gift of similar value 
is presented by R. A. Crothers. The 
furniture was obtained through 
the reception committee of the Club, 
of which Waldemar de Bille is act- 
ing chairman. 



PATRICK & CO. 

RUBBER STAMPS 

STENCILS 
SEALS 
BADGES 
SIGNS, ETC. 
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P. V. Matraia, 
President 



Julius Fppstein 
Secretary 



j4rt floral Company 

Incorporated 

HOTEL ST. FRANCIS 

225 POWELL ST., SAN FRANCISCO 

Tel. Kearny 3524 and Sutler 1372 




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Saturday January 30, 1915 



THE WASP 



9 




By John C. Observer. 



Those Golden School Days 

And now comes the day of par- 
ental precaution against school- 
room romance. Cupid with minia- 
ture shafts intended lor youthful 
hearts lias been chased out of the 
classroom by unromantie papas. 
Knickerbockered young Lochinvars 
have been dealth a hard blow. 
"Puppy love" has been shattered in 
the Grant School in Pacific Avenue. 

It all started a few days ago when 
the large enrollment at that school 
necessitated the placing of double 
Seats in front of each desk in the 
Classroom. Thus was space saved 
and the seating of the crowded 
classes was rearranged. 

With co-education and woman 
suffrage both established institu- 
tions in California, little heed was 
paid to the pairing of the youthful 
students. Boys and girls were seat- 
ed together at the double desks, to 
the joy of some and the chagrin of 
others. 

Boy and girl sweethearts of the 
classroom found the new seating ar- 
rangement delightful. Other coup- 
les were less well pleased. Some of 
the lads were "shamed" by their 
fellows for sitting with gingham- 
dressed companions. The situation 
■ was exciting to say the least. 

That night half a hundred boys 
'and girls innocently spoke of the 
innovation at their dinners tables. 
Some papas laughed and others 
i frowned. Some merely scowled and 
others banged fists iritably upon 
the table. 

Next day saw several parents at 
the school. Protests flew thick and 
fast. "Co-education be hanged," was 
the conceusus of their opinion. 
"College days come soon enough," 
they declared. 

And half an hour later seating ar- 
rangements were changed — boys sat 
with boys and girls with girls. 

•X- # * # 

Honors for the Famious 

Even newspaper men sometimes 
have their day. Usually it is a long 
time coming, but occasionally it 
does come. And soon the scribes, 
the every-day, plodding, garden va- 
riety of news gatherers, are to have 
their chance at the real celebrities 
of American journalism, the money- 
ed writers and publishers of the 
country. 

To present that chance to the 
newspaper men, the Press Club has 
given birth to a secret fraternity. 



The famous ones will be offered 
membership while they are in San 
Francisco visiting the Exposition. 
And the initiation— the secret of it 
all—is to be managed, conducted, 
planned, and perpetrated by the 
boys of the newspaper shops them- 
selves. 

The secret society has been ap- 
propriately named "The Sacred Or- 
der of the Black Cat," for a jet-black 
feline for years has been the mascot 
of the Club. 

Membership will be the reward 
for those who withstand the trials 
of initiation and as only writers 
and publishers of actual fame will 
be eligible, it is expected that the 
"Order" eventually will be much 
sought after. 

When a newspaper publisher, fa- 
mous short-story writer, or cele- 
brated novelist comes to town, he 
will be considered for membership 
in the new fraternity. If the Club 
is agreeable to his name, he will be 
invited to dinner and royally treat- 
ed. After the meal the initiation 
will begin. 

The candidate will he made to 
stand in the center of the room. 
About him will gather the news- 
paper men, the everyday kind be- 
fore mentioned. For one-half hour 
the candidate will be jeered and 
roasted, "panned" and jabbed. 
Verbal attacks, personal and other- 
wise, will be slung with merciless 
force at the candidate. All that 
newspaper men pounding out col- 
umns of news by day and night 
against the tick of the clock can 
think of to say about the moneyed 
publishers and the 25-eent-a-word 
writers will be said. 



And if, after thirty minutes of 
such onslaught, the candidate 
wears a smiling face, "The Order of 
the Black Cat" will be conferred 
upon him, and he will be presented 
with a costly gold emblem. 

"Good fellowship is what we must 
promote," said a club member, ex- 
plaining the plan. 



Rolph's Junket Curtailed 

Being mayor of a great city has 
its pleasures and its advantages. 
Also it has its drawbacks, and that 
is why Mayor Rolph, at a recent 
meeting of the Board of Supervis- 
ors, secured permission to leave the 
State at any time he chose. 

One expreience had brought the 
Mayor face to face with the disad- 
vantages of guiding the destinies 
of a metropolis, and being of a pre- 
cautious disposition, he chose to 
safeguard himself against similar 
occurrences. 

It appears that when the Mayor 
left San Francisco with a party to 
attend the opening of the San Diego 
Exposition, he had no intention of 
going further south and saw no rea- 
son, therefore, why arrangements 
for an extended trip should be 
made. 

A pleasant stay was enjoyed at 
San Diego and preparations were 
made for the return. But at the 
eleventh hour a flying jaunt to Tia 
Juana was proposed by several 
members of the party. It was a 
pleasant suggestion and met with 
unanimous approval. 

All were happy with the prospect 
of a glimpse of Old Mexico, until 
Mayor Rolph suddenly recalled an 




obscure provision of the city char- 
ter which forbids the chief executive 
of the city to leave the state with- 
out permission from the Board of 
Supervisors. 

So Rolph was obliged to with- 
draw from his party and return to 
San Francisco. Nothing was known 
about his disappointment until he 
asked the Supervisors, at a conven- 
ient moment, for permission to 
leave California, explaining that he 
might some day want to take an- 
other Hying trip to the San Diego 
celebration and perhaps then 
would want to take a peep into 
Mexico, 



She Had 'Em "Tailor-made" 

"books certainly are often decep- 
tive," mused Gil Berry, local news- 
paper man, as he settled down to 
his desk in the press room of the 
City Hall the other day. 

Berry had just returned from 
lunch— newspaper men never can 
afford luncheon— and the boys 
gathered about him to learn the 
reason for his sudden soliloquy. "It 
was the surprise of my life," he con- 
tinued, as though the bunch knew 
of what he was talking. 

"Well, I'll tell you all about it," 
he finally exclaimed. "It was one 
on me. 

"I just went to that cafeteria 
down street for a bite of lunch 
while the 'beat' was clear. I was 
eating alone at my table when I 
espied an elderly woman sitting at 
a table opposite, staring at me. 

"She had a horrible scowl on her 
face. Her glasses rested far down 
over her nose and a look that be- 
spoke contempt was over her face. 

" 'She's a reformer, sure,' I said to 
myself, for you could see reform 
written all over her features. 

"When I finished eating I pulled 
out my Durham and started rolling 
one. I was sure there'd be a fuss 
coming from her direction. She 
looked at me with such eyes and 
there was such a frown on her 
face, I was waiting for her to call 
over to me not to smoke in the 
presence of ladies. 

"But I was wrong. As soon as I 
had lighted my pill, she called over, 
'Now that isn't fair,' and a smile 
broke over her face. 

" 'Do you want the makin's?' I 
asked, holding out my papers. 

" 'No, thank you,' she answered, 
opening her purse and taking out 
a box of good cigarettes. 1 have 'em, 
but it isn't fair to let men smoke 
here and not ladies'." 



Sultan Turkish Baths 



624 POST STREET 

Special Department for Ladies 

Open Day and Night for Ladies and 
Gentlemen. 

Al. Johnson, formerly of Sutter Street 
Hammam has leased the Sultan Turkish 
Balhs. where he will be glad to see his 
old and new customers. 



10 



THE WASP 



Saturday, January 30, 1915 




And Yet 

What have you to remember, 

What have I forgot? 
Laughter, jests, and trifling, 

Lilies with dewdrops wet. 

Which of us was in earnest. 

Which of us was in jest, 
When the lilies, breathing fragrance 

Died slowly on your breast? 

There's nothing to remember, 
There's nothing to forget, 

But laughter, jest, and trifling, 
And yet; — and yet — and yet! 



A Real Aristocrat 

Mrs. Mary Lord Harrison, widow 
of the late ex-Presirent, is in New 
York this winter, but lives so quiet- 
ly that hardly anyone is aware of 
her presence. She is there with her 
young daughter, Elizabeth, who 
will be graduated from Westover 
next June. Mrs.| Harrison is deeply 
interested in music and art, and 
Elizabeth, who is old for her age, 
having been a constant companion 
to her mother, and, when most chil- 
dren were enjoying childish amuse- 
ment, was listening to grand opera, 
inherits the artistic taste. Although 
Mrs. Harrison has been a widow 
many years, she has never discarded 
her mourning. 

# # * * 

S. F. Women May Do This 

A suffragist election in much the 
same fashion as those held by the 
great political parties, and having 
for its object the selection of lead- 
ers and organization officers, took 
place in every assembly district of 
Greater New York. More than 135,- 
000 men and women, registered as 
adherents of the woman suffrage 
party, were invited to vote in their 
respective districts. Declaring that 
they were entering on the last stage 
of a campaign to gain the vote for 
women in the state, the suffragists 
chose their officers with a view to 
the forthcoming consideration of 
the suffrage question by the New 
York Legislature. Polling booths 
were situated in buildings of vary- 
ing kinds ranging from schools and 
stores to Fifth avenue residences. 
The ballots used were small, square, 
yellow ones on which blank spaces 
had been left for the names of a 
leader, vice-leader, recording secre- 
tary, corresponding secretary, and 
eighteen delegates from each district 
to the city convention to be held on 
Feb. 1. Many of the present leaders 
were re-elected. 



Canada's First Sacrifice 
The first officer of the Canadian 
contingent to be killed in action 
was Captain D. O. C. Newton, of 
Montreal. He went into the trenches 
with Princess Patricia's Light In- 
fantry, and was killed in a sharp 
engagement. 

# # # * 

President Coming 

The officers' quarters of the bat- 
tleship New York are being torn 
apart and made over to accommo- 
date the President, his daughter, 
Miss Margaret Wilson; his niece, 
Miss Helen Bones, and a woman 
friend; the Secretary of the Navy 
and his wife and the latter's sister. 
The party will sail on the battle- 
ship for San Francisco through the 
Panama Canal. 

When Raymond Dies 

Recently Raymond Hitchcock, at 
the Lambs' Club, expiated upon his 
contentment with things as they 
are. "There's only one thing more, 
boys," he said, "to assure my com- 
plete, happiness. When I am dead, 
T want you all to promise me that 
you will embalm me, whitewash me 
and set me up with the other stat- 
ues on the front of Amelia Bing- 
ham's house." 



The Love Story of Sallie 
Pretty little Sallie Williams, the 
daughter of Senator and Mrs. John 
Sharp Williams, is engaged to Lieu- 
tenant Joel William Bunkley, XJ. S. 
N, a handsome fellow and very 
much of a man. He has just finish- 
ed a tour of duty in Washington 
and it was while serving there that 
cupid got busy. Like most of the 
young naval officers in town, Bunk- 
ley had fluttered about the Burle- 
sons' candle for a while, and it look- 
ed as though Sydney Burleson was 
the chosen of his heart. It was Sal- 
lie all the time. 



She Will Grieve 

A varied and interesting person- 
ality was Valentine Blacque, who 
died last week in Paris, and the 
news will affect deeply a certain 
wealthy married woman of San 
Francisco. He came from a well- 
known New York family, but was 
of Turkish ancestry. One of his 
near relatives is Blacque Bey, sec- 
retary of the Turkish Embassy at 
Vienna. "Vale" Blacque, as he was 
known in New York, was a talent- 
ed man, but one who never accom- 
plished anything because his in- 
,come and position kept him from 
being a good professional, and he 
scorned to be a clever amateur. He 
was epigrammatic, witty, well read 
and a composer of no ordinary abil- 
ity. Several of his songs were pub- 
lished, and a mass for male voices, a 
more ambitious composition, had a 
hearing at the Church of St. Francis 
Xaviei' many years ago. But "Vale" 
Blacque will be better remembered 
as a raconteur, a beau, a man about 
town when there were men about 
town, and an amusing fellow. For 
some years he had made his home 
in France, occasionally visiting this 
country. He leaves a widow, who 
was Miss aKte Read, a sister of Mrs. 
William Oothout, the first wife of 
Edgar Saltus, the writer. 



His Wife On the Job 
Those in Chicago who betray a 
tender solicitude for their neigh- 
bors' affairs see in the recent resig- 
nation of Francis Judkin from ac- 
tive part in the legal matters of the 
Santa Fe a desire on the part of his 
wife, who is the widow of the late 
Richard T. Crane, to do a bit more 
traveling than she has been able to 
enjoy hitherto. She was averse to 
having her new husband keep his 
nose to the grindstone, especially 
when there were so many long, leis- 
urely jaunts about the country op- 
en for enjoyment. So Francis left 
the job he has held for twenty 
years or more and with his wife and 
her mother, Mrs. Hutchinson, is off 
to Daytona, Florida, for an indefi- 
nite stay. No one has anything but 
good to say of Mrs. Judkin. She 
was a most devoted wife to her el- 
derly spouse during his lifetime, 
waiting 'a year after his death be- 
fore marrying. She is at all times in- 
terested in struggling young musi- 
cians and more than one who has 
now arrived owes his or her success 
to Mrs. Judkin's generosity and 
patronage. 



That Mother of Elsie 
Among other things, Elsie Janis 
is justly famous for her clever moth- 
er (Mrs. Beerbauer), whose spark- 
ling wit and originality are respon- 
sible for the following classic, so it 
is said: "To a friend: "I want you 
to meet Mr. and Mrs. So and So. 
They are the loveliest people to 
know. They bow to you no matter 
with whom they happen to be!" 




The Oyster Loaf Buffet 

They speak of the popular Oyster 
Loaf Buffet, on Market street, as 
one of the three places in town 
where one is sure to meet everybody 
worth knowing. Around lunch time 
time they begin to congregate there. 
The reason is a twofold one; first, 
to take advantage of the excellent 
luncheon served by the Oyster Loaf, 
and again, to meet the friends and 
acquaintances. The Oyster Loaf is 
one of the most popular spots in 
the city. 




MEDICINAL MINERAL 

A Proven Natural Remedy for 

Rheumatism, Catarrh, Stomach Trouble 
Diabetes, Bright'* Disease. Piles 

Eczema, Ulcers, Poison Oak 

Sold by All Leading Druggists 



SOCIETY'S NEWEST 

Qkis is to let the reSers oftAe Wasp 
know about society's newest member— 

SAwtfyros'SPECIAL 
BRUSH-END Cigarettes 

Ultra-individual, and rather expensive. 
Niade entirely by han<$ and separately 
wrapped in silver Joil to preserve fresh- 
ness andjlavor. At clubs and 
the better stands' 2J)c. 



A SKIN OF BEAUTY IS A JOT 
FOREVEE 

DR. T. FELIX GOURAUD'S 

ORIENTAL CREAM 

Or Magical Beautlfler 

Removet l*n, Pim- 
pja. Freckle* Moth- 
FWhei. Rash and 
Skin Diseases, and 
every blemiih on 
beauty and dene* 
detection, lthaniood 
the tal of 65 yean 
no other has, end i* 
to harmless we taste 
it to be sure it is prop- 
perl y made. Accept 
no counieifeilof simi- 
lar name. The dii 
inguished Dr. L. A.Sayrea said to a lady of the haul' 
on (a patient) : ' 'As you ladies will use them, 1 recom- 
mend 'Couraud's Cream' as the least harmful of all the 
Skin preparations," 

For Sale by All Druggists and Fancy 
Goods Dealers. 

GOURAUD'S ORIENTAL TOILET 

POWDER 

For infants and adults. Exquisite!) 

perfumed. Relieves Skin Irritations, cure* 

Sunburn and renders an excellent complex 

ion. Price, 26 cents, by mail. 

GOURAUD'S POUDRE SUBTILE 
Removes Superfluous Hair. Price II, by 

Mail. 

FERD. T. HOPKTMS. Prop.. 87 drea 

Jonea St., New York City. 




THE 



3^a& 



Ampico Player Piano 
$ 1035 

Monthly Payments if Desired 
There can be but one best of any- 
thing — unquestionably the best in 
pianos is the world-famed Knabe. 

If you wish to regard only quality, 
then we present to you the Knabe 
' 'Arapicu" Player Piano. The 

' 'Ampico' ' Player combines the ut- 
most ease of pedaling and every re- 
finement of expression devices, in- 
cluding the marvelous Flexotone. The 
Knabe "Ampico" is especially con- 
structed for those who want the ab- 
solute best regardless of price. 

Your present Piano accepted as 
part payment. 



26 O'Farrell Street 

Oakland Store 473 12th Street 

Bacon Slock: 



Saturday January 30, l'Jlo 



THE WASP 



Ins and Outs of the Social World 



(Continued from papo 



mired at the numerous tea dan- 
Bants this winter as both excel in 
tlie terpsichorearj art. They are fre- 
Quently beaued by Ernest Wiltsee, 
who has made the two sisters mo- 
tifs for many enjoyable little enter- 
tainments. 

* * * * 

Three Drinks Only 

A pretty hornet's nest has Mr. 
.lames Woods, our debannair police 
commissioner and hotel manager, 
brought down upon his devoted 
head by the edict which he caused 
to be promulgated to the effect 
that three drinks and three only, is 
the amount of intoxicating liquor 
to be served to any of the fair pat- 
rons of the "Lounge", that attract- 
ive apartment in the St. Francis, 
where the smart set were wont to 
foregather of a late afternoon, to 
enjoy a few minutes rest from the 
arduous duties with dressmaker 
and milliner, and over a cocktail. 
a punch or a high-ball, discuss the 
latest society scandal, or the set of 
their best friends' gowns. The haut 
ton consider this odious dictum a 
direct reflection upon their manners 
and morals as it were, for only the 
smart set patronize the "Lounge" 
and what grand dame, stunning 
matron or beauteous debutante 
but would sniff at the idea of tak- 
ing three drinks, and if she did, of 
being any the worse for them? Non- 
sense and hoity-toity! Three drinks 
indeed! And no more! And for 
any mere man to say when she has 
had enough! No wonder there is 
anger in B'lingum and on Pacific 
Avenue! And just for that, the fair 
convivial ones are going to cut out 
Mr. James Woods and his old hotel. 
The St. Francisco Club is only a 
block further away, and there one 
may sip as many refreshing "Clov- 
er-Leafs" as one is a-minded to. So 
where's the nib, anyway? 

The Dodge Pearls 
Poor Mrs. Washington Dodge, 
who is minus the better part of a 
magnificent $4,000 string of pearls, 
which she lost on her way home 
from the ferry a few days ago, is 
receiving much sympathy from her 
friends. The necklace, an unusual- 
ly beautiful one was purchased in 
New York at Tiffany's and was 
much prized by its owner. The 
string numbered about 1,000 pearls. 
It was intact and in its place when 



N.Warshauer 



F.Warshauer 



Warshauer Brothers 

TAILORS 



49 Geary Street 

SAN FRANCISCO 



.Mis. Dodge left tli.' ferry, but when 
she reached her home, she found 
thi> cord had broken and less than 
half tin' jewels were found. .Mrs. 
Dodge and her husband are Ti- 
tanic survivors and r:i through 

thiit fearful experience with their 
little son in safety. She is a hand- 
some woman, who has had a de- 
cidedly Interesting career. The 
daughter of a Jewish rabbi, she 

made her home in London where 
she was a favorite in the set which 
numbered clever men and women 
as its members. She arrived in San 
Francisco some years ago when she 
was ".Mrs. Ruth Brown of London" 
and startled society at that time 
with daring hon mots. One re- 
mark which was credited to her was 
to the effect that she "had hus- 
bands with eyes to match the couor 
of her gowns." She is an aunt of 
the strenuous society matron Mrs. 
Robert Hayes Smith. 



Some Heart Wringings 
At last! At last! We are to 
know who really is "Who's Who" 
in San Francisco society, and the 
world at large has to thank the 
new Monday Night Club for having 
that little matter settled once and 
for all. But, oh, th« awful heart- 
burnings which are bound to re- 
sult when that fated list of 200 
names only is finally given to a 
waiting world !. The late Mrs. Astor 
once cut the New York Four Hun- 
dred to one hundred and fifty. The 
socially elect as it were, the very 
cream of high society, but San 
Francisco is a bit more generous and 
our Four Hundred is a Four Hun- 
dred no more. Think of it! Two 
hundred only are really IT. The 
new club has been formed for the 
purpose of entertaining distinguish- 
ed visitors to the Exposition and 
the first meeting will take place 
next Monday evening at the Mayo 
Newhall home on Scott street. 

* * * * 
Graceful Couples 
Now that everybody in society 
daices and dances so well, it is in- 
deed an honor to be declared pre- 
miere danseuses as were Miss Wini- 
fred de Wolfe and Mrs. Frederick 
Palmer at the tea dance at the 
Fairmont last Monday. Everybody 
who aspired to dance took their 
tables while these two dainty young 
women and their partners gave an 
exhibition tango. Miss de Wolfe's 
partner being Quentin Tod, while 
Mrs. Palmer did the intricate steps 
with her regular "dancing partner," 
Grattan Phillips. Miss de Wolfe, 
petite and slender is really a most 
remarkable dancer. She is only six- 
teen years of age and her friends 
predict a brilliant future for her 
should she take up dancing profes- 
sionally. She was studying in Paris 
when the war broke out, and but 
for that would doubtless soon be 
making her professional debut. 



The Jackling Money 

All the smart set are watching 

»ith interest tin- pursuit of the re- 
doubtable Colonel Jackling by two 

of our fairest society maids, and 

bets arc about even a- to which, if 
either, will win out. Both belong 

t" tl xclusive set. ami both are 

tall, slender, brunette Mini very 
dashing. Bach of the tun fair aspir- 
ants for the wealthy Colonel's rav- 
or made her debut several seasons 
ago, so have the advantage of so- 
cial experience. One girl has Mrs. 
Mountford Wilson's active hacking, 
while the other is backed by the 

Hopkins-Scott clan. Colonel Jack- 
ling by the way. is quite the most 
picturesque figure of any of our 
Western millionaires. He cornered 
the copper market in Colorado and 
amassed a huge fortune which 
makes his indulgence in private 
ears, and yachts worth a king's ran- 
som, and entire floors at the St. 
Francis mere bagatelles. 

* tt -X- # 

Mabel Valleau Dead 
I was surprised to read of the 
death this past week of pretty little 
Mabel Valleau, who was the dash- 
ing Sidney Starr's first wife. As 
Mrs. Starr she certainly made Sid- 
ney's big income go, and her gowns 
and jewels, and many escapades 
were the talk of the town a few 
years ago. The Starrs lived at the 
St. Francis and the dashing Mabel 
was a well-known figure around the 
hotel. Domestic disagreements oc- 
curred however, and the divorce 
courts were called on to sever the 
tie, since which time society has 
heard but little of Mrs. Starr until 
her death recalled her to notice last 
week. 

# # # * 

Debutantes Unlucky 
What an epidemic of accidents 
has befallen our society maids dur- 
ing the past fortnight! First there 
was pretty Miss Gertrude Hopkins, 
who went a cropper when her horse 
fell in a paper chase, but who for- 
tunately was not seriously injured. 
Miss Hopkins is by far the beauty 
of this season's debutantes, and any 
mar of her beauty would indeed 
have been regrettable. Then Miss 
Elva. de Pue met with a similar 
accident a day or two ago, but 
less fortunate, as her injuries con- 
sisted of a broken arm and severe 
contusions. And now Miss Gert- 
rude Kunyon, attractive society 
maid of Sacramento, who was visit- 
ing friends here, has joined the lists 
of fair unfortunates. She was 
struck by an automobile on Market 
street and quite seriously injured. 
But she is plucky for all her hurts, 
for as she says, "it might have 
been worse. I might have been hit 
by a jitney." 

-x- * * -::- 
Divorce Rumored 
A recent visitor to our city who 
is being welcomed at all manner of 
delightful functions given in her 
honor, is Mrs. Kussel Bogue, now of 
New York, but formerly that ex- 
quisite little bit of feminity, Miss 
Maude Payne of San Francisco. 



11 



Mrs. Bogue is the daughter of .Mrs. 
J Eugene Freeman and was a great 
belle in society here before her mar- 
riage to Virgil Bogue*s good-look- 
log son, Mr. Bogue is a brother of 
the Inilliaiit and beautiful Yirgilia 
(Continued on page 14) 



HEARING 

for the 

DEAF 

We are pli taset i u> announce that we 
have received another large .shipment of 

LITTLE GEM EAR PHONES 

anil will renew our demons trillions 
dally at our Post St ;ind Oakland 
Stores beginning this week. 

heg N'uw is the time for all good 

W. D. Fcnnimore 1 i | / , A. R. Fenniraore 
' \ J. W. DaviB' 



« 




mm 

181 Post Street 



San Francisco 



2508 Mission St. 

1221 Broadway, Oakland 




•ILTMO 

NEW YORK \ 

America's Latest and I 

j Most Refined and New I 

j York's Centermost Hotel 

| Only hotel occupying an entire city 
block, Vanderhilt and Madison Avs., 
43d and 44th Sts., adjoining Grand i 
i Central Terminal 

| 1000 rooms; 950 with butli — itoi 
from $2.ri0 per day. Suites 
to 15 rooms for perm fluent 
pnncy. Large mid smalt bill 
and din jug salons and 
ialty arranged for p 1 
or private lunetious 
^ Gustav Bfluman 
.John McE. Bowma. 
Vice-Prc: 




* I 

,§ Phone Douglas 5370 9 

I M. E. GALLAGHER | 

(? Fancy, Street, Reception and Evening & 

I GOWNS I 

i| Jt Jjt Jt a 

"| WEDDING TROUSSEAUX | 

$ J* J* J* 5 

& 96-97 Whittell Bldg., 166 Geary St. | 



San Francisco. 



[«:<^<^<^<^<^<^^<^<^^t^Sfe&: 



I The "Frances" 

£ IIAIRDRESSING AND 

5 MANICURING PARLORS. 
§ 110 GEARY STREET. 
<§ Purchased and Now Conducted by 

I 77?rs. J. Williams 

% Formerly Manager Hair Dressing $ 

6 Dept., The Emporium. & 



12 



THE ^VARP 



Saturday, January 30, 1915 



WHEAT FOR LAST YEAR 

Figures communicated to the In- 
ternational Institute of Agriculture 
show that the wheat production of 
1914 in the group of countries repre- 
senting some 80 per cent of the total 
population of the northern hemi- 
sphere totaled 792, 000, 000 quin- 
tals, (cwts') as compared with 872,- 
000,000 in 1913. 

As against the average produc- 
tion for . the ten years 1903 — 12 of 
686,000,000 quintals the year's pro- 
duction shows an increase of 106,- 
000,000 quintals, while the produc- 
tion of last year was very exception- 
al. The production in Argentina, 
Australia, New Zealand and Ura- 
guay last season was 66,000,000 quin- 
tals, a figure much below the aver- 
age for the past ten years. 

The general rise in prices appears 
to have been due largely to the dif- 
ficulties of transport caused by the 
war in Europe. In Vienna and Bu- 
dapest wheat has risen from f.22 to 
f.23 on November 14 1913, to f.42 to 
f.44 on Nov. 13 last. In great Brit- 
ain prices are rising gradually. On 
Nov. 13 1913, wheat was quoted on 
the London market at 14s. Sd. to 
17s. (f.18.5 to f. 21.5), whereas on Nov. 
6, 1914, the price was 19s. lOd. to 21s. 
lOd. (f.25 to 127.5) per quineal. 

In exporting countries the price 
has increased from 4% to 6 per cent. 
In Germany and Austria-Hungary 
rye barley and oats have also in- 
creased in price. The total produc- 
tion of oats has been about 497,000,- 
000 quintals, a falling off of about 
12.5 per cent as compared with last 
year in the northern hemisphere, 
but higher than the production for 
the preceding ten years. , 

The production of barley in count- 
ries representing 90 per cent of the 
northern hemisphere is estimated 
for the present year at 261,000,000 
quintals, an improvement as com- 
pared with the decennial average, 
but somewhat less than 90 per cent 
of the 1913 yield, while the yield of 
rye is estmated at 387,000,000 quin- 
tals, a decrease of 4 per cent as com- 
pared with the 1913 figures, but an 
increase on the figures for the pre- 
ceding ten years. 




Some are born to greatness: 5oivie --etc. 

THE MONEY MAKERS 

(By X-WALL) 



Federal Reserve Fine 

The Federal Reserve banking sys- 
tem has already fulfilled its great- 
est mission, proven its exact place 
and great worth— it has abolished 
the over-sensitive nerves of, and giv- 
en backbone to, American bankers. 
The fact is, now that we have the 
Federal Reserve Bank, with practi- 
cally unlimited means of meeting 
commercial needs by loans, there is 
very little or no demand for such 
assistance by the banks through- 
out the country. They have never 
actually lacked for money to make 
all the loans that were really good 
and secure and needed in legitimate 
operations. What troubled them 
may be best expressed by recalling 
a famous epigram uttered by ex- 
Governor Sprague, then United 
States Senator and the head of the 
great house of A. & A. Sprague, 
mill-owner and cotton-goods mer- 
chant—a millionaire — in a speech in 
the Senate Chamber. "There is no 
such coward as a half million dol- 
lars—except a million." About 85 
per cent of the bankers and bank 
managers of the country have al- 
ways been more thna prudent. They 
have been so scary that, when there 
was a little rumbling of distant 
thunder in the financial world, they 
have withdrawn themselves inside 
the shell of the president's room 
and sometimes down into the steel- 
clad vaults, and, by their dismal 
talk, refusal of loans and unneces- 
sary contraction of business accom- 



THE ANGLO & LONDON PARIS 
NATIONAL BANK 

SAN FRANCISCO 

. — -—,._ _ Capital $ 4,000,000 

~~~"^~ Surplus and Profits. 1,600,000 

Total Resources.... 40,000,000 

OFFICERS: 

Herbert Fleischhacker President 

Sig. Greenebaum. .Chairman of Board 

r Washington Dodge. . . Vice-President 
J. Friedlander Vice-President 

, C. F. Hunt Vice-President 

R. Altschul Cashier 

C. R. Parker Assistant Cashier 

Wm. H. High Assistant Cashier 

H. Choynski Assistant Cashier 

G. P. Eurdick Assistant Cashier 

G. F. Hen- .... Assistant . Cashier 
A. L. Langerman Secretary 




modations, have started panics of 
more or less extent often to the ruin 
of enterprises and to the bank- 
ruptcy of honest men of sound 
business judgment. The Federal 
Reserve comes to them as a ready- 
made, bomb-proof shelter, into 
which they can go and bring forth 
all the ammunition their customers 
may demand should their own re- 
sources run short. So they now 
have courage to let common sense 
and business perspicacity rule their 
banking methods, and hereafter 
there will be no lack of capital ac- 
commodation at reasonable rates. 



More Grain to Come Here 

Congestion of the grain traffic, at 
Atlantic coast ports, may help San 
Francisco to get a larger share of 
this line of exporting business than 
it has had for several years, accord- 
ing to those directly concerned. The 
railroads have placed an embargo 
on wheat shipments to Baltimore 
because the grain elevators there 
are filled to capacty and hundreds 
of carloads are waiting with demur- 
rage charges piling up. 

New York and Philadelphia ele- 
vators and freight yards are fast 
getting in a similar condition and 
the railroads may take action 
against further shipments to those 
ports. 

Figures supplied by railroad men 
and wheat exporters show that the 
B. & M. grain elevators have 1,500,- 
000 bushels in the bins. Cars in 
the yards hold about 200,000 bush- 
els more, while the B. & A. grain 
elevators contain about 1,000,000 
bushels. There is still room for 
more wheat in the B. & A. elevators. 
Local exporters and railroad men 
declare that of the grain held here, 
about 1,000,000 bushels will leave 
next week. 



At Bergers 

The Indoor Yacht Club is plan- 
ning some big stunts along about 
the time the Exposition opens in 
February. Sam Berger, who is the 
leading spirit of the Club, has some 
ideas in mind that he is not yet 
ready to disclose. Berger is a mem- 
ber of the Berger Establishment on 
Market street, an exclusive store for 
men. 



High 

Grade 

Municipals 

Free from the expense and annoy- 
ance of the Federal 
Income Tax 

Byrne & 
McDonnell 



NEW YORK, NEWARK, 
SAN FRANCISCO 



Merchants Exhange Bldg. 
San Francisco, California 



The German Savings 
and Loan Society 

(THE GERMAN BANK) 
Savings Commercial 

Incorporated 1868 
626 California Street San Francisco 

Cal. 

Member of the Associated SavingB 

Banks of San Francisco. 

The following Branches for Receipt 
and Payment of Deposits only: 
Mission Branch, S. E. corner Mission 

and 21st Streets. 
Richmond District Branch, S. W. cor- 
ner Clement and 7th Ave. 
Haight Street Branch, S. W. corner 
Raight and Belvedere. 

DECEMBER 31st, 1914 

Assets $58,584,596.93 

Deposits 55,676,513.19 

Keserve and Contingent 

Funds 1,908,083.74 

Employees' Pension 

Fund 188,521.05 

Number Depositors 66,442 

Office hours: 10 o'clock A. M. to 
3 o'clock P. M., except Saturdays to 
12 o'clock M. and Saturday evenings 
from 6 o'clock P. M. to 8 o'clock P. 
M, for receipt of deposits only. 

For the 6 months ending Decem- 
ber 31st, 1914, a dividend to de- 
positors of 4 per cent per annum 
was declared. 



Wells Fargo Nevada 
National Bank 

Of Sau Francisco 

Nevada Bank Building. 2 Montgomery St., 
N. E. Corner of Market St. 

Capital Paid Up $6,000,000.00 

Surplus & Undivided Profits 5,148,628.93 



Total 511,148,628.93 

OFFICERS. 
Isaias W. Hellman, President 
I. W. Hellman, Jr., Vice-Prns. 
F L. Lipman, Vice-Pres 
James K Wilsun, Vice-Prea. 
Frank B. King, Cashier. 
C. L. Jacobs, Assistant Cashier 
VV. McOavin, Assistant Cashier 
C. L. Davis, Assistant Cashier 
A. D. Oliver, Assistant Cashier 
A. B. Price. Assistant Cashier 
DIRECTORS. 



Isaias W. Hellunwi 
Joseph Sloss 
Percy T Morgan 
F. \V. Van Sicklei. 
Wm F. Iierrin 
John C. Kirkpatrick 
J. Ileiirv Mever 
A. H V 



I. W. Hellman. J 
A. Christeson 
Wm. HaaB 
Hartland Law 
Henry Rnsenfeld 
James L. Flood 
Chas. J. Deering 
James K Wilson 



K L. Lipman 

ACCOUNTS INVITED 

nui Service. Courteous Attention, Un 

excelled Facilities. 

SAFE DEPOSIT VAULTS 



Saturday January 30, 1915 



THE WASP 



SPORTSMAN'S NOTEBOOK 

By R. C. Bailey 



A Great Tournament 
More definite information regard- 
ing the Panama-Pacific Polo Tour- 
nament is now available. The first 
game will be played March 15 on 
the Exposition field. Rumor had 
it that difficulties had arisen be- 
tween the local players and the ex- 
position people, but there is not 
# # * * 

an iota of truth in it. The only 
obstacle the management had to 
face was the war. That loomed 
large at first. There is undoubted- 
ly a lot of valuable polo material 
tangled up in that welter of ghast- 
liness and splendor in Flanders. 
Hut the Americans are available, 
and all that is important and in- 
teresting north and south of the 
Canal will be here with the Ides 
of March. 

« * •* *- 

For instance, Foxall Keenes, the 
most traveled polo player alive, is 
coming. More '.interesting istories 
are related about Foxall than any 
boots and bridle man in the U. 
S. A. It was he who told the be- 
ginner, complaining of loss of form, 
that he "was neglecting his polo 
for his wife and business." Foxall 
keen" is correct. 

Harry Payne Whitney is also ex- 
pected, and Lawrence Whitney. 
Perhaps the Big Four will get into 
harness again. It would be thor- 
oughly thrilling to watch the men 
who brought the challenge cup 
from England on the "old trail" 
again. 

The Breese Nerve 
Richard M. Tobin heard this 
week from a number of polo play- 
ers who would like to be here but 
arc detained by the only thing that 
compares with polo in the matter 
of excitement. Lawrence Breese was 
attached to a maxim gun in Lord 
Kitchener's army, when he met 
Lord Tweedmouth, another Penin- 
sular poloist. The hard-riding peer 
had just had all his teeth knocked 
out by shrapnel in Flanders. He 
had returned to the dentists. Breese 
bemoaned the fact that it would 
be so long before he achieved the 
front and Lord Tweedmouth, pro- 
moted by the death of superiors 
and his own bravery to the com- 
mand of the Royal Horse Guards, 
promptly gave the young Califor- 
nian a commission in his regiment. 
It is not generally so easy to get 
into the most exclusive cavalry 
corps in the British Empire. Pos- 
sibly Breese is the first American 
who ever did it. In any case, 
Tweedmouth has ridden hard with 
him and against him on Peninsular 
polo fields and knew he was the 
right stuff. Sundry men, who play- 
ed cricket with Breese this summer, 
would admit the same thing with 
alacrity. 

-X- «■ * * 

Conway Seymour, another polo 
man popular down the peninsular, 



is in the Scots Guards. He hoped 
to be at the front before Breese, 
because more infantry are now 
wanted than cavalry. Seymour Is 
a grandson of the Marquis of Hert- 
ford. Raoul da Val has seen right- 
ing in the French army, been seri- 
ously wounded more or less, recov- 
ered and returned to the front— all 
since that moonlight ball in the 
San Mateo polo club in August. 
* * * # 

We Lack the Girls 

Some sarcastic person, male, of 

course, has been declaiming that 

none of the rising generation of 

local girl tennis players is good 



tennis generally. The thinks that 
they are a handicap to the game. 

More men would play if there were 
no girls. Some athletes think there 
is nothing wrong with an effemin- 
ate pastime. If nothing else, such 
views are original in these days of 
feminine emancipation. 
* * # # 

Vote For New York 
Hut there not many ('alifornians 
who will agree with him. They are 
all for the true democracy of sport- 
This was demonstrated in dramatic 
fashion this week. The Pacific As- 
sociation of Tennis has planked ten 
votes in favor of removing the na- 
tional tournament from Newport 
to New York. Californians desire 
to sec their Eastern brethren enjoy 
the same advantages. At Newport 
only the few and rich can enjoy the 




Mrs. Thomas C. Bundy (formerly Miss May Sutton) 



enough to be despatched East to 
sustain the high honors of Cali- 
fornia tennis. He is something of 
an authority, though it hurts to 
admit it. The Misses Florence .Sut- 
ton and Mrs. Bundy and Miss Hazel 
Hotchkiss (that was) and Miss May 
Brown he claims are first-class and 
capable of upholding California's 
credit, but there is no one of their 
calibre arising. The feminine cham- 
pions, who divide the honors on 
local courts ,in his view, achieve 
only amiable mediocrity. His crit- 
ic is rather impatient with feminine 



best tournament of the year. At 
New York tens of thousands may 
attend the games. It was marvel- 
ous how mixed in nationality, age 
and calling the great crowd was 
that watched the meeting of Aus- 
tralia and America last season. 

* -:;- * * 

Experienced sportsmen recognize 
that the only way to develop cham- 
pions in any sport is to draw a 
comb through the whole popula- 
tion. That is why it is only at the 
democratic sports that world's 
champions arise. Scotland turns 



Select Assort- 
ment of fine 
candies and 
patisserie. 
********** 



Telephones 

Douglas 3266 
Douglas 3267 




French Confectioner/ 



* *** , i"i '*' i"i " i | 

Ice cream to 
order. Wedding 
cakes and 
cream cakes a 
specialty. 




211 Powell Street 
San Francisco, California 



13 

out world-beaters at golf because 
the whole population plays. The 
same Is true in regard to swimming 
and cricket in Australia. Rugby in 
Xeu Zealand, soccer in England, 
and track athletics in America. 
Every hoy in this country with 
sliced and stamina has a chance of 
showing it in the well-organized 
school sports. California has also 
organized her tennis in the same 
large spirit and with the same in- 
variable success. Anybody with a 
racquet and a pair of shoes can go 
and match his skill against the 
world at Golden fiatc Park until 
the skill of a McLoughlin or Miss 
Sutton be theirs. California wants 
to see New York get the same 
chance. Especially as they can now 
talk about it on the telephone. 
» # # * 

Basket Ball Arrives 
Basket ball is compelling more 
attention every day among those 
who are fond of games. It has ceas- 
ed to be a very minor sport for 
very small people and is played by 
trained athletes and watched by 
large crowds. There is not enough 
space to accommodate those who 
desire to see the games at the Olym- 
pic Club when one of the two wing- 
ed-O teams are at work. The fact 
that ninety teams entered the P. A. 
A. tournament show-s how wide- 
spread is the interest throughout 
the state. The city auditorium is 
certain to be jasqed for the Na- 
tional championship games in con- 
nection with the Panama-Pacific 
tournament next month. The bup- 
lic now knows that basket ball is 
fast, thrilling and demands pluck 
and skill. In fact it is a regular 
game— the indoor relative of base 
ball. 



For Health, Strength 

Damiana Bitters 

Naber, Alfa k Brunt*. Agent-*-. 

•336 HOWAED STREET 

Opposite New Montgomery Street 



WANTED! 

Diamonds Pearls 

HIGHEST CASH VALUE PAID 

PAWN TICKETS BOUGHT 

Phil. Schuman, Whitney Bldg., 133 

Geary Street. Room 524. 

Tel. Dnuelas 4125. 



aWIIIII' llllllll!llllll'i;/^\\«%^llllllil!llllllllllllllllllinil!l/% 

S Phone Douglas 4398 " 

3 = 

S MME. H. £. EUEDELL, Corsetlere. 1 

1 THE CORSET SHOP I 

= EXCLUSIVE AGENTS g 

= BEIN JOLIE, LA PRINCESSE and J 

= HENDERSON CORSETS. § 



s 210 Stockton St., bet. Geary & Post || 
San Francisco. -- 

%IIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIil!llllll»^%ll#%/lllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllll^ 



14 



THE WASP 



Saturday, January 30, 1915 



CAFE NOTES 

A number of gay supper parties 
were enjoyed at the Odeon Cafe 
Wednesday evening, following the 
celebration of Kaiser Wilhelm's 
birthday at the the German House. 
Many prominent Germans and 
their friends gathered at this eat- 
ing place after the affair and con- 
tinued their enjoyment until late 
hours. 



AFTER THE THEATER 

For Good Fresh Oysters 

GOTO 

JOHN'S GRILL 

57 Ellis Street 

SPECIALTIES 

Oyster Loaves 

Lobsters — Oysters — Crab 

Stew — Steaks — Chiops 

WILFBED J. GIKA3D, Prop 



BKHAU : TAVERN. 



Cor. Eddy and Powell Sts. 
Phone Douglas 4700 

A HIGH-CLASS 
FAMILY CAFE 

Where patrons are constantly surrounded 
hv an air of refinement and rpspectnbilttv 

Informal Dansant Every Evening- at 

Nine Except Sunday 

Under the management of 

A. C MORRISON 






Odeon Cafe 

Market and Eddy Sts. 

San Francisco's Leading 
Restaurant 

Vaudeville Evening — 

Concert Afternoons 

A. BECKER, President 
A. J. BECKER, Manager 



J.-B. Pon J. Bergez O. Lalanne 

0. Mailhebuau L. Coutard 



Bergez- f rank's 

OLD 

..Poodle Dog.. 

Hotel i Co. 

and 

Restaurant 




Music and Entertainment Every Evening 

416 - 421 BUSH STREET 

(Above Kearny) 

SAN FRANCISCO. CAL 

Exchange Douglas 2411 



PEDERAL CLUB 

32 TURK STREET 

San Francisco's Popular Rendezvous 

for Sportsmen 



Dance Hall 



Buffet 




Champion Harry Davis is shortly 
to become head of a new real estate 
firm with headquarters in the Ho- 
bart Building. 

* * # * 

"Bobs" Roberts of the "Chronicle" 
will handle the publicity of the P. 
P. I. E. torney at Ingleside. It 
pays $200 a month beginning Febru- 
ary 1st. 

I understand there is some quib- 
bling over the Exposition cham- 
pionships as to where the games 
will be played. According to the 
Sequoyah Golf Club of Oakland, a 
promise on the part of James J. Sul- 
livan as long ago as last April gave 
that club to think that its grand 
new links off the Foothills Boule- 
vard would be selected. However, 
Chairman Charles Templeton Crock- 
er has finally and definitely select- 
ed Ingleside, with Presidio for spe- 
cial handicaps. 

* * * * 

A peculiar accident occurred at 
Ingleside on last Sunday. While 
teeing off on the 15th hole, Dr. John 
J. Parkinson sliced his ball into 
the Junipero Sierra Boulevard strik- 
ing the driver of a Ford motor car 
on the hand. The man suffered two 
broken fingers. He was given at- 
tention at the Club House and left 
insisting that it was just hard luck 
and no one was to blame. 

* * * * 

The membership of the Presidio 
Golf Club has reached its maximum 
of two hundred members. The 
house committee estimates the cost 
of maintenance per month at $1850. 
The greens are in excellent condi- 
tion just now. 

•x- * * -x- 

John H. Spring, the financier, is 
the latest convert to the old Scotch 
field pastime. Saw him on the Del 
Monte links last week. 

* * * * 

What is this about Mr. Herbert 
Law retiring from the links and the 
annual championships because of 
the nervous strain of tournament 
work? This is strange indeed. 
* * -x- # 

The San Francisco hotel keepers 
are discussing the idea of an Hotel- 
man's Golf Club, after the manner 
of the Hotel Managers Golf Club of 
New York, which plays over the 
Garden City Links. Harry Wills 
of the Bellevue and Charles Stew- 
art Jr., of the Hotel Stewart are the 
moving spirits. 



Gray hair restored to its natural col- 
or by Alfredum's Egyptian Henna — a 
perfectly harmless dye, and the effect 
is immediate. Tnj most certain and 
satisfactory preparation for the pur 
pose. Try it. At all druggists. — Advt 



SOCIETY INS AND OUTS 

(Continued from page 11) 

who was queen of our first Portola 
festival some half a dozen years ago 
and Miss Bogue was a gorgeous 
type of brunette beauty and had 
other claims to attention beside 
her good looks. She was -a great 
student and laid claims to literary 
honors when her first book, a novel, 
was published here. Shortly after 
that took place she startled society 
by her marriage to Carlo Baron, 
who it was said was a member of 
a great Italian family, but who fol- 
lowed the humble profession of 
motorman on a United Railroad 
car here. The Baron's left for Italy 
where their divorce has frequently 
been rumored but never confirmed. 
They had one child, a beautiful 
boy, who died under very sad cir- 
cumstances in Denmark, where Mrs. 
Baron was visiting a couple of sum- 
mers ago. 



Conspicuously Absent 

I am in receipt of a very interest- 
ing communication this week from a 
member of the bride's family, call- 
ing attention to the fact that rela- 
tives were decidedly conspicuous by 
their absence at the recent marriage 
of Miss Jane Hotaling and Alfred 
Swinncrton. The fact that it was a 
civil ceremony which united the 
young couple was commented upon 
extensively by society. Judge Mel- 
vin performed the ceremony before 
a limited number of guests, but the 
bride's grandmother, Madame Ho- 
taling and her uncle Fred, were 
noticeably not among those present. 
In fact they were very conspicuous 
by their absence and most of the 
guests present were asking for 
"Grandma Hotaling." The truth is 
that the Hotaling family are de- 
vout Catholics and they never for- 
gave Anson Hotaling for marrying 
a Jewess. Mrs. Anson Hotaling was 
Ella Kaufmann, a penniless Port- 
land girl when she married the scion 
of the wealthy Hotaling family and 
she has never been on the best of 
terms with her husband's relatives. 



A Tosti Song 

Darling, our day is over, 

Ended the dream divine, 
. You must go back to your life, 

I must go back to mine; 
Back to the joyless duties, 

Back to the fruitless years, 
Loving, though divided, 

All through the endless years. 
How can I bear to leave you, 

How can I let you go, 
I that you love so well, 

You that I worship so? 

Darling, the night is ended, 
Waneth the trembling moon. 
Hark ! how the wind ariseth, 

Morn will be here too soon. 
Tell me again you love me, 

Kiss me on the lips and brow, 
Love of my soul, I love you. 

How can I leave you now? 



^Illlllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllll 




= The Mark of the Candy of Character 



1<< 



Small Blacks"/ 

= A COFFEE CONFECTION g 

g Halt As Sweet As Other Candy 5 

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| 32-36 GEARY STREET | 

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HOTEL AND RESTAURANT 
64-66 Ellis Strest 



Our Cooking Will Meet Tour Taste. Our 
Prices Will Please Yon. 



The New 

POODLE DOG 




HOTEL & RESTAUR ANT 

WILL REMAIN AT CORNER 

POLK and POST 

SAN FRANCISCO 
Telephones: Franklin 2960; Rome C 6706 



Pearl Oyster House| 

Phone Douglas 4788 

FISH AND SHELLFISH 

In All Its Varieties 
Pine-St. Entrance, CaUfornia Market ! 



>m~:~:~:~:~:~:~:~:~:~:~:~:~:~:k~:~:* 
I 



•> Phone China 571 



| ShanghaiLow j ! 

Chop Suey and Noodles 



| 

A Furnishes the Very Best Chop 

A Suey and Oriental Dishes in the 

A Finest Home like Dining- Boom in 

A the City. 

Y First Class Service, Special Booms 

Y, for Ladies 

^ 532 GRANT AVENUE 

% Between California and Pine Sts. 



Saturday January 30, 1915 

SUCH A LONDON NOW 

Women of society are working 
n the various guilds, relief organ- 
isations and hospitals which 
ire providing for the soldiers 
it the front and caring for the 
rounded. Devonshire House, Pica- 
lilly is ;i scene of great activity in 
ta work for Queen Mary's fund: the 
argc drawing rooms at 3 Grafton 
street are filled high with clothes 
or the soldiers: the Duchess of A — 
ind her daughters, all in deep 
)lack, are sorting and packing these 
lothes into bundles, while other 
adies direct and ship them to their 
i-arious destinations. Great calm 
ind silence and perfect organisa- 
:ion prevail everywhere. 

St. John's Ambulance, with head- 
quarters on the Strand, superin- 
tends the various hospitals, send- 
Qg out nurses, organizing and ap- 
proving convalescent howes, receiv- 
ng and distributing clothes and 
passing on qualifications of volun- 
tary nurses, of whom the supply 
'ar exceeds the demand. 
Hyde Park, in spite of the weath- 
r, is all day a scene of great activi- 
:y, recruits drilling on the campus, 
roops marching up and down the 
oad which skirts Park lane, mili- 
ry bands playing, and the First 
»nd Second Life Guards— what little 
s left of these two regiments in Lon- 
flon—drilling and exercising their 
lorses and anxiously awaiting the 
moment when they shall be called 
to the front. One hardly expects 
it this time and in this climate to 
find many people riding for pleas- 
ure but the other morning there 
wcer over 60 persons riding up and 
Sown the row as gayly as if it were 
Tune instead of December, peace in- 
stead of war. 



What a Difference 

Ex-Presidents Roosevelt and Taft 
travelled into Boston recently on 
the same train, but no one could 
be found who saw them in conver- 
sion between New Haven and that 
'ity. As a matter of fact they were 
two chair cars apart and neither 
ivas aware of the other's proximity 
until the Back Bay station was 
reached at 6:05 o'clock. 

President Lowell of Harvard was 
in hand to greet Prof. Taft and Dr. 
W. Sturgis Bigelow met the Colon- 
el, and some clever engineering was 
Sone to prevent a possible embar- 
issing situation arising. They pass- 
ed each other on the station plat- 
'orm, but no one noticed any signs 
}f recognition. 

Col. Roosevelt was asked by a 
photographer if he would pose with 
Mr. Taft and got this reply: 

"Don't be silly. You know perfect- 
ly well your request is a silly one." 
##■*## 

Madam Ernestine Schumann- 
Heink, the singer, who has been 
seriously ill with bronchial pneu- 
monia at her home in Chicago, left 
there recently and has arrived at 
San Diego, Cal. Her physicians have 
said that she must rest for many 
weeks. Her professional engage- 
ments have been cancelled. 



THE WASP 



15 




THINGS 
WE 

$ SHOULDN'T 
KNOW 



1 



(UP 



AND STILL ANOTHER 

Another minister in bad! Surely 
the churches need no advertising 
these days! It seems they are full 
of good people who every now and 
then discover that they have for 
their pastor a perfect sample of the 
horned devil. We, of course, refer 
to the Rev. Dr. Arthur Maxson 
Smith, whom the daughter of Llwel- 
lyn Smith put through university 
and then accepted him as a hus- 
band, who didn't stay home nights, 
and who finally took to spending 
her money jaunting around the 
country and through the entrances 
to hotels with Alice P. Giffen, sister 
of Mrs. Albert L. Barrows, wife of 
the librarian of the University of 
California. 

Truly that Berkeley atmosphere is 
doped. And it is altogether too 
quiet to linger in long. A man 
begins to think in it of university 
co-eds, and a woman of the charm 
of another woman's husband. A 
good newspaper man any day in 
Berkeley can pick out a story 
which would make the rafters ring. 
But the Rev. D. A. M. S. and his 
"I-never-loved-him" Alice are on the 
griddle, with the First Unitarian 
Church of Berkeley sucking its 
thumb. "The most desperate sort 
of passionate love" of Arthur Max- 
son for Alice has also been rather 
"desperate" for them. It is said, as 
well, that other Berkeley women, 
who might have had a sort of inter- 
est in the Rev. Arthur, are very 
much offended at the way things 
happened. But the palm to Miss 
Giffen — youth and beauty first. 
And, speaking for everyone, it may 
be just as well. The Rev. Arthur 
was a fine chooser, but a very poor 
sticker. He left the lady before 
even the drop of the hat, and with 
all the love coming to him that 
might have been his. 

Why is it that our sinning min- 
isters always turn out to be pikers? 
In the middle of the second act, 
with the pack at the door, they in- 
variably kiss .the pretty ^heroine 
goodbye and leave her standing 
proudly in the center of the stage, 
making their own exit with a rope 
or through the skyscape. 

Is the familiar posture on the 
knees so strong with ministers that 
it is their instinct to "crawl" upon 
the slightest provocation? Is not 
a "most desperate sort of passionate 
love" worth while remaining with, 
having once bitten the apple? Has 
the phrase, "By your side," passed 
entirely from clerical usage? We 
positively hate people not strong 



enough for their sins. And it seems 
to us that an earnest love affair be- 
gun at all, should be perpetuated 
to the very end and then some, if 
possible. 

To think that the Rev. D. A. M. S. 
should deny those pleasant auto 
ramblings with Alice, and the ho- 
tels, and theatres, and the whole 
aromaed April of it! That is enough 
to cool the lady's ardor alone. No 
wonder she explains that she never 
did love him. How could she have 
ever when he does these things? 
But, oh, you Berkeley, if we were 
only to tell all we know about you! 
And in spite, too, of the beautiful, 
moth-ball influence of the various 
professors of your university. 
# * * # 

They Come and Go 
We have a card of J. T. Temple- 
ton, signing himself as advertising 
manager for Gantner & Mattern 
Company. This company has fre- 
quently changed their advertising 
manager in the past, and the va- 
rious advertising men and others 
who have discussed business with 
J. T Templeton and suffered his 
unbearable manners, while they lis- 
tened to all that he does not know, 
are of the opinion that the com- 
pany will change soon again. 



[ Have Serv- 
ed Four Gen- 
erations 
WHY NOT 
YOU? 
T. LUNDY, JEWELER 

Estd. 1871. 718 Market St. 




WONG SUN YUE TEA GARDEN 
535 Grant Avenue 

One of the biggest atractions of 
Chinatown. Only two blocks from 
White House, at entrance to Chinatown. 
Admission (including- tea service) 25c 

Served in the original Chinese way. 
Of easy access for tourists and visitors. 



Eames Tricycle Co. 




Manufacturers of INVA 
LID ROLLING CHAIRS 
for all purposes. Self 
PropellinjcTricycle Chair? 
for the disabled. INVA 
LID CHAIRS. Whole 
sale and retail and for 
rent. 1714 Market St., 
Sftn Francisco. Phone 
ParV 2940. 1200 S. 

Main St., Lot Angelei. 



BAGGAGE OF QUALITY 




(tur light-weight Fibre-Cov 
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idea] in construction. 



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Factory; Eighteenth and Folsom Streets 

Smart Baggage for 
Forty-Seven Years 



J. W. Elson M. Amber §" 

Telephone Kearny 5756 5* 

Amber X Elson 1 

o TJailors and Smporiers ii 

jji 33 NEW MONTGOMERY ST. * 

e? (Opposite Palace Hotel Entrance.) w 

,V San Francisco, Cal. M 



PHONE DOUGLAS 4752 



BLAKE-' 



PHOTO STUDIO 

Smart Posing- — Latest Styles 
Popular Prices 



101 GEARY STREET 



PARAGON BUILDING SAN FRANCISCO 

Satisfaction Guaranteed 



WALTERS SURGICAL CO. 

SURGICAL INSTRUMENTS 
393 Sutter St., S. F. Phono Douglas 1011 



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AT HOME 



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FOR 



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No hypodermic injections. Modern methods, 
no bad after-effects. Utmost privacy. For full 
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NEAL INSTITUTE 

1409 SUTTER STREET, SAN FRANCISCO. 

Telephone Franklin 1098. 

Sixty Neal Institutes in the United States 

and Canada. 



16 



THE WASP 



Saturday, January 30, 1915 




ORPHEUM 

Madame Jeanne Jemelli, recently 
dramatic soprano of the Metropol- 
itan Opera Company, New York, 
will head the Orpheum bill next 
week. Musical- 'critics everywhere 
credit Madame Jemelli with one of 
the finest voices in gran'd opera. 
While with the Metropolitan Opera 
Company she met with glorious suc- 
cess, both in New York and on 
tour, and was regarded as one of 
the most brilliant stars of that 
oragnization. She will sing the 
choicest numbers from her reper- 
toire. 

Paul Armstrong, who wrote "Jim- 
my Valentine" and numerous other 
successful plays, has added to the 
list of his successes a one-act satire 
entitled, "Woman Proposes," which 
will be presented with the well- 
known comedienne Ruth Allen and 
a company of eight. Mr. Armstrong 
thinks it is high time that the 
truth were known about just how 
men who have no idea of marrying 
find themselves wedded and settled 
down. 

Mr. and Mrs. Douglas Crane, who 
return from New York where they 
created a great sensation with their 
ballroom dances, will present then- 
latest terpsichorean sensations. 

Milt Collins, styled "The Speaker 
of the House," is probably the only 
politician whose election is assured, 
his audience invariably electing 
him Mayor of Laughland. Mr. Col- 
lins' conception of the German poli- 
tician discoursing on American top- 
ics is funny in the extreme. 

Mademoiselle Maryon Vadie, a 
youthful and skilful interpreter of 
lyric and classic dances, and a 
corps de ballet under the direction 
of Hans S. Linne. will present a se- 
ries of seven new dances. 

Rae Eleanor Ball, violin virtuoso, 
will be heard in classical and popu- 
lar numbers. 

With this bill Elinore and Wil- 
liams, and Ching Ling Poo termin- 
ate their engagements, 
-x- * # # 
Alma Gluck, Genius of Song 

This Sunday afternoon, January 
31, at the Columbia Theater, lovers 
of beautiful song will have their 
first opportunity of hearing Alma 
Giuck, who is beyond doubt the 
very foremost of the younger genera- 
tion of prima donnas. Her beauti- 
ful soprano voice, is but one of 
many gifts of Alma Gluck. She pos- 
sesses every requisite for a brilliant 
career as a singer, and is a musician 
of exceptional attainments. The 
past year Mile. Gluck spent in 
Switzerland with Mine. (Sembrich 



with whom she worked every day, 
and the great Polish prima donna 
calls her, "My true successor." 

In addition to her qualifications 
as an artist Alma Gluck possesses 
an indescribable quality of charm. 
As an Eastern writer expressed it: 
"Everyone who hears Alma Gluck 
simply falls in love with her." 

The program will include works 
by Gluck, Mozart, Handel, Hadyn, 
Schubert, Schumann, Brahms, and 
other masters. The modern Rus- 
sian school will be represented by 
works of Smetena, Rachmaninoff, 
and Rimsky-Korsakow. American 
composers such as Geo. Chadwick, 
Louis Victor Saar, Charles Wake- 



field Cadman, Kurt Schindler and 
Chas. Gilbert Spross will be on the 
program. 

The second and last Gluck con- 
cert will be given Sunday afternoon, 
February 7, with a complete change 
of program. On this occasion an 
"Aria" from the old opera, "Hippo- 
iyte et Aricia," Beethoven's "Harden 
Roselein," the "Come Beloved" from 
Handel's "Atlanta," and old Eng- 
lish and Italian classics will com- 
prise the first group of works. This 
will be follojjved by a group of 
French works by Ravel, Massenet, 
Charpentlier jand Pialadhile, after 
which Slavic composers will have a 
group to themselves, and a special 
feature in this group will be some 
songs of Little Russia arranged by 
Efrem Zimbalist, the Russian violin 
virtuoso. Works by MacDowell, 
Parker, Gootonetm Worrill and 
other American composers will com- 
plete the exceptional offering. 

Tickets for both concerts are now 
on sale at the usual music stores. 
Address mail Orders to Will L. 
Greenbaum at Sherman Clay & Co. 




Efrem Zimbalist 
Following the festivities attend- 
ing the opening of the Exposition, 
Manager Will L. Greenbaum will 
present the greatest violinist to visit 
us this season, Efrem Zimbalist, the 
young Russian virtuoso, who at 
the age of twenty-five, is ranked 

ALMA GLUCK 

THE SUBLIME SOPRANO 

Columbia Theater 

This Sun. Aft. Jan, 31, at 2:30 

AND 

Sun. Aft., Feb, 7, at 2:30 

Tickets $2.50, $2.00, $1.50, $1.00 at Sher- 
man Clay & Co., Kohler and Chase and 
Columbia Theatre. 

Coming- Peb. 28, The Violinist 
ZIMBALIST 



In March — MAGGIE TEYTE 

Alcazar 

PHONE KEARNY 2 
Matinees Thursday and Saturdays 

Alessandro Bevani 
Opera Company 

Sat. Matinee and Sun. Night "Aida. 

Sat. Night, Carmen 

NEXT WEEK — Farewell Week of the 
Alessandro Bevani Opera Company — 
"Cavalleria Rusticana," "I'Pagliacci," 
"Tales of Hoffman," "Norma." 

PRICES NIGHTS — 50c. $1., $1.50, $2.00 
MATINEES— 50c and $1.00 



CSB£ 



LEADING 

THEATRE 



Ellli and Market 
Phone Sutter 2460 



Last Time Sat. Wig-lit — "To-day" 
Arthur Byron 



Beginning- Sunday Night, Jan. 31 

Matinees Wednesday and Saturday 

Return of the Biggest Success of the 

Cort's Last Season 

Oliver Morosco's Production of 1 

"Peg 'o My Heart" 

By ,T. Hartley Manners 
With Peggy O'Neil 

...And the New York-Chicago Cast... 
Nights and Sat. Mat. Prices 50c to $2.00 

Popular $1.00 Matinee Wednesday 



Safest and Most Magnificent Theatre in 
America. 



Week Beginning- this Sunday afternoon 

(Matinee Every Day.) 



Alma Gluck, who sings at Columbia Theater, Jan. 31st and Feb. 7th 



A MABVELOUS NEW SHOW 
MME. JEANNE JOMELLI, Prima Don- 
na of the Metropolitan Opera Company 
Paul Armstrong's new one-act satire 
"WOMAN PROPOSES," with Kuth Al- 
len and a Company of Eight; MR. anc 
MRS. DOUGLAS CRANE in theil 
Dances; MILT COLLINS, "The Speakei 
of the House;" MME. MARYON VADII 
& CO., in a Series of Lyric Dances 
RAE ELEANOR BALL, Violin Virtuoso 
KATE ELINOR and SAM WILLIAMS 
Last Week — CHING LING FOO and hi: 
Company of Celestials. 



Evening Prices 10c, 25c, 50c, 75c. 

Matinee Prices (except Sundays anil 

Holidays) 10c, 25c, 50c. 

PHONE DOUGLAS 70 



Saturday January 30, 1915 



THE WASP 



17 



imong the world's five greatest mas- 
pS ol the violin. 

Ziiubalist has been often called 
"I'll.- Poet of the Violin." He plays 
liih a spirit of romance quite his 
inn: hi.- individuality of tone and 
ftyle Is as marked as is that of 
ftreisler ol Klman— no one plays 
ust like Zimbalist. Not only is he 
i great violinist, but a great musi- 

■ian as well, and his talent for the 
llano is almost as great as for the 
nolin, while as a composer his orig- 
nality is must striking. 
Zlmbalist promises some most im- 
loitant and unusual programs, in- 
■luding a rarely-heard coneerto by 
Ipohr and one of the important 
Brahms sonatas. The first Zimbal- 
st concert will be given Sunday 
Btemoon, February 28. 

■; ■::■ -;;■ ■::- 

THE CORT 
.1. Hartley Manners' blithe and 
jrcezy "Peg o' My Heart", with Peg- 
b O'Neil and the New York-Chi- 
lago company will be the attraction 
it tin' Cort beginning Sunday, Jan- 
lary 31. Beside Peggy O'Neil. who 
s known to all there will be a star 
■ast with the following: The orig- 
nal "Jerry," Henry Stanford, the 
'Prince Charming" to "Peg's" 
lisions, Reginald Mason, as "Brent" 
tin' misunderstood husband who 
feeks curcease of sorrow in unmanly 
Intrigue at the cost of Ethel's repu- 
tation: Emilie Melville, as Mrs. Chi- 
jhestcr, the stately and formal Eng- 
lish aunt, and Clarence Handyside. 
as the good-natured solicitor: all 
these people arc from the world- 
famous long run of two years in 
lew York. Prom the Chicago com- 
pany come Roland Hoguc, a new 
variation of the silly-ass English 
son; Lillian Kemble Cooper as the 
austere daughter "Ethel," Gordon 
Burby, as the comical butler, and 
Grace Hasemier as a coquettishly 
capped house maid. It is doubt- 
ful if Mr. Morosco has ever had a 
better balanced cast than he has se- 
lected for this company. 

* * * * 

Maggie Teyte 

After the little English girl, Mag- 
gie Teyte, made her debut at the 
Opera in Paris in November, 1910, 
her teacher, Jean de Reszke, wrote 
her the following lines: 
"My Dear and Charming Maggie: 

"I cannot tell you how proud and 
happy I am at your success. All 
my friends tell me of your triumphs 
both in your operatic work and at 
recitals. In fact, everything you are 
doing and have done is appreciated 
as coming from a real artist, and 
your example can serve as a model 
in method and style of singing. Do 
not tire yourself too much, but con- 
serve your precious talent, because 
you will be an "educatrice" to the 
present generation. 

"With the greatest affection, your 
master, 

"JEAN DE RESZKE." 

# * # # 

Dansant at Palace 

Mrs. Lee Rubens, chairman of the 

committee in charge of the dansant 

to take place at the Palace Hotel, 

Saturday afternoon, Feb. 6, between 



tin' hours of four and seven, be- 
seeches the co-operation of the San 

FranciBCO public to aid this event. 

which is for the purpose of raising 

funds for bringing the .National 
Child Labor Conventfio/n to this 
city and to further the movement 
in the prevention of child labor. 

The poor war-strickcu women and 
their children who are now pur- 
chasing their tickets on the install- 
ment plan, will come to this land 
of equal rights and birth and they 
must be met with well-worked out 
plans for their happiness. 

* * * # 

Big Picture Coming 
All those who are following the 
course of the big war. and particu- 
larly German-American citizens, 
will be pleased to learn that a live 
reel official German War Picture, 
sent to America with the permission 
and authority of the Kaiser, will be 
shown for the first time in Califor- 
nia a week from Sunday, at a the- 
ater yet to be announced. 

* -;:■ >/: x 

Teohau Tavern has become the 
scene of a midweek carnival which 
packs the cafe every Wednesday ev- 
ening. This is the gala night of the 
week and all San Francisco shows 



an eagerness to join in the festivi- 
ties. Pun-making souvenirs are pre- 
sented to all and the new maple 

dancing Boor in the center of the 

main cafe is thronged to capacity. 
Not only on Wednesdays, but cv- 
iry afternoon and evening in the 
week the latest ballroom dances are 
Interpreted by those graceful danc- 
ing stars Mr. Robert Carville and 
Miss I. a Marr. To the entertain- 
ment furnished by this accomplish- 
ed Couple is added gratuitous in- 
struction by them in the mysteries 
of the very newest dance steps. 



A Social Hotel 

The Hotel Somerton which was op- 
ened about a month ago under the 
direction of Mrs. W. F. Morris of the 
Motel Cecil, is quickly proving it- 
self as much of a gathering place 
for smart folk as is the Cecil, which 
has always been recognized as one 
of the smartest private hotels in 
the West. Next Sunday evening, 
January 30th, a supper dance will 
be given at the Somerton. Danc- 
ing will begin at nine o'clock. A 
southern supper will be served with 
creamed chicken and corn pones 
and other dainties which are remin- 
iscent of the land of the cotton. 



One of the most charming event- ol 
the month was the meeting of the 
Kentucky Society of California 
which took place at the Somerton 
Hotel on Friday evening, a. binary 
ISth, About l lit i membeds were pres- 
ent. A most interesting program 
was rendered. 



The sale of boxes and of tickets 

for the Mardl Gras ball at the Pal- 
ace Hotel is a record breaker and 
aligners the greatest success that 
has yet been written to the credit 
of the clever society women who put 
over the great annual event in ball 
dom. 




FRANK CROCKETT HAS BEEN WITH 
ENGINE NO. 20. S.F.E.D. 20 YEARS 

Akoz Medicinal Mineral Has Believed 

Him of Rheumatism, Stomach 

Trouble and Files 

"Last spring it began to look as of 
the different ailments I was suffering 
with would force me to retire from the 
service, but thanks to Akoz, I can now 
respond to every alarm as quick as any 
man in the station." This is the way 
Frank Crockett, engine No. 20. tells how 
the wonderful medicinal mineral correct- 
ed his rheumatism, stomach trouble and 
piles. 

Mr. Crockett has been with Engine 
No. 20 over twenty years, and is one 
of the oldest members of the S. F. F. D. 
Continuing, he said: 

"Up to a few months ago I had about 
everything on the calendar. For 15 
years muscular and inflamatory rheu- 
matism has bothered me, and talcing 
so many remedies brought on stomach 
trouble and piles. Last spring they all 
seemed to combine and I was a pretty 
sick man. My friends advised me to re- 
tire from the service but I still held on 
thinking that I would finally get some- 
thing that would help me. My legs 
were so badly swollen that I could 
hardly move and my stomach kept get- 
ting worse. One day I started to in- 
vestigate Akoz. So many members of 
the department told me of the good it 
had done them that I decided to try 
it. I put some of the compound on my 
legs and in five days the swelling had 
gone down. Taking the internal treat- 
ment a few weeks made a big improve- 
ment in my stomach and I noticed the 
piles were bothering me less every day. 
I continued the treatment for eight 
weeks and I now feel that I am entirely 
well. I can eat my meals with more en- 
joyment than I have known for years; 
the rheumatism is entirely gone, and 
I don't think there is a spryer man in 
the department. I owe it all to Akoz 
and cannot praise it too highly." 

Akoz is effective in treating cases of 
bladder and kidney trouble, ulcers, ec- 
zema and other skin diseases. Sold at 
all druggists. Call, phone or write the 
Natura Co., 512 Mission St. Sutter 376, 
for further information regarding this 
advertisement. 



Asparagus Gin 

(Folsom Brand) 

Made of Select and Fresh As- 
paragus and Double Stamp 
Gin 



It is a very pleasant Tonie 
recommended for Kidney and 
Bladder Troubles and agree- 
able to the taste. 



IN GENERAL 
FAMILY USE 

For Sale by 

Leading Drug, Grocery and 

Liquor Stores 

The Rothenberg Co. 

140 Front St., San Francisco 



Mr. and Mrs. Douglas Crane at the Orpheum, next week 



18 



THE WASP 



Saturday, January 30, 1915 



N EWJ PAP 
SHOP 




Mrs. Hess of Magnin & Co.'s copy 
department, has on the press an- 
other brochure based upon the ever- 
entertaining idea of southern folk 
lore. It's a sweet little tale entitled 
"Cotton Tail". Her other book had 
a good run. 

Daly, the adsmith at Shreve & 
Co.'s, is planning a pretty campaign 
for his house during the coming 
spring. His layouts in programs 
and special mediums are always 
characterized by distinctive grace 
and pulling effectiveness rarely seen 
on the Coast. 

Fred J. Kronenfield, advertising 
manager for the Associated Califor- 
nia Fruit Growers' Association, will 
make a campaign in local mediums 
for the Del Monte brands shortly af- 
ter the opening week of March, I'm 
told. 

After a long service at the City 
Desk in the "Chronicle," "Pop" 
Boles is now out of newspaper 
work. You'll find him in a fat berth 
in the Federal building on Battery 
Street. 

General Manager Zander of the 
New Clift Hotel at Taylor and Post 
streets, has adopted the old-time 
idea of letting out his publicity and 
business getting work to an agency 
instead of having such an integral 
part of the Hotel's activities right 
within the house. The Johnson- 
Ayres people have the contract. 
Zandar has embraced the novel 
idea of having a personal body 
guard at the big structure now 
nearing completion, whose duty it 
is to ward off "pests of all charact- 
ers" — but newspaper people partic- 
ularly. 

Down at the "Examiner" you'll 
find a lot of changes. In the busi- 
ness department A. J. Sternberger, a 
good man, has succeeded to William 
D. Potter's old post as head of the 
classified advertising department; 
Fred Stotte, one of the coining men 
on the Hearst paper, is now in 
charge of Credits. In the repertor- 
ial rooms it looks like the Battle of 
the Marne — so many old-time news- 
makers missing. 

A good news editor on a morning 
paper oftentimes fails to hit .356 on 
an evening paper. On a big morn- 
ing paper it is a case of "straight 
news" while on the evening sheet 
"scheme and idea stuff" is always 
in demand. Unless an editor on an 
evening paper has imagination and 
a good understanding of human af- 
fairs and actual conditions around 
about his city, he cannot win. or a 
long time the "Call-Post" has lack- 
ed "personality" and that is the 
reason, according to Peter J. Bar- 
rett, the Press Club oracle. 

General Manager "Al" Williams of 
the Portola Louvre has centered the 



publicity work of the big Powell 
street restaurant within the busi- 
ness office of the big place. James 
King Steele formerly did the work. 
Fred Lynch, the business manag- 
er of the Cooper Advertising Agency 
has been appointed on the Lacrosse 
Committee of the P. P. I. Exposi- 
tion athletic managing board. Fred 
Minto, advertising manager of the 
United States Rubber Company in 
this city, is also a lacrosse enthusi- 
ast. 



how or another everything our Ex- 
position authorities do is "copper- 
ed" by the scary San Francisco pub- 
lic. 



The Beauty Shop 1 



EL CERRITO GETS GAMES 

It looks as though the im- 
mensely profitable championship 
games of the Universal Polo Tourn- 
ament will not all be played with- 
in the course at the fair grounds. Of 
course the majority of the games 
will be played at Harbor View, but 
from what the "Wasp" has learned 
the final games will be played off 
down the Peninsula at El Cerrito 
Field. This means a shift of the so- 
cial activities of the splendid season 
with the overwhelming attendance 
and the $100,000 gate receipts away 
from the Exposition paddocks and 
Director of Concessions Frank 
Burt's money-getters. 

At this time quite a hubbub has 
arisen over the transfer. Still the 
polo set is all powerful socially and 
financially, so it appears that the 
Exposition authorities will have to 
play second fiddle. The final game.-: 
will stand as the pre-eminent event 
of the summer's social calendar. "We 
do not propose to come down to the 
Fair grounds and make a show of 
ourselves for the common crowds 
who can pay $2 to see the games, ex- 
plained a well-known Burlingame 
Club votary to the writer, "and I 
know the feeling among the players 
is that we should let the Exposi- 
tion have the early games but that 
the finals should go down the Pen- 
insula where our people have spent 
untold money in fitting up their 
homes and making ready for a ser- 
ies of pleasurable house parties and 
manor entertainments. We want 
the visiting poloists for ourselves 
and not as mediums for a cheap 
show down at the Exposition." 
This very well explains the situa- 
tion. 

***** 

From what I heard between chuk- 
kars last Sunday at Burlingame, 
the Tobin boys and Francis Oaro- 
lan are deadset upon utilizing El 
Cerrito Field. So is Will Tevis, Rob- 
in Hayne and Walter Hobart. Just 
how the situation will resolve itself 
remains to be seen. In the mean- 
time D. O. Lively, manager of the 
Universal Polo Tournament, so far 
as the Exposition is concerned, is 
going ahead in his campaign for the 
sale of the reserved boxes. He is 
quoting them at the same price 
asked during the international 
meet at Roslin, L. I.— viz. — $100 per 
box. Mr. Lively has invited the 
Caifornia Club, the Bohemian Club, 
the Elks and other clubs to reserve 
boxes, but no one will buy until 
they are assured about where the 
final games will be played. Some- 



Famous Players Coming 

Thanks to Mr. F. Ambrose Clark, 
of Cooperstown, N. W., the readers 
of the "Wasp" may gain a line on 
what players will be here next 
month. For instance the champion 
Cooperstown team will be repre- 
sented by F. S. Von Stade, C. P. 
Beadleston, Malcolm Stevenson, and 
Mr. Clark. Mr. C. C. Rumsey, whom 
"Wasp" votaries will recall as the 
husband of Carol Harriman, may 
come too. The Meadowbrook Mag- 
pies will be strongly represented by 
Charles L Appleton, David Dows, 
W. Goady Loewy, and H. C. Phipps. 
The Argonauts from the same club 
will include Louis E. Stoddart, Rene 
La Montagne, Thomas Le Boutillier, 
and Devereaux Milburn. Also will 
come W. Watson Webb and Wil- 
liard D. Straight. I hear, too, that 
the plucky Kansas City team will 
come to hand with a great aggrega- 
tion including S. H. and T. A. Veilie, 
L. N. Magill and P. H. Noland. The 
Cleveland Polo Club sends A. H. 
Perkins, At. White, Thomas White, 
Earl W. Hoppin and Jay Streiger. 
From Boston, Mass., will come a 
team captained by Frederick Prince 
Jr. The Onwentsia Club of Chicago, 
will send Frederick McLaughlin, 
Edward L. Hasler, F. J. Johnson, 
' and Morros Metcalfe. From Phila- 
delphia will come Mr. P. S. P. Ran- 
dolph, Sr., and his tow sons. The St. 
Louis team will be headed by 
Dwight Davis, while from New Or- 
leans will come the Padgar Four 
headed by James Macdonald and 
Peter Sterling, Jr.. Throughout 
the great Universal Polo Tourna- 
ment readers of The Wasp will be 
kept well abreast of the inside 
chronicles of what is happening. 




aaaa&aaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaa 

A A 

A FOB SALE A 

A A 

A A Wholesale and Retail Wine y 

Y and Liquor House, located in *j* 
A downtown San Francisco. A very a 

Y old established business. The y 
*5. owner desires to go to Europe. *t* 
♦J. For further particulars apply to •*• 
A room 347, at 49 Geary St. Tele- A 
A phone Douglas 1871. A 

I * 

MONET LOANED on Diamonds 
and Jewelry. 2 per cent per month. 
Columbia Loan Office, 3 Stockton 
street. Est. 1872 



Wedding Rings 

Watchmakers, Jewelers, Opticians. 
715 Market St., Nr. Third. 




212 STOCKTON STREET 

UNION SQUABE 

SAN FRANCISCO. CAL 



Hair Dressing and Manicuring 

Toilet Preparations 

Electrolysis 

$ Exclusive Beauty Shop and 
X Specialists 

\ Telephone Garfield 8130 

AAAi<~>Z<~>AA<^<">*<^>ttAAAAA 

LEGAL NOTICES. 



NOTICE TO CREDITORS 
Estate of Olney Speer, deceased. 

Notice is hereby given by the under- 
signed administrator of the estate of 
Olney Speer, deceased, to the creditors 
of and all persons having claims against 
the said deceased, to exhibit them with 
the necessary vouchers within 4 months 
after the first publication of this notice 
to the said administratorat the office of 
M. J. Hynes, Public Administrator, 858 
Phelan Building, San Francisco, Cali- 
fornia, which said office the undersigned 
selects as his place of business in all 
matters connected with said estate of 
Olney Speer, deceased. 

M. J. HTNES, 
Administrator of the estate of Olney 

Speer, deceased. 
Dated, San Francisco, Jan. 5, 1915. 



NOTICE TO CREDITORS 

Estate of Emily Ann Books. 

Notice is hereby given by the under- 
signed executrix of the last will and 
testament of Emily Ann Rooks deceased, 
to the creditors of and all persons hav- 
ing claims against the said deceased, 
to evhibit them with the necessary 
vouchers within ten months after the 
first publication of this notice to the 
said executrix at the office of her at- 
torney, Gerald C. Halsey, at 105 Mont- 
gomery Street, San Francisco, Cal., 
which said office the undersigned selects 
as her place of business in all matters 
connected with said estate of Emily Ann 
Brooks deceased. 

ADA MARGARET PLATH, 
Executrix of the will of Emily Ann 
Rooks, deceased. 

Dated, San Francisco, January 26, 
1915. 

GERALD C. HALSEY, 
Attorney for Executrix 
105 Montgomery Street, 
San Francisco, Cal. 



SUMMONS 

IN THE SUPERIOR COURT of the 
State of California, in and for the 
City and County of San Francisco. 
EDNA M. HEIN, Plaintiff, vs. PEDRO 
GARCIA and BONITA GARCIA, his 
wife, defendant. Edward Lande, at- 
torney for plaintiff. 

No. 59413. Action brought in the Su- 
perior Court of the State of California 
in and for the City and County of San 
Francisco, and the complaint filed in the 
office of the County Clerk of said City 
and County. 

THE PEOPLE OF THE STATE OF 
CALIFORNIA SEND GREETINGS TO: 
Pedro Garcia and Bonita Garcia, his 
wife, defendants. 

YOU ARE HEREBY DIRECTED to 
appear and answer the complaint in an 
action entitled as above, brought against 
you in the Superior Court of the State 
of California, in and for the City and 
County of San Francisco, within ten 
days after the service on you of this 
alias summons — if served within this 
City and County; or within thirty days 
if served elsewhere. 

And you are hereby notified that un- 
less you appear and answer as above 
required, the said Plaintiff will take 
judgment for the money or damages de- 
manded in the complaint as arising upon 
contract or will apply to the Court for 
the relief demanded in the complaint. 

GIVEN under my hand and seal of 
the Superior Court at the City and Coun- 
ty of San Francisco, State of California, 
this 5th day of December, A. D. 1914. 

K. I. MULCREVY, Clerk. 
(SEAL) By H. Brunner, 

Deputy Clerk. 






THE WASP 




Peggy O'Neil with "Peg 0' My Heart" at the Cort 



Wellington Coal 

Best for Family Use 
For Sale by All Dealers 



Western Fuel Co. 



MINERS AND SHIPPERS 




Josephine !•. Caro 



One of the intellectual and artistic 
treats of the winter will be a series of 
twelve readings of Modern Dramas, de- 
scriptive and illustrative of the life, 
manners and customs of the different 
countries, rendered by Josephine U Caro. 

This will be Mrs. Caro's first public 
reading- in San Francisco this season. 
Her interpretations of modern dramas 
have won for her an enviable reputation 
in the artistic world. Most of her ren- 
ditions in this city have been in private 
salons to selected audiences. 

These public readings will be held in 
the art gallery of Paul Elder, 239 Grant 
Avenue, beginning Thursday, January 
28th and continuing weekly until April 
15th. This series is known as "Drama 
Travelogues" and will include: 

1. America. Thursday, January 28th. 
"Romance" by Edward Sheldon. 

2. England. Thursday, February 4th. 
"The Mob" by John Galesworthy. 

3. Ireland. Thursday, February 11th. 
Patriots" by Lenox Robinson. 



4. "Wales. Thursday, February 18th. 
"Change" by J. O. Francis. 

5. France. Thursday, February 25th. 
"The Other Danger" by Maurice Donnay. 

6. (a) Spain, Thursday, March 4th. 
"Marianna" by Jose Echargary. 

(b) Italy. Thursday, March 4th. 
"Sacred Ground" by Guiseppe Giacosa. 

7. (a) Austria. Thursday, March 11. 
"Anatol" by Arthur Schnitzler. 

(b) Germany. Thursday, March 11. 
"Margot" by Hermann Sudermann. 

8. Belgium. Thursday, March 18th. 
"Pelleas and Melisand" by Maurice 
Maeterlinck. 

9. Holland. Thursday, March 25th. 
"The Storm Bird" by Donaert Von Elton. 

10. Norway. Thursday, April 1st. 
"Laboremus" by Bjornstijerne Bjornson. 

11. Russia. Thursday, April 8 th. 
"The Sea Gull" by Anton Tcheckoff. 

12. India. Thursday, April 15 th. 
"King of the Dark Chamber" by Rabin- 
dranath Tagore. 



LA GRANDE & WHITES 
LAUNDRY CO. 



Office and Works: 234 Twelfth St. 
Bet. Howard and Foleom Ste. 

SAN FRANCISCO. - - CALIFORNIA 

Telephone Market 916 



Send for Our Select List of 

EIGHTY CALIFORNIA PAPERS 

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573 Fifth Av«u, 

Hour. 6 to 7:30 p. v 

Phone P^dfre Z75 



W. H. PYBURN 
NOTARY PUBLIC 

My Motto "ALWAYS IN" 

On pmrle Fr.ncau Sc habl. Ejp.no 

Office: 229 Montgomery Street 
Sbo Francisco California 



Valuable Information 

Of a Business, Personal or Social Nature 

from the Pros of the 

Pacific Coast 

ALLEN'S 

Press Clipping Bureau 

SS TIRST STREET 

SAN FRANCISCO. CALIFORNIA 
Telephone Kearny 392 



San Francisco's Restaurant de Luxe 

Adjoining the Columbia Theatre 

Tou do not know this city until you have dined at FRED SOLARI'S, 
San Francisco's most palatial restaurant. World famous for its dis- 
tinctive cuisine and polite service. 

DANSANTS EVERT EVENING 
EXCEPT SUNDAY 
in main dining room, under direction of competent lady manager. A 
place of beauty and refinement and the right people about you. 

FRED SOLARI'S GRILL 

CORNER MASON AND GEARY STREETS 



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THE 



feather River Canyon -Royal Gorge 

ROUTE 

cairns Service 



THE 

Distinctive San Francisco Route 

TICKET OFFICES: 
665 MARKET STREET 1326 BROADWAY, OAKLAND 

Phone Suiter 1651 Phone Oakland 132 

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Golden State limited 

VIA LOS ANGELES 

Chicago, St. Louis, 
Kansas City 

From San Francisco, Ferry Station 
6:00 P. M. DAILY 



SomfcHneirn Pacific 

The Exposition Line — 1915 — First in Safety. 



A/H**^^V«A/M{«/W'HVNVNVHV«tVHVt/MVMVMVVHWM%^^»\ 



NIGHT AND DAY SERVICE 

Franklin Engraving Co. 




DESIGNERS, ILLUSTRATORS 
ITHREE COLOR HALF TONE WORK 

St HALF 





\\S Columbus Avenue 
San Francisco, Cal. 

Our Art Department Creates Distinctive and Original Designs 
for Booklets, Newspaper Advertising and all Stationery 
of Highest Quality. 

The Photo-Engraving Department Produces Cuts in all the 
Modern Processes of Tri-color, Multi-color, Copper 
Halftones, Zinc Etchings and Embossing Dies 



n|^HM^> i 



Vol LXXm-No 6 



SATURDAY FEBRUARY 6, 1915 



Price 10 cents 




~4 WEEKLY JOURNAL 
ILLUSTRATIONS COMMENT 




ESTABLISHED ^ 1576 



r 



i 



Western States Life Insurance Co. 

SAN FRANCISCO, CALIFORNIA 
Continues to grow in strength and prosperity 



WARREN R. PORTER 
President 



FULLY PAID CASH CAPITAL 
$1,000,000.00 



Report of transactions During the year 1914 



This Company announces that it wrote 
during the year 1914 

2563 Policies 
representing 

$5,158,725.00 
of insurance, on which the first premiums have 
been paid to the company in cash. The com- 
panj r now has 

6867 Policies 
in force, representing 

$14,462,471.00 
of paid-for insurance being a gain for the year 
of 

$2,397,943.00 



The Company now has admitted assets of 

$1,802,500.84 

which represents a gain during 1914 in 
Admitted Assets of 

$196,688.73 

The Total Premium Income in 1914 was 

$538,191.34 

This shows a gain over 1913 of 

$73,000.90 

During 1914 the Company's earned interest 
income from invested Assets increased to 

$93,159.18 



The Steady, Substantial Growth of the Company Since Organization is Clearly Shown hy the Following Record: 

Dec. 31st Admitted Assets Net Interest Earned Policies in Force Paid-f or Insurance in Force Premiui 



•1910 
1911 
1912 
1913 
1914 



$1,372,063.41 
1,385,825.62 
1,461,792.41 
1,605.812.11 
1,802,500.84 



$19,996.11 
55,208.41 
75,148.56 
82,226.35 
93,159.18 



468 
1884 
3997 
5486 
6867 



$ 1,551,850.00 

5,140.775.00 

9,384,550.00 

12,064,528.00 

14,462,471.00 



* First Policy Issued July 13, 1910. 



m Income 

$ 42,935.85 
200.098.74 
362,604.61 
465.190.44 
538,191.34 



HUNDRED AND 



THE COMPANY'S TOTAL NET INCOME DURING 1914 WAS OVER SIX 
1HJ1 uumrAJN ° SEVENTY-TWO THOUSAND DOLLARS 

Hi^arad^^^ 

H. J. SAUNDERS 

Vice-President and Manager of Agencies 



Home Office, Wells Fargo & Co. Bldg. 



San Francisco, California 






THE WASP 



LEADING HOTELS AND RESORTS 



Have You Dined in the 

Palace Hotel 
Court? 

Service and Cuisine Perfect 



Fairmont Under Same Management 



Palace Hotel Company 



The management of the 

Hotel St. Francis 

announces the inauguration of dancing in 

the Rose Room, weekday evenings 

Dancing 9 o'clock. Evening dress. 

Dinner and Supper a la Carte 

Geary street entrance or 

through hotel 



MOTEL OAKLAND 

OAKLAND 

Table tVHote Sinners 

Tuesdays, Thursdays, Sundays 

Si. 25 Per plate with, wine 

Informal Dinner Dansants Thursdays VICTOR REITER, Manager 



I 

Special Notice 

During January we will give free a pretty wine tray with £ 
£ ca,sn purchases of $2.00 and over. $ 

X 

Kentucky Mercantile Co. § 



I Phone Sutter 4031 



488 SUTTER ST. X 



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4 

4 

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x 



Hotel Somcpton 

NOW OPEN 
440 GEASY STREET Opposite Columbia Theatre 
Connected with Cecil Hotel and under same management. 
350 Rooms, Single and En Suite. Newly Furnished — Strictly First Class 

MRS. W. F. MORRIS, Proprietor 



- 
V 
t 
Y 
Y 

1 



i FAIRMONT HOTEL |t 

Recognized as the most complete and beautiful residence hotel in the • X 

.J world. 500 rooms, every one with attached bath. • .$. 

The Rendezvous of the discriminating- travelers from every land • X 

Largest floor space devoted to public use of any hotel in the world. • A 

2 EUROPEAN PLAN J •!• 

PALACE HOTEL COMPANY 2 X 

J SAN FRANCISCO • .'. 

s 1 Person $3.00 to $5.00 '{ V 

m 2 Persons $5.00 to $8.00 S V 

••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••■a* Y 



JULES RESTAURANT 




DANCING 

Every Thursday and Saturday Evenings 



Dinner with Wine $1.00 

675 MARKET STREET 



Dancing at 7 p. m. 

OFP. CHRONICLE 



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Established 1853 

Monthly Contracts $1.50 per Month 

NEW WORKS JUST ERECTED AT 

27 TENTH STREET, S. P. 

Largest and Most Up-to-Date on Pacific 
Coast. Wagons call twice daily. Cleaning 
Itainty Garments Our Specialty. 



F. THOMAS PARISIAN DYEING & CLEANING WORKS 



»♦*»♦%+•♦•' 



SING CHONG CO. 




LEADING CHINESE 
BAZAAR 

Importers, Wholesale 
and Retail Dealers in 

ORIENTAL ART 
GOODS 

Kimonos, Silk Under- 
wear, Jade, Jewelry, Iv- 
ory Furniture, etc. 

601-611 GRANT AVE. 

Cor. California, 

Opp. St. Mary's Church 

Chinatown 



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San Franrisco'sJ^ashionable Society, Play and Frolic, in The WASP 



cZSeWASP 

The Pacific Coast Weekly 



^4^siMU^Sk= JITNEY-A MORAL INFLUENCE 



THE SCRIBE 

So neither Peary or Cook wrote 
thi'ir own stories. The eat is out of 
tin- bag, released by a lady. The 
stories were doped and not accord- 
ing to diary. A clever journalist to 
make the story good reading tilled 
in the gaps or obliterated where he 
chose. The result was rather inter- 
esting Action. Our friend Peary. 
however, was canny. He made an 
arrangement that his manuscript 
must be favorable to him. Cook, 
who needed the money, was not so 
particular. The consequence was lie 
got a bad deal. He has been telling 
his own story ever since on the 
vaudeville stage. But out of it all 
conies the staggering truth that 
American journalism cannot be 
trusted, that upon any occasion ver- 
ity will be sacrificed for the sake 
of sensation and circulation. This 
Condition is most regrettable for a 
thousand reasons. But it is an in- 
terlocking psychology difficult to 
remedy. The press is sensational be- 
cause the people are sensational 
and the people because the press is 
sensational. 



In a Class by Himself 
John A. Prentice must have a 
way with him. And at the same 
time some financiers in our midst 
must he marks. He put over on one 
of them an imitation ruby, and 
there isn't a pawnbroker in the bus- 
iness who would accept a ruby on a 
dollar loan. There are a million 
imitation rubies on the market and 
the real ones are to difficult to tell. 
He strung J. M. Duke to the tune of 
a ten-dollar fiddle marked up to 
ten thousand. He spoke of an es- 
tate in Connecticut and he was 
handed a small fortune on it. Real- 
ly he is too clever to do business 
with these gentlemen. He should be 
in the firm of J. P. Morgan, or ap- 
pointed King of the Philippine Is- 
lands. The only person fit to as- 
sociate with him in San Francisco 
is the head of the Fish Trust, or one 
of our women with the alimony in- 
stinct. 



Joy? 
There was a young lady from Go- 
pher, 
Who went out to ride with her 
chauffeur. 
They found her remains scattered 
wide o'er the plains, 
But nothing to show for the 
chauffeur! 



The Wasp refuses to take the jitney seriously — that is — unlike 
some whose interests are involved, we refuse to damn the jitney as a 
malady. It is a business possessed of unexplored angles and we 
pride ourselves on eyes that can see in the dark. We would not 
like to have San Francisco do to it what Oakland lias done, with a 
traction company sitting in judgment. 

The jitney has really not been investigated. The press, blundering 
as usual, has missed the jitney's special influence. Yet it is a vehicle 
of morality and social adjustment. 

The jitney has come to stay because men are born independent. 
Every baby is an autocrat and grown up a slave. But every slave 
looks back upon his independence. The real jitneyer should own the 
spirit of a buccaneer, a cowboy on the plains, or a gallant highway- 
man. He is a Dick Turpin of the road, a free rider in sunshine. He 
is in business for himself as every man should he. The fact that mo- 
tormen are giving up their jobs to drive jitneys is proof sufficient of 
the desire. 

The Chronicle says people cannot cross the street. Then it is en- 
tirely the fault of the "city's finest." Nor did the Chronicle complain 
at all when its flick-flack sporting-board, without permission, kept the 
pivot-point of the city blocked for days at a time. Of course 
the Chronicle does not speak sincerely — one does not expect that of a 
San Francisco newspaper. Within the last ten days two were re- 
ported killed and five seriously wounded as a result of streetcar ac- 
cidents. The jitneys injured a couple but only slightly. We will now 
proceed to uncover the moral aspects of the jitney, something which 
no one has yet touched upon. 

The jitney presents an automobile minus all desire. It reduces it 
from a luxury to the level of a five-cent cigar or a package of hair- 
pins, from a conveyance of "class" to a mere jump-in. Thus it helps 
rid the public of its itching to buy automobiles, and relieves young 
ladies of their penchant to ride in them at any cost. In fine, it will 
prevent half the sinning in San Francisco and take from the chicken- 
chasers their principal snare. 

Also will it preclude the necessity of mortgaging homes. In this 
State the automobile had become an emblem of social standard. 
A man's wife had to have one because another man's wife had. And 
she would insist on having one at whatever sacrifice. Now he can 
say to her, "Go and ride in a jitney." It is gentler than consigning 
her to the hot, nether kingdom. And thousands of poor people in the 
State, who own machines but cannot afford them, can, with the advent 
of the jitney, grandly get rid of them. This will enable them to 
pay their debts and other people to pay theirs. 

The jitney not only takes the devilishness out of a luxury, but 
reduces it to something which all can enjoy without harm. The jitney 
should be taxed but not taxed too much. Our municipal carlines, 
or others, do not matter in the least. If they cannot stand compe- 
tition they have no right to do business. 

The jitney should be regulated but not relegated. Only the driver 
should be constrained from flaring such large signs. This is in 
very bad taste and causes the procession to look like a Labor Day 
parade with Andrew Gallagher lighting the way with an ambition 
to be Mayor on his face. 



RUSSIAN AEROPLANES 

A good deal has been heard con- 
cerning the British and German 
aeroplanes, but the great Sikorsky 
biplanes used by the troops of the 
Czar have been rather overlooked. 
These machines, invented by a fa- 
mous Russian named. Sipkorsky. 
are by far the biggest aeroplanes 
being flown in the war — in fact, 
they are the largest in the world. 
They stand 16 ft in height, and arc 
about 10 ft. wide. The Sikorsky 
can carry almost as many passen- 
ger as an airship. Twenty men can 
be accomodated in the large pas- 
senger cabin, which is constructed of 
metal and contains numerous win- 
dows. In this machine three en- 
gines are fitted, which give a total 
of nearly 1,000 horse-power, for, ow- 
ing to the Sikorski biplane weigh- 
ing in itself one and a half tons, 
and having a large body and crew 
to carry, it demands high power to 
pull it off the ground and keep it 
in the air. 

The weight of the machine has 
necessitated an elaborate landing- 
chassis, composed of numerous 
springs and pneumatic tubes, so 
that the huge biplane can alight 
safely on rough ground at a speed 
of sixty miles an hour. 



The Wise Fool 

"Dead men tell no tales," observ- 
ed the Sage. 

"Maybe not," replied the Fool. 
"But their tombstones are awful 
liars." 

% \ 

l Shreve & Company | 

•jf (Established 1852) 

X Jewelry 

X Platinum and Gold 

X Tableware 

V Sterling Silver and Plate 

| 

V Leather Goods 
X 
•{• unmounted and mounted ? 

% with 14k. Gold and Silver 




Foot Street and Grant Avenue 
San Francisco 



>K M !**H"M , *X"X H >X**X''K**X* 1 I'*H'^* 



THE WASP 



Saturday, February 6, 1915 




INS AND OUTS OF 
THE SOCIAL WORLD 



BY GSACE TIBBITS 



A Bad Start 
Letters from Honolulu tell of the 
serious misfortune which befell one 
of our most popular and attract- 
ive society maids who started re- 
cently on a tour to China and 
Japan. All was blithe and gay as 
the proverbial wedding bell when 
the good ship which carried the 
belle and her chaperone set sail 
from this port. Crowds of friends 
were at the dock to wish the party 
bon voyage. The pretty maid's 
stateroom was filled with books, 
candy and hampers of goodies. Her 
arms were filled with expensive 
blossoms, and smiles wreathed her 
face as the big liner pulled away 
from the pier. No sailing could 
have been more auspicious. But, 
alas, the little Jinx! Misfortune 
was only biding his time and he 
had not long to wait. For hardly 
had the big boat passed Meiggs 
Wharf when some friend called to 
the fair passenger to hurry to the 
port (or was it the starboard?) rail 
to view the wonders of the great 
P. P. I. E;. She turned hastily 
started to comply, turned her ankle 
and measured her length in the lee 
scuppers. In trying to save her- 
self and protect HIS flowers, she 
lost her grip on her handbag, and 
quick as a wink, the precious little 
port-monnaie, containing her 
steamer tickets, letter of credit, and 
all her small change, slipped from 
her grasp and, aided by the male- 
volent Jinx, leapt the steamer's rail 
and fell into the waters of the bay. 
Of course there was nothing for it 
but to smile and be a sport, and 
this the society girl certainly prov- 
ed herself to be. But the journey 
was started just a bit sadly all the 
same. 



Maybe, Maybe Not 
Isn't it a shame that the best 
laid plans of mice and men, as well 
as those of the gossips, do so aft 
gang a' glee? Take the case of a cer- 
tain very prominent society couple, 
for instance, whose domestic infe- 
licities were recently aired in the 
divorce court, with a decree award- 
ed the long-suffering young wife. 
Both are members of the exclusive 
set, have money to burn and good 
looks a-plenty. But they couldn't 
make life in double harness go, and 
finally had to call on the courts to 
grant a separation. Recently, how- 
ever, they have been seen much in 
each other's company, there were 
rumors of tender notes and lavish 
gifts of flowers from the erring hus- 
band to his beautiful ex-wife, and 
the gossips have been chattering of 
a reconciliation in the not distant 
future. But alas for the plans of 
the well-wishers, a fair divorcee, an 
ex-flame of the young husband's has 
returned to town, and presto! his 




attentions to his ex-better half have 
abruptly ceased, and he and the 
fair grass-widow are making his 
wealthy father's money fly. So over 
the tea-cups the tune has changed, 
and the gossips are wondering, 
when the final decree is granted, if 
he and the fair-charmer will plight 
their troth and the young wife con- 
sole herself with the gay society 
bachelor, who rumor has it, is only 
waiting for the year to elapse to 
lay his heart and hand at her feet. 



The Real Thing 
Quite the most entertaining visit- 
ors whom society has had the pleas- 
ure of entertaining in some time, are 
George Randolph Chester of "Get- 
Rich-Quiek-Wallingford" fame and 
his charming wife, and the clubs 
and drawing rooms are echoing 
with the bon mots of the clever 
couple. They have been like a dash 
of tobasco to our jaded appetites, 
and many jolly functions have had 
the Chesters as a motif. 



Some Pictures 
The "Gingham Ball" which the 
Burlingame Club will give this ev- 
ening, has been dividing the atten- 
tion of the smart set with the 
Mardi Gras all week, and quite as 
much time and thought has been 
given by the fair members of the 
ultra-exclusive Club to planning 
their costumes for the one as for 
the other. A gingham dress sounds 
like a very simple thing to arrange, 
but to look chic and smart in one 
is no easy matter and lots of gray 
tissue has been given to costumes 
for the affair. One can quite pic- 
ture dainty little Mrs. Eugene Mur- 
phy in sun bonnet and socks as a 
dashing little girl. And fetching 
little Mrs. Gerald Rathbone will 
make an adorable baby, but one's 
immagination fails to see the state- 
ly Mrs. Francis Carolan garbed in 
calico, and bets ^re even as tp 
whether she will still wear her mar- 
velous $400,000 string of pearls which 
strange to say, came duty-free into 
this country, with a gingham frock 
or not. She is never without the 
gems, 'tis said, believing in the old 
adage that pearls must constantly 
be worn to keep their lustre. Mrs. 
Robin Hayne and Mrs. Thomas 
Eastland will no doubt be chic in 
inexpensive tub-gowns, but can one 
picture the elegant Mrs. Henry Cla- 
rence Breeden or Mrs. William Geer 
Hitchcock without the fine feathers 
which invariably adorn their make- 
up? And are the men's costumes to 
correspond? Can't you see jovial 
Henry T. Scott in overalls, and ro- 
tund Athearn Folger shirt-sleeved 
and straw-hatted, with straw in his 
ruby-ruby lips as the proverbial 
"Si?" 



A Princess to Welcome 
Just who of our smart set which 
always falls for a title, is going to 
entertain in honor of the beautiful 
Princess Braganza d'Avellor, who is 
the lioness of the hour in San Fran- 
cisco this week? One can always 
count on Mrs. Eleanor Martin to do 
the right thing by a celebrity, and 
Mrs. Carolan also, who knows who's 
who in the foreign nobility like a 
book, can be reckoned with to en- 
tertain any one with the proper cre- 
dentials. The dashing Princess Bra- 
ganza, as she is called was born 
in American soil at El Paso, Texas, 
her father being a wealthy Dutch- 
man, and she met her future lord 
at a ball in Cairo. No less a person 
than King Alfonso of Spain intro- 
ducing the young couple, who as 
the Princess naively states, fell in 
love at first sight. The Prince Bra- 
ganza, who is at present fighting 
with the armies of the Allies in 
Flanders, is a relative of that same 
Duke de Braganza who wooed and 
won pretty Anita Stewart of New 
York, who it is said paid a round 
million to settle the notorious 
Duke's debts and win the coveted 
title. Everyone will recall the pret- 
ty how d'ye do which that marriage 
created both here and abroad, the 
Courts of Europe being notoriously 
loathe to accept on equal terms an 
untitled American no matter how 
wealthy she may be. 



She Goes Along 

Gossip which last winter was 
much concerned with the attentions 
which a certain wealthy widower by 
no means young, but mighty elig- 
ible, never-the-less, showered upon 
one of our most dashing maids, has 
quite revived since the personnel 
of the party, whom he has taken 
south with him in his private car, 
was announced and the girl's name 
appeared on the list. Is he again 
worshipping at the brunette beau- 
ty's shrine, and will Colonel Jack- 
ling have to confine his devotion 
to the other brunette who has plen- 
ty of dash and vivacity but no dot 
to speak of? 

■X- # -X- -X- 

A Family History 
Pretty little Miss Robina Henry, 
is the latest debutante to enter the 
lists and although the winter gai- 
eties are nearing an end, she is mak- 
ing up for lost time and a post- 
poned debut, and is receiving lots 
of attention, her piquant beauty 
and pretty, shy manners endearing 
her to all. Miss Henry comes right- 
ly by her good looks and charm for 
she is a daughter of that beauteous 
blonde beauty, the present Mrs. 
Neville Castle, who was Mrs. Mal- 
colm Henry, and before that Kate 
Voorhies, one of the good-looking 
quartette of Voorhies girls. The 
Voorhies family is of fine old South- 
ern stock and they are connected 
with all the best families down in 
Dixie. Malcolm Henry, Miss Ro- 
bina's father, has been in Washing- 
ton society, long on position but 
short on this world's goods, being 
possessed of only a modest clerk- 



ship, where he wooed and won the 
dashing Kate Voorhies. She came 
to California and divorced him a 
few years ago, making her home 
here with her widowed mother 
since. Her marriage to Neville Cas- 
tle, whose first wife was Mary Scott, 
niece of the late Mrs. Munroe Salis- 
bury. She was murdered at Lake 
Como by her second husband, Por- 
ter Charlton, who is now awaiting 
trial in Italy. 

-x- * -x- -x- 

Many entertainments are being 
given in little Miss Henry's honor, 
the fact that her mother and her 
sisters, Mrs. Haldine Putnam 
Young and Mrs. Tom Bishop are 
not on speaking terms, being over- 
looked where matters pertaining to 
the debutante arise. Mrs. Bishop 
is devoted to her pretty niece and 
she and Mrs. Young are both en- 
tertaining extensively for Robina. 
-x- * * * 

A Probable Betrothal 

That vivacious little Dresden- 
china beauty Mrs. Dorothy Heyne- 
mann Greenebaum, has left for Cor- 
onado in the private car of her 
wealthy Cincinnati relative, Julius 
Fleischmann, and plans to make 
quite a stay in the Southland. So- 
ciety is wondering of, upon her re- 
turn, as her year of waiting for her 
final decree is almost up, she will 
announce her engagement to Mr. 
Jacobson, the wealthy Portland 
man, whose attentions to the chic 
little divorcee have been so marked. 
Before her departure Mrs. Green- 
baum had been visiting her close 
friend, Mrs. Struve of Seattle, that 
regal beauty and queen of society 
in the northern city. Mrs. Struve is 
a daughter of the late Jacob Firth, 
and with her sister, Sidonia, now 
the wife of Capt. Weatherall of the 
army, inherited all the late capital- 
ists many millions. Mrs. Struve and 
Mrs. Greenbaum were abroad to- 
gether last year and Henry Hadley, 
handsome young impressario, was 
a constant visitor at their smart 
apartment in Paris. The Fleisch- 
manns, Mrs. Greenbaum's present 
traveling companions are immense- 
ly wealthy and Mr. Fleischmann is 
bringing a string of polo ponies 
with him to the coast. 

Mrs. Willie K. and — 
Just now the interest of the smart 
set hangs on the possibilities that 
the Meadowbrook polo team will 
come to California for the polo 
games this spring. The famous 
Cooperstown team of which Charles 
Carey Rumsey, who married the 
late E. W. Harriman's daughter 
Mary, is captain, is surely coming, 
so that will insure much gayety and 
entertainment for society folk. But 
the coming of the Meadowbrook 
team means much to Burlingame. 
Harry Payne Whitney is captain of 
the famous aggregation and the 
two Waterburys, Larry and J. M., 
also belong to it. By the way, the 
gossips are wondering if Mrs. Willie 
Vanderbilt's coming to California 
will correspond with the time when 
the Meadowbrook team is here. It 



Saturday, February 6, 1915 



THE WASP 



i- well-known In New Stork's smart 
sol that Larry Waterbury is 'epria 

Of Wis. Willie K., ami is In-]- most 

devoted cavalier. He was recently 
divorced from iii- wife, who is now 
in Florida. The Waterbury'a sister 
married Gouveneur Morris, tliat en- 
tertaining Bhort story writer, who 
features Nan fork's inner circle in 
liis clever yarns. 

• • * * 

The Heroines 
There Is no chance that Mis. 
Harry Payne Whitney will visit 
California with the team. .Mis. 
Whitney, who was the former Ger- 
trude Vanderbilt, has been separ- 
ated from her Lord for some time. 
She is over in France, where she has 
organized an automobile ambu- 
lance corps to transport the wound- 
ed soldiers from the battlefields. 
Willie Givin, a brother of our beau- 
tiful .Mary Bell Follis, drives one of 
these ambulances by the way. He 
was in Paris training his remark- 
able voice when the war broke out 
and offered his services to Mrs. 
Whitney. 

* s # tt 

Every Little Movement 
Once again we have the Frederick 
Burnhams with us, and the danc- 
ing set, which now-a-days means all 
society, is anticipating some lively 
tangoes before the jolly Mrs. Bum- 
ham and her good-looking spouse 
hie themselves to their ranch, 
Springhill Farm, near . Martinez. 
Mr. and Mrs. Burnham were pro- 
claimed the best dancing couple in 
society last winter and won the 
prize at the last Mardi Gras for the 
best exhibition tango. I hear that 
Mrs. Burnham has a whole lot of 
new steps in her repertoire and is 
taking her dancing very seriously, 
indeed. She has brought a famous 
dancing master out here with her, 
no less a person than Lewis Sloden, 
late of the New York Roof Beaux 
Arts and the smart set are all 
clamoring for a chance to learn the 
latest step from the great man. 
The Burnham party quite scandal- 
ized the staid travelers in the Over- 
land Limited coming West, by hold- 
ing a series of dansants in the ob- 
servation car. But what would you ! 
One must exercise the dancing mus- 
cles constantly or expect stiffness of 
the joints and Mrs. Burnham and 
the Slodens could not afford to take 
a chance like that. 

•» * * -Vr 

Full Dress?—No! 

While the recently inaugurated 
dinner dances at the St. Francis are 
an unqualified success, a fact which 
no one denies, still it is something 
of a disappointment to society that 
the original plan of the manage- 
ment, to make them strictly full- 
dress affairs, has had to be aban- 
doned. Why is it that the beau 
monde will consider it as an abro- 
gation of its rights to have some 
hotel or cafe management issue an 
edict as to what form of clothes 
they must wear or stay out? Such 
an order has never failed to arouse 
resentment in the breasts of those 



affected and almost invariably a 

hostelry deciding on a full dress 
rule has Jiad to [modify il- dej 
mands or go under. Witness the 
gorgeous Cafe de I'Opera in New 

York, which in spite of the numer- 
ous attractions, offered guests and 
the thousands and thousands of 

dollars spent for decoi atlona alone, 

was forced to close its door- because 
patrons would not come if they 
were forced to don full evening re- 
galia in order to enjoy its hospi- 
tality. Hectors, too. tried to enforce 
full dress, but changed their plans, 
and the Kitz Carleton is now prac- 
tically the only hotel in New York 
City where evening clothes are dc 
riguer. So the St. Francis manage- 
ment knew they were taking 
chances when they issued invita- 
tions to the Monday night dinner 
dances with a "full dress required 
addenda." And when they found 
it "wouldn't go" they wisely chang- 
ed their note. So now, good friends, 
a comfortable shirt waist, business 
clothes, or if the night is wet, and 
taxis shy a seasonable rain coat will 
all be admitted and the danee will 
still go on. 

* * * # 
Our Lady Nicotine 
Smoking in our smart set is de- 
cidedly no novelty these days and 
everybody who is anybody has 
their own dainty bejewelled cigar- 
ette case and their fragrant little 
monogrammed cigarettes ready to 
light between courses or waiting for 
the music to strike up for the next 
dance. We have Mrs. Fred Sharon 
to thank for introducing the sooth- 
ing weed into our hotels and it is 
not such a long time ago that fair 
society maids and matrons were 
nudging each other and whispering 
"Did you see Mrs. Sharon light up 
after luncheon?" And everybody 
will recall the thrill of delicious hor- 
ror which ran up the aristocratic 
spines of our smart set Lady Nico- 
tines when Mrs. Lounsberry of 
New York arrived here just a few 
short years ago and appeared in 
our fashionable lobbies puffing at 
her weed. It has not taken us long 
to discard all sham however and 
now it is the exception to see a 
party of Burlingame society women 
at luncheon or after the play who 
are not contentedly smoking. I 
saw Mrs. Henry Foster Dutton at 
the St. Francis the other day light 
one cigarette after another during 
the meal. Mrs. Templeton Crocker, 
Mrs. Walter Martin, Mrs. Willard 
Drown and the Hopkins sisters, 
Mrs. and Mrs. Will Taylor and Mrs. 
Fred McNear are also constantly 
seen in public enjoying their after 
dinner smoke. And now I hear 
that the younger matrons are not 
the only ones who have the habit, 
but that the insinuating weed has 
also claimed its victims among the 
dowagers as well. I heard a rather 
amusing tale a few days ago. A 
wealthy, middle-aged New York wo- 
man who has grandchildren by the 
score, was paying a visit to a San 
Francisco friend, also a grand moth- 
er, who makes her home with an 



elderly unmarried lister, and very, 

very conservative are they. After the 
daintily served little dinner was 
over, tin- New Yorker, longing for 
her after dinner smoke, decided to 
sound her friends. "Mary." said 
-he. "1 hear that society women, 
even women that we know, actually 
smoke!" "Horrors!" exclaimed her 
hosts in unison. "Yes," said the vis- 
itor waxing bold as her desire in- 
creased, "and do you know that oc- 
casionally. 1 too. have tried it at 
home with my son!" She sat back 
waiting for her bomb shell to ex- 
plode and it did. "Oh Laura! you 
angel," gasped the spinster. "Mary 
and I were longing for a pew puffs 
but were afraid we'd shock you 
with our western ways," and hastily 
she dove into her reticule for her 
cigarette holder, handed her sister 
hers and the elderly trio lit up, 
and laughed at their little joke. 
(Continued on Page 11) 

MRS. SARAH CECILIA CRANE 

Emmanuel Practitioner 
Hours 10 to 4 
1452 Divisadero St., near Geary St. 
Phone Fillmore 3929 



To visit Sun Francisco without see- 
ing A. Andrews' Diai 1 Palace would 

■ visiting Europe without seeing 
Paris. It is a leading feature of S:in 
Francisco, a marvel oi beauty and ele- 
t,';uu'i\ ami is uiH[Ui'sti„n;il>!y the most 
magnificent jewelry store in the world. 
\ 'i-iti.rs aud rosideuts are cordially in- 
vited to examine the marvels of genius 
at 50 Kearny Street. Established 1850. 
Open S a. m. to 5:30 p. m. 



Phone Kearnu 2578 



FOR EXCLUSIVE CUSTOM MADE 
SUITS AND COWNS 



165 POST STREET SAN FRANCISCO 



\ \ \ 


\ \ \ 


v \ 


\ 


\ 


\ 


\/ 


Phone 


r RANKLIN 


5062 











i MRS. F. W. WOOD >>, 

' Formerly F. Gerard of New York 

j>; Sowns and S3 7 o u s es •$ 

% For Sale and Made to Order / 

\ 47S O'FARRELL STREET ^ 

fe SAN FRANCISCO |jj 

y\ \ \ v \ \ \ \ \ \ \ \.N 




/T^ r^HH 



SCHOOLS 




1 PARENTS, ATTENTION! | 

I I 

,§ IN selecting a Business College 9 

j$ i to which to aend your boys & 

t§ or girls, you should remem- S 

•s ber that practically all the expert o 

i§ short-hand reporters of the State <5 

^ advise you that Gallagher -Marsh & 

& Short-Hand System is the best, & 

V and you should therefore send & 

& them to S 

I Gallagher- Marsh 1 

i Business College I 

£ 1256 MARKET STREET K 

$ which specializes on Short-Hand, & 

g. Typing and Book-Keeping. Day « 

p and Evening Classes. & 

& 5> 



HEJULDS"" 5 



RUSSIAN IMPERIAL 
SCHOOL OF DANCING 

VERONINE VESTOFF 
(Late associate of Pavlowa) 

The Imperial Russian 
Ballet School Maintained 
by the Czar of Russia for 
training children to dance, 
is famous throughout the 
world for having brought 
the art of dancing to a 
point of perfection not ap- 
proached in any other 
country. 

Veronine Vestofl is the 
only accredited representa- 
tive of this school in the 
United States. 
Chateau Bohlig — Pine and 
Powell Sts., San Francisco, Cal. 



1215 Van Nets Avenue 
SAN FRANCISCO 



COLLEGE 



16th & San Pablo Ave. 
OAKLAND 



PUCKETT'S 
College of Dancing 

ASSEMBLY HALL, 1268 SUTTER 
CLASSES: 

Beginners' Classes Mondays 

Classes and Socials .... Wednesdays 

TANGO CLASSES Thursdays 

Assemblies Fridays 

FOE PRIVATE LESSONS 
PHONE FRANKLIN 118 



THE KIEIiT STUDIOS 
OF MODERIT DANCES 
Miss Claribel Kirby announces Mr. 
Gilbert Littlejohn has joined the teach- 
ing forces of this instituion. Private 
lessons or class instruction by appoint- 
ment only. Tea and refreshments if 
desired. 

435 Powell Street, 

Third Floor 

Telephone Sutter 2105 

Instructions given with improved 

methods — Fox Trot, Lulu Fado, One 

Step, Hesitation, Tango, Maxixe and all 

the new dances. 



A. MAHR B. M1ECZKOWSKI 

Graduates of the Imperial School 

Russian Dancing School 

Imperial Method Taught 

1509 Gaugh Street, S. F. 

Telephone West 493S 



THE WASP 



Saturday, February 6, 1915 



OBe WASP 

The Pacific Coast Weekly 



Published weekly by 

THE WASP PUBLISHING COMPANY (Inc.) 

49 QEABT ST., SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 
Phone, Doug'las 1871 

MARTIAL DAVOUST Managing Editor 

PAUL, GWYNNB ----- Editor 

GLENN H. JOHNSON Associate Editor 

GERALD C. HALSEY --- Attorney 

SUBSCRIPTION — In the United States, Canada, and Mexico, $5 a year in advance. 
Entered at the San Francisco Postoffice as second-class matter. 



The Wasp -will gladly publish notices of social events and other 
items of interest to its readers. Manuscripts should be at this office 
not later than "Wednesday morning of the week's issue. 



Assemblyman Canepa of San Francisco has an eye for more than 
thicken, it would appear. In a bill devised while sober, he proposes 
an open season for robins, meadowlarks, and blackbirds, and Mr. 
Long of Hanford, who apparently, has the mean disposition of a 
restaurant prune takes a smash in amendment at the turkey buzzard. 
What has the turkey buzzard done, we ask? Can he not look more 
dignified than an Assemblyman without being ruled against and 
having his blood spilt. The robin, of course, is no nightingale, but 
he is a good everyday fellow for all of that, and the meadowlark 
has a pretty song. The blackbird is always beautifully groomed 
and has a useful instinct for worms and insects. Is it possible the 

gentlemen stand in fear of the blackbird? 

# # m # # 

"Lopez once told me that he would die for me," said a comely Indian 
girl in a courtroom in San Francisco the other day, "and when I 
realized the trouble he would be in if arrested for killing Guitierez, I 
thought this was the time to show that I loved him the same way. 
I told the police that I stabbed Antonia Guitierez to death. But I 
don't think the officers will ever find Lopez now, so I decided to tell 
the truth." It is the simple utterance yet the psychology which goes 
with it has become a rarety in the world. It is the elemental 
woman speaking from a thousand years back. — the profoundness of 
love, and the loyalty of matehood. You can feel in it the whispering 
trees of the wilderness and the moonlight on unsailed waters. The 
modern woman would say merely, "I want my alimony." The 
Indians were really a superior race to ourselves but they had not 
enough greed to keep them alive in a competition disgustingly 

sordid. 

# * * * # 

In Henry Ford's carefully prepared answer to questions put to 
liim by the Commission on Industrial Relations a not uninteresting 
fact is conspicuously apparent. The man who conceived and carried 
into execution a practical experiment in profit sharing more preten- 
tions than any hitherto attempted described his motives, processes, 
ambitions and the effects so far observed 'of his effort at social better- 
ment in language so simple and direct that any intelligent person 
could understand it without the aid of a dictionary or a course in a 
ichool of philanthropy. To those familiar with the output of many 
theorists who write and speak on this subject, such clarity was a 
welcome relief. It would be worth while to consider to what entent 
the intellectual characteristics displayed in this incident by Mr. Ford 
account for his wonderful success in busir/ess. 

55 3F * *fr $r 

Our sympathy goes out to the young men of the Oakland 
Y. M. C. A. Having prepared a grand ball to the last detail, they 
f.re told by their seniority that they must dance with themselves, 
that the slim ankle and silk stockings of mademoiselle are taboo. ih 
well ! Ah Well ! So was it that Romeo sighed in the garden of the 
Capulets. So has it always been and ever shall be that the cobwebbed 
and frostbitten have tried to conquer spring. Avaunt old men! Even 
in Oakland you cannot — even a sterilized and pasteurized young man 
must lift his nostrils to May. Her name may be Alice, or June, or 
April, but when he beholds her figure a flower in filmy atmosphere, 
so that the perfumes of the buds seem part of her presence, then are 
precepts useless and your decrees dull. For beyond the horizon again 
are innocent blue eyes and paddly baby hands, and that sound of baby 
crowing as soft as thistledown. The world is always moving to pos- 
terity and it might as well dance that way as not. A song on the 
lips reaches another heart. 



WHY CERTAIN S. F. SOCIETY 
MEN STAY IN NEW YORK 

Anybody who supposed that only 
British lovliness was to be observ- 
ed at the Shubert Theatre is alto- 
geeher wrong. It is quite true that 
all the pretty ladies there come from 
London, specially from the Gaiety 
theatre. Then they are all in "To- 
night's the Night." But do not, gen- 
tle reader, for one minute think 
that they are only British. A. Tox- 
en Worm, who recognizes the source 
of beauty when he sees it, has ut- 
tered the following rhapisodic pro- 
test against any such misunder- 
standing. 

"There is Peggy Kurton," says Mr. 
■Worm in fine frenzy, "a lithe and 
winsome miss who is one of Lon- 
don's native beauty favorites, Her 
hair is a happy blend between the 
blonde and the temperamental bru- 
nette: her cheeks are blushingly 
rosy and tinted with the natural- 
ness of the ripening peach of San- 
ta Barbara; her lips curve artistic- 
ally in Mona Lisa simplicity; her 
eyes sparkle brightly like glimmer- 
ing beacons of joy; and her should- 
ers and lily petalled arms mould 
into pleasing serpentine contour. 

Another sylvan fantasy of the lyre 
who is a veritable brochure of lovli- 
ness, is Miss Doris Stocker, a brunet- 
tish avalanche of verve and dash 
who hails from Monte Carlo, and 
whose dulcet trill lends a faint yet 
seductive undertone to the chorus 
stanzas in several of the ensemble 
numbers of "Tonight's the Night." 
Some of the most exacting sybarites 
of France and Italy have acclaimed 
her the futurist type of beauty. 

Prom the quaint seclusivtness of 
Rotterdam comes Miss Gertrude La- 
arhoven, a buxom Hollandese with 
ruddy countenance and deep-set byrl 
eyes that flint with all the lustre of 
a new coined Byzantinee. Through- 
out Queen Wilhelmina's realm Miss 
Laarhoven's beauty has been ac- 
corded boundless ecnomium, and 
she represents the very acme of 
Jugend poster girls. Her erubescent 
beauty has for the last three years 
been the subject of fervent paeans 
and panegyrics by young British 
and American visitors to the Neth- 
erlands, who have glimpsed her por- 
traits. 

The gilded dragon splendor of the 
Orient contributes Miss Edith Han- 
burry, a kaleidoscopic vision of ex- 
quisite grace, who comes of British 
parentage and who has spent most 
of her time behind the footlights in 
the empire of the Mikado and in 
the environment of Pekin. Refresh- 
ed by the sweet scent of lotus blos- 
soms and inspired by the accom- 
paniment of bamboo wind instru- 
ments, Miss Hanbury introduced 
dryadlike, a repertoire of some of 
the voguish dance evolutions in 
imperial celestial social circles. She 
is a bewitching young woman of 
twenty-two summers, and can ehat 
Japanese with all the fluency of a 
native Nipponite or pass compli- 
ments of the day in the tongue of 
the Mongolian. 

While this whirlwind of charm is 
the most mooted topic of Broadway 



it is well to dwell upon the elfin 
jubilance of Miss Gypsy O'Brien, 
she of the kinnikinic colored tresses 
and reedlike exiguity, whose par- 
ticular hobby is sparkling carra- 
geen slippers. Gypsy was born in 
Dublin, and she smacked the fam- 
ous blarneystone when a school- 
girl in short frocks. Her mien sug- 
gests the fragrance of the jasmine 
and jonquil, mingled with the 
peony and poinsettia, but retain- 
ing withal the verdant tang of the 
shamrock. 

These beauties have, of course, 
many admirers among whom rumor 
has strongly mentioned certain 
married and unmarried society men 
of San Francisco. 



REVENUES FLOP 

The Underwood tariff and the 
dropping off of imports since the 
beginning of the war left the Gov- 
ernment finances at the end of 1914 
in a very unsatisfactory state. 
Whether or not the Government 
bond issue will have to be resort- 
ed to cannot be determined for 
several months. Officials of the 
Treasury Department entertain 
strong hopes of an increase in the 
current year's receipts from the in- 
come tax, which taken with the 
extra revenue now being collected 
from the war stamps, may wipe out 
a big deficit carried over into the 
new year. 

However that may be, the last 
day of 1914 ended with a shortage 
of $35,000,000 in (current /revenues 
as compared with the first six 
months of the previous fiscal year. 
In custom receipts, there was a loss 
of $50,000,000 in the half year, but 
about $15,000,000 of this was made 
up by increased receipts from the 
Corporation and Income Tax, and 
from miscellaneous other sources. 
The war taxes made up a good 
share of the increased Internal 
Revenue. 

The drop in revenues was not al- 
lowed to interfere with the usual 
expenditures, which for the half- 
year were $380,000,000, an increase of 
$11,000,000. The result was that De- 
cember ended with an excess of dis- 
bursements over receipts of about 
$80,000,000. The new trraiff was in 
effect for three months of the earlier 
half-year and only $7,000,000 of the 
current year's deficit can be proper- 
ly ascribed to the lower duties un- 
der the new tarriff. 

Nearly all of the Corporation and 
Income tax, which is expected to 
produce $80,000,000, is collected in 
the later half of the year and the 
Government will have the benefit 
of the emergency war taxes for the 
full six months. It is estimated that 
the Government will receive $59,000,- 
000 from the operation of the new 
taxes in the first seven months. In 
the first month of the emergency 
war tax the amount received was 
equal to the revenues for the four 
months under the Spanish war 
taxes. 

There is some talk already of the 
sale of Panama Canal bonds to 
meet a deficit, but nothing will be 
done along this line until the Treas- 



Saturday, February 6, 1915 



THE WASP 



ury Department has had an oppor- 
tunity to tost out the possibilit- 
ies of a recovery In the second half 
year. At tin- present rate the Gov- 
eminent will realize $50,000,000 be- 
tween now and June 30 from the 
war taxes. This, with the Income 
tax. should wipe out most of the 
accumulated deficit 



An Oakland Meditation 

'I'll Utor of The Was]) places be- 
fore his readers the following only 
because it was written by a young 
society man across the bay noted 
for the number of his "affairs," It 
show.- the psychology of excuse, the 
"beauty in ugliness" creed of a 
Handsome Harry. Apparently it 
lias no limits. 

"The chief problem of our lives 
seems to be one of motive. We are 
eternally asking of ourselves, con- 
sciously, or unconsciously, "what 
shall I do?" And this question is 
answered by intelligent or unintelli- 
gent acts, in the ratio of our phys- 
ical and mental fitness for inde- 
pendent and original movement. 

Motives present themselves to us 
in a confusion amidst the activities 
of life, and are constantly forcing 
themselves on our attention, forc- 
ing us to recognize them sometimes 
against our wills, literally trying 
to make us do things at times we, in 
the cold light of Reason, would not 
do. 

Under intelligent and fearless 
handling the motives bequeathed 
to us by our brute ancestors are to 
be developed and transformed into 
forces the very opposite of animal. 

The motive of 'Curiosity,' in the 
minds of many great thinkers trans- 
formed into the faculty of acquir- 
ing knowledge, has been a tremen- 
dous force in the development of 
man. Essentially intermingled with 
our desire to live is our desire to 
know the new and strange about 
life. After we have assimilated a 
sufficient amount of experiences and 
impressions, we begin to develop a 
memory, and to draw conclusions 
from those experiences and impres- 
sions. And here we reier: the poii,.t 
where tl>< "1) tract nc^v n of Beauty 
holds us to .■•ui:i» thinss more tV a 
others ::i our intcrcou".«e with the 
world physic il and mental. 

We reject things because we do 
not like them. Ill other words, 
they have no Beauty in our per- 
ception of them. But as the rang'.- 
of thought becomes wider and more 
clear in meaning, all things begin 
to take an atmosphere of Beauty; 
even the horrible things and the 
painful things. Eor we are begin- 
ning to realize their power in life. 



Limited and Unlimited 

Passenger— Is this a limited train, 
porter? 

Porter— Yessah; dat is, 'cept as re- 
spects the porter's tip, sah. 
* # # * 

Polly— She said she had to marry 
him to get rid of him. 
Dolly— And how did it work out? 
Polly— Splendid! You see he be- 
longs to six clubs. 




QUARTER HOUR ^KETCHE S 
WOR.TH WHILE 



AKKANGED and /ELECTED fro™ <A. 

PRIVATE COLLECTION of Ma. JOHN H TOLLCY 

Ma. JOHN A. THOR.NBY for tA. 

A/P TUBL1/HINC COMPANY 




NOT A LILT MAID 

By 

Todd Carson 

If we are not willfully blind, if we 
have eyes that see, we must admit 
that man is not a monogamistic 
creature. Even well-tamed litera- 
ture allows a man two loves; his 
wife and 'the other woman!' That's 
not fair, however, its not holding 
the mirror up to the times, its stint- 
ing the man and giving 'the other 
woman' an undeserved place in the 
spotlight. It is high time some- 
one exposed that 'other woman;' she 
has flaunted her way through best 
sellers long enough. She's become 
too frightful a menace, she's the 
zeppelin of the matrimonial sky! 
She is frightening faithful wives in- 
to beauty parlors and to —every 
woman who has been married ten 
years knows what. And it's all 
wasted effort 'the other woman' is 
such a transitory thing, she's just 
a feminine something that most 
men have and get over like any 
other mild contagion, but the other 
woman, the one who catches his 
heart in the rebound; she's differ- 
ent! 

Elaine was not a lily maid nor 
was she clothed like the lilies of 
the valley. She worked. She was 
good enough to allow men to be 
nice to her if they were not too dis- 
tasteful to her. 

Don't get the wrong impression of 
Elaine, she was respectable she 
wouldn't allow men of her own sta- 
tion to take the slightest privileges 
with her. If the Fates, who are 
kind to the Elaines, had been busy 
or careless and had allowed Elaine 
to be caught in an immoral whim- 
sicality, she wouldn't have crept 
behind that well-worn pillar "I'm 
an unmoral Child." She would have 
said "I'm sorry your eyes are so bad, 
you really should see an oculist." 
Elaine always maintained appear- 
ances. 

He, (wouldn't be in this true tale 
if he didn't have a wife) was plum 
bored and had arrived. An agree- 
able man, opulent, and forty-five. 
His ideals were high, for middle-age, 
his ethics as pertaining to his pro- 
fession irreproachable. One thing 
only was awry a youthfulness beset 
him and clamored for just one more 
fling at romance. He had married 
too young before the romantic virus 
was worked out of his system. 

He met Elaine in a casual way, 
liked her, thought her provocative, 
pursued her until Elains counted 
him one of her followers. They 
committed occasional careless crimes 
together for which Elaine was the 
richer. He proposed that Elaine al- 
low him to furnish a flat for her. 
She was very indignant. "Brand 
myself, be known as your girl, well 
I guess not," she blazed. That 



settled the matter, things drifted 
along pleasantly until Elaine had 
an opportunity to go to a distant 
city. She went and into different 
surroundings. 

She met a man, soon after her ar- 
rival, a sex-dry. shriveled shrimp of 
a man who forced himself into her 
life and taught her to think. She 
began to crave knowledge. He 
guided her into learning's ways tor 
the sexless pleasure of seeing her 
expand mentally. Three years pas- 
sed and he went to a better world 
leaving her the ability to think for 
herself and some money. 

Elaine decided to return to her 
home city and look HIM up, he 
had become HIM with the advent 
of a change of values. She valued 
him now as an intellectual giant 
and craved to establish their old 
relations, only she wanted them 
closer now. Elaine was still a wor- 
shipper of things as they are but 
she had put one side, her old fetich, 
respectability. 

He was frankly glad to see her 
again. They resumed their old re- 
lations only now she enjoyed him 
more and he enjoyed her less. She 
talked too well, so lead his mind 
away from the things he wanted to 
think about when with her. She 
proposed the flat this time and was 
startled into the consciousness that 
life plays us queer tricks when he 
told her he was in love with an- 
other woman. "But why are you 
here?" Elaine flung at him. "Be- 
cause I'm fond of you, dear," was his 
answer in an offended tone. Elaine 
was big enough to smile: she knew 
men. 

Elaine, woman-like, was now con- 
vinced that he was the one and 
only man she could love and being 
wise in the lore of women who un- 
derstand men she accepted what he 
was willing to give. She listened 
while he raved about the other 
woman and never made a 'catty' re- 
mark. She just waited and was 
sweet always and willing to please 
for she knew, none better, that the 
other woman is a transitory thing. 

When the expected happened, 
when the wife found the other wom- 
an's paid bills in his pocket and 
rushed to her lawyer and demanded 
a divorce, waving her proof, when 
publicity threatened like a great 
devouring vulture, when the scar- 
let word was bandied back and 
forth, when the other woman went 
home to a complacent mother who 
welcomed her as a daughter about 
to make a fine match; he returned 
to Elaine for comfort. Turned to 
Elaine the cool, the dispassionate, 
who listened while he poured out 
his heart. He told her over and 
over again, and she never tired lis- 
tening, how he had come to wander 
so far from the wife of his youth, 



the woman he had recklessly sworn 
to forswear all women for. when he 
was twenty-one 

Elaine understood and comforted 
him. she bolstered up his self-esteem 
when it was in danger of toppling 
over. She pointed out that happi- 
ness, real happiness, was to be 
found only at his wife's side sur- 
rounded by old friends and accus- 
tomed things. He tried hard to 
patch things up with his wife, but 
she wouldn't listen, she couldn't un- 
derstand: she was of the marrying 
brand. She forgot, or overlooked, 
the things she had denied: the 
children she denied birth. She had 
changed with the knowledge of 'the 
other woman' from an indolent self- 
ish woman to an avenging domestic 
fury. She wanted 'the other woman' 
exposed. The other woman" want- 
ed to be exposed so she might leap 
into her place in the sun. 

The divorce was granted the wile, 
the man was hurt professionally be- 
yond repair, the wife was an em- 
bittered lonely woman who had 
had her way. 'The other woman' 
demanded marriage, but a little epi- 
sode with a young floorwalker that 
his lawyers found out about made 
her willing to take a settlement. 
She married the floorwalker who 
flirted whenever and wherever he 
dared without regard to his wife's 
feelings. 

What happened to Elaine? What 
the Fates had been planning. He 
turned more and more to Elaine 
as old friends grew cold and old ties 
loosened until one day they were 
married and started out to search 
for happiness together. 

The moral of this unmoral tale? 
There isn't any; it's just true. 



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Store 5, Cor. Carl and Cole Streets 
Store 6, Cor. Union and Steiner Streets 
Store 7. Cor. Powell and Sutter Streets 



THE WASP 



Saturday, February 6, 1915 



THE WOMAN BEAUTIFUL 




By Catharine Carroll 

In an operetta popular several sea- 
sons ago there were many Quaker 
maidens, and every one who saw it 
commented on the beauty of their 
gowns— modified, to be sure, but 
still modeled on the frock of the 
Quaker maid. Now that wide-skirt- 
ed frocks with narrow bodices, seem 
to be coming gradually in fashion, 
perhaps the Quaker costume will 
receive some consideration. One 
American designer has already feat- 
ured it. 

-X- # & * 

Have you seen the drum muff? 
There is one. It is small and drum- 
shaped and it is worn about the 
neck on a chain of gold galloon. It 
should be worn with a military, 
braided costume. 

There are some interesting import- 
ed coats made of big shawls or 
steamer rugs, with fringe around 
the bottom and edging the cape 
section that falls over the sleeves, 
or sometimes edging the wide col- 
lar instead. 

* -» * -x- 

In spite of the very long waist, 
which is without doubt the feature 
of the winter models, there are some 
very short Empire waists. They are 
generally becoming, always well-lik- 
ed by the wearer. These new ones 
end almost under the arms. 

* # # * 

Those men, so many in San Fran- 
cisco, who have given up loving 
their wives, might well ponder over 
the tribute of George Young to 
Madame Nordica, his wife, who died 
last May. 

"Mme. Nordica was always to me 
a child, in the simplicity of her 
heart, the sincerity of her emotions. 
She would have been a great artist 
in whatever field she went. The 
quality of soul that made that true 
is the quality that made her always 
a child to me, though I was a man 
of 45 at the time of our marriage, 
and she was older. 

"This quality appeared, I think, 
in ever line that ever came from her 
to me." 

|S Telephone Douglas 5712 § 

| Jackson & Merwin I 

£ EXCLUSIVE I 

I HAIR SHOP § 

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cS fCccommodations for 9ffen S 

| 78 GEARY STREET | 

£ San Francisco t* 



Aristocratic Visitors 

Society is making preparations for 
the gayest year ever recorded as yet 
in the social history of California. 
With the opening of the Panama 
Pacific International Exposition 
the months will be one long series 
of festivals. 

Close on the heels of the opening 
of the Exposition comes the Polo 
Tournament which begins March 
15th and continues until April 26th. 
There will be three matches played 
weekly on the Exposition Polo 
Field, which, besides being an ex- 
cellent battle-ground for the cham- 
pionships from the viewpoint of the 
audience, affords an incomparable 
outlook upon a panorama of sea 
and hill and sky and Jeweled 
domes. 

For some time it was feared that 
on account of the trouble across 
the water, there would be no visit- 
ing nobility. This, of course, was a 
great disappointment to the Coun- 
try Club set. But now word has 
been received through private cor- 
respondence that quite a few of 
England's proudest aristocrats will 
be present some time during the 
Polo Tournament. The Earl of El- 
gin, Sir James Wilson, Countess of 
Leven, Duke of Leinster, Sir John 
Carey of Guernsey and Mr. Alan Mc- 
Donald of Banff, N. B„ have writ- 
ten to their friends here that they 
will be here early in March and will 
remain for some time. 

Also it has been learned that 
many of the families of English no- 
bility will pass the spring and sum- 
mer in San Francisco as their own 
summer places in Switzerland, 
France, Italy and the Tyrol are in- 
accessible on account of the war. 

Some of the American polo play- 
ers of national and international 
fame who are in Southern Califor- 
nia en route to this city are Max 
Stevenson, Perry Beadlestone, Pad 
Rumsey and Kitty Van Stade of 
the Cooperstown Team. With the 
Midwick team will be Freddy Mc- 
Laughlin of Chicago and Hugh 
Drury, the latter having gained 
laurels both in England and India. 

From Cincinnati has come Max 
Fleischman with a long string of 
ponies. J. Langford Stack of Chi- 
cago and Thomas le Boutellier of 
Meadowbrook are also on their way 
West. 

Foxhall Keene, accompanied by 
his family, and Rene La Montagne, 
of the Meadowbrook team, will be 
here throughout the Polo Tourna- 
ment and may remain over for the 
Harness Races in June. 



Song of the Dying 

We've fought for their crowns and 
sceptres, 
We've died that their heirs might 

live, 
For we had a life to give. 
The blood of a thousand thous 
and 
Was shed in the stroke of a pen: 
At their nod we were slaves in liv 
ing, 
But they let us die like men. 

William Wright 




Clubdom is keenly interested this 
week in the coming production by 
the Players' Club, to take place in 
Scottish Rite Auditorium on Fri- 
day evening, February 12. The play 
will be "The Sunken Bell", Haupt- 
mann's fantastical fairy drama, 
which E. H. Sothern first pro- 
duced in the United States several 
years ago. 

Much care has been exercised in 
the selection of the cast and mem- 
bers of the club predict that this 
will be the best production ever 
given by that organization. 

Among the well-known amateur 
thespians in the cast are Francis P. 
Buckley, Florence Hoffman, Lucy A. 
Smith, Craig W. Ward, George W. 
Ryder, Raphael J. Polk Carolyn 
Caro, Pauline Hillenbrand, William 
S. Rainey, Evangeline Gilmore, 
Olive Gwynne, Pauline Hobler, Haz- 
el Hollingsworth, Aileen Buckley 
and Virginia Whithead. 

* -X- * -X- 

Mrs. Florence Richmond, presi- 
dent of the Papyrus Club, acted 
as hostess at an informal members' 
day held by that organization Wed- 
nesday afternoon. A musical and 
dramatic program will be presented 
by the club on the third Wednes- 
day of the month. 

-X- -X -X -X- 

George Randolph Chester, the 
well-known author, and Mrs. Ches- 
ter, were guests of honor at a din- 
ner in the Sequoia Club home Sun- 
day evening. Harr Wagner, presi- 
dent of the Sequoia Club, presid- 
ed and was assisted by a large 
number of members in entertain- 
ing the honored guests.: 

"How the Associated Press Col- 
lects the News of the World" was 
the subject of a highly interesting 
and educating address delivered be- 
fore the California Club Tuesday 
afternoon by Arthur Copp, head of 
the local division of the Associated 
Press. 

Musical numbers added to the 
day's program. 

-X- * * * 

A novel program of high quality 
entertained the members of the To 
Kalon Club at their meeting Tues- 
day. Miss Dorothy Leontine Demp- 
ster rendered excerpts from the 
"Love Letters of a Musician" to a 
violin and piano accompaniment. 
Miss Edna Horan played the vio- 
lin accompaniment while Miss Lois 
Park was heard at the piano. 

Miss Ethel Johnson was heard in 
vocal solos and selections on the 
violin were rendered by Miss Edna 
Moran. 

A number of merry dinner parties 
preceded a delightful dance which 



took place at the Concordia Club 
last Sunday evening. The ball- 
room was artistically decorated and 
many gay couples enjoyed the 
dance. 

Among those presiding o%'er din- 
ner parties before the affair were 
Mr. and Mrs. Juiius Feigenbaum. 
Twenty-four guests accepted their 
hospitality. The affair was given in 
honor of Miss Kline, who is visiting 
from Waterloo. 



Many San Franciscans motored 
down the peninsula last Saturday 
night to enjoy the beefsteak din- 
ner at the Beresford Club. The af- 
fair was a brilliant success and 
much merriment reigned. The af- 
fair was given to entertain the par- 
ticipants in the club's New Year's 
eve program. 



The Press Club committee in 
charge of the "Nine Years After" 
show to be given Saturday evening, 
April 17, at the Municipal Auditor- 
ium, received word this week from 
Arthur Bennett, now in the East 
in the interests of the affair, that 
he has purchased thousands of dol- 
lars worth of costumes, scenery and 
other accessories. 

Meanwhile arrangements here are 
progressing rapidly. This year's 
show will be a great pageant, in 
which fully a thousand men and 
women in dazzling attire will par- 
ticipate. 

Arrangements are in the hands 
of a committee consisting of Clyde 
C. Westover (chairman), Waldemar 
de Bille, Peter B. Kyne, William H. 
Barry, Arthur Bennett, W. R. Dav- 
enport, Thomas F. Boyle and H. H. 
Dempsey. 



P. V. Marraia. 

President 



Julius Fppstci 
Secretary 



jirt floral Company 

Incorporated 

HOTEL ST. FRANCIS 

225 POWELL ST., SAN PEANOISCO 

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and avoid annoyance and incon- y 
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you wish to see far or near, as the 
case may be. Both the reading and 
distance corrections are combined. 

Mayerle's Glasses 

are highly recommended for read- 
ing, working or to see at a dis- 
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strained, tired, itchy, watery, in- 
flamed, gluey eyes, floating spots, 
crusty or granulated eyelids, 
cross eyes, astigmatism, headache, 
dizziness, children's eyes and com- 
plicated cases of eye defects. Two 
gold medals and diploma of honor 
awarded at California Industrial 
Exposition, also at Mechanics' 
Fair, October, 1913, to 

GEORGE MAYERLE 

Graduate German Expert Optician 

Established 20 Tears 

960 Market St., San Francisco 

Opposite the Empress Theatre 

Mayerle Eyewater at Druggists' 

50c; by mail 65c 



Saturday, February 6, 1915 



THE WASP 



9 




By John C. Observer. 



On Raising Hotel Rates 

Here is a story with a moral. It is 
lining the rounds of San Francisco 
hotels this week as a profound les- 
son to hotel keepers against rais- 
ing their rates during the Exposi- 
tion year. It is a tale of one hotel 
owner who experimented with high- 
er rates— and lost. 

This owner, whose hostelry is 
well-known, recently decided that 
he might bring more gold into his 
coffers by raising rates during the 
Exposition period. Visitors to the 
Exposition will not object to a 
slight increase, he thought. 

The house was filled and the grill 
was doing a capacity business. But 
in spite of this, the manager direct- 
ed that all guests be notified that 
after February 1st their rates would 
be increased, some 50 per cent and 
others nearly 100 per cent. 

The announcement was received 
with little comment. So little was 
said that the owner began shak- 
ing hands with himself. A splen- 
did success, he thought. 

But he was not happy long. A 
few days later two guests moved 
out. Next day three others went. 
The exodus continued until a week 
later say only a dozen guests were in 
the place. These had paid their 
room rent for a month in advance. 

Fortunately for them, they had 
not paid for board. So they for- 
sook the hotel's grill and found as 
good an eating place around the 
corner. It is a small restaurant but 
the angered guests preferred it to 
the commodious and beautifully 
frescoed dining room of the hotel. 

So the grill remains empty, the 
little restaurant is doing an in- 
creased business, and the remain- 
ing six guests at the hotel have giv- 
en notice of their departure as soon 
as their time is up. 



Which Fire Board 
While Mayor Rolph's new board 
of fire commissioners is holding the 
reins of the department apparently 
unconcerned about the legal fight of 
the ousted commissioners for rein- 
statement, two men who seek no of- 
fice from either board, are waiting 
impatiently with increasing sus- 
pense for the court to decide which 
commission is entitled to office. 

The anxious two are Wooster J. 
Taylor and George Meyer, former 
newspaper men and publishers of 
a new municipal blue book. 



For months these two enterpris- 
ing scribes have been busily engag- 
ed in the task of compiling the new 
volume, obtaining photographs of 
the members of San Francisco's offi- 
cial family, and writing biographies 
galore. 

It was a huge task but the two 
publishers kept at their work night 
and day, turning out page after 
page of copy on the lives of muni- 
cipal office-holders. 

Eventually the work was finished, 
cuts were made of all photographs 
and every line of copy was edited. 
Heaving great sighs of relief, Taylor 
and Meyer took their manuscript 
to the printers. It was set into type 
the forms were closed, and put on 
the press. 

But just at the beginning of the 
action, the ax fell in San Francisco 
officialdom and four recalcitrant 
fire commissioners were scrambling 
out of office. 

Undaunted by the sudden shake- 
up, the blue book publishers 
quickly "wrote up" the new com- 
missioners, secured their photos, 
and were ready to make the neces- 
sary change when the ousted com- 
missioners, brought their case into 
court, claiming that their removal 
was unlawful and that they still 
were entitled to hold their places. 

The case was submitted but the 
wheels of justice move slowly and 
no decision yet has come from 
Judge Seawell. 

But in the meantime, the new 
municipal blue book lingers dole- 
fully on the press, ready tor publi- 
cation but with two separate pages 
set for the city's fire commission. 
Until the publishers know which 
board is legally in office, the blue 



book is doomed to reluctant re- 
pose. 

X Ray's Light Is Out 
The powerful gleam of The X-Ray is 
no more. Its piercing shafts of light 
are dimmed forever. No longer will 
its penetrating light be cast over 
the community for The X-Ray is 
but a memory. 

All of which is intended to con- 
vey the news that San Francisco's 
latest weekly publication, "The 
X-Ray," referred to in one of the 
big dailies as a "provocative period- 
ical" is out of business. Its owner. 
publisher and editor, Harry A. 
Hargrave, has left San Francisco for 
the East, with his destination vari- 
ously reported as Chicago, by some 
and New York, by others. 

At any rate Hargrave has left San 
Francisco free from the kick-back 
from his X-Ray, free to pursue the 
quiet tenor of his ways without ex- 
ploitation in his latest addition to 
the journalistic field. 

His sudden departure with his 
wife followed the dismissal in Po- 
lice Court of the cases of Eddie 
Graney, Carlton Wall, Matt Tierneq 
and John Birmingham, whose ar- 
rest on charges of misdemeanor con- 
spiracy was brought about by Har- 
grave. 

But when it came time to prose- 
cute the four, whom the editor 
claimed had paid a threatening vis- 
it to his apartments, Hargrave 
calmly telephoned the district At- 
torney's office that he had failed to 
secure counsel to represent him and 
would not prosecute the cases. 

Whereupon Attorney Thomas 
O'Connor, for the defendants, spoke 
a few harsh words about Hargrave. 
Those words, uttered in O'Connor's 




We carry a full line of Japanese 

Silks, Kimonos, Mandarin 

Coats, Linen Goods, etc. 

MAIN STORE 

157 GEARY STREET 

Bet. Stockton and Grant Ave. 
Phone Douglas 4628 

SAN FRANCISCO, CALIFORNIA 



111 E. COLORADO ST. 
Pasadena, Cal. 

Factory Office : Yokohama. Japan. 



inimitable style, seemed to have ex- 
tinguished the once-powerful light 
of the X-Ray for since then the 
luminous shafts have been dimmed 
forever. 

* * * # 

Redlights Gleam for 1915 

'I'lir luck of the tenderloin prop- 
erty owners, in being able to keep 
their property open with red lights 
agleam during a part of the Expo- 
sition year, at least, and in spite of 
the new abatement law, is causing 
much gossip and reflection about 
town these days. 

On all sides ,it is the general con- 
census of opinion that the owners 
of redlight property in San Fran- 
cisco are decidedly in luck and that 
the slowness of the law's machinery 
will turn gold into their pockets. 

When the fight against the red- 
light abatement law first was 
launched, the interests leading the 
attack sought to hold the statute 
in abeyance at least during the Ex- 
position year, even if its enforce- 
ment after that time could not be 
averted. 

They saw before them the rich op- 
portunities for easy money when 
San Francisco is crowded with 
world's fair visitors, when money is 
spent freely, and the sights of the 
"Paris of America" are seen for the 
first time by the stranger. 

First the fight was taken to the 
Superior Court, but with no suc- 
cess. Superior Judge Sturtevant, in 
the test case involving the Casa 
Company, declared constitutional 
that portion of the statute refer- 
ring to tenderloin resorts. 

So the redlight interests, undaunt- 
ed, took the case into the tSate Su- 
preme Court on appeal. The State 
Supreme Court is a busy tribunal 
with cases just as important far 
ahead on the calendar. So the de- 
cision, attorneys say, cannot come 
much before June, If it does come 
that soon, and in the meantime en- 
forcement of the law is deferred and 
the redlights still glow. 

If the State Supreme Court up- 
holds Judge Sturtevant the case 
will be carried still higher, it is 
announced, for the interests say 
now that they will take their fight 
to the United States Supreme 
Court, if necessary. 

However, should the State Court 
uphold the statute, it is considered 
probable that the authorities then 
may proceed with the enforcement 
of the law despite further appeal. 
In which case the redlight owners 
will have reaped the profits from 
the Exposition crowds for four 
months. But general opinion is 
that the redlights will gleam 
throughout the Exposition year. 



Jean Guifirey Coming 
A letter from Jean Guifirey, form- 
er curator of paintings at the Mu- 
seum .of Fine Arts, New York, an- 
nounces that he has been appoint- 
ed commissioner for the French de- 
partment of fine arts at the Pana- 
ma-Pacific Exposition. He is about 
to sail from France for this country 
and will come direct to San Fran- 
cisco. 



10 



THE WASP 



Saturday, February 6, 1915 




In Old New Mex. 

Tor why, senor, you lose good sleep 

For wars across the sea? 
For why these bitter tears you 
weep? 

Be calm, senor, like me. 
This 'dobe wall is nice and warm, 

Our day dreams none can vex; 
Come smoke and yield you to her 
charm, 

This sunny old New Mex. 

'Tis bad, senor, that men are fools, 

But why should you be too? 
Here is the place where anger cools, 

Sit here, with me by you; 
Sit here and smoke and watch the 
flocks 

That graze upon the plain; 
What though the earth with tu- 
mult rocks, 

Why should it cause us pain? 

The white clouds race like ships 
above, 
Their shadows race beneath; 
The distant shepherd sings of love. 
My smoke floats, wreath on 
wreath; 
Come then, and dream of what you 
will; 
King Care can ne'er annex 
This 'dobe paradise, sans thrill, 
In sunny old New Mex. 

— Arthur Chapman. 
-x- * * -x- 

A Roosevelt in Love 

Chaffing Isabelle McBirney, 
daughter of the Hugh McBirneys, 
of Lake Forest on the open admir- 
ation she is receiving from young 
Douglas Robinson, of New York, 
constitutes one of the pastimes of 
her friends. Robinson is a nephew 
of Theodore Roosevelt and is said 
to be hot on the heels of the fascin- 
ating Isabelle, who up to now has 
eluded all pursuers for her hand 
and heart. She has talent as an 
actress and has been called, next to 
Mrs. John Carpenter, the most versa- 
tile girl in Chicago society. 
-x- ■>:- * * 

People You Know 

At the opening night of the Opera 
in New York, the beauty of every 
debutante paled before Mrs. Oliver 
Harriman's loveliness. She arrived 
early and her black gown, with cor- 
sage bouquet of white orchids, was 
ravishing. She remains as when 
her beauty was first toasted. 

The women of the Gould family 
evidently have decided to wear 
white satin as the uniform of the 
clan. Mrs. Jay Gould and Mrs. Geo. 
J. were in plain white satin, the se- 



verity of their snowy garb bring- 
ing out the gorgeousness of the blue 
gown worn by Mrs. Harry Lehr— 
the blue she so often wears to 
match her sapphires. Douglas Rob- 
inson was the jolliest man in the 
horseshoe. He made the rounds 
faithfully, his jocularity increasing 
with every call, and when he 
reached the box in which his daugh- 
ter-in-law, Mrs. Theodore Douglas 
Robinson, sat he was in a state 
of high good humor. He and Cor- 
inne seem to understand each other 
well, for they had a specially good 
joke between them, and after an 
outburst of laughter Corinne gave 
her father-in-law a little slap and 
he very coyly slapped back — the 
flippant young boy! Angelica Ger- 
ry, too, was in a gay mood, and the 
first woman in the parterre to leave, 
with a very pretty young girl, full 
of titter, who was under her wing. 



Old Fie-for-Shame 

Born in the last year of the reign 
of Charles IV., Lord Feversham, who 
died a few days ago, had lived to 
see five sovereigns occupy the 
throne of England. He was a noted 
Lothario in his younger days, and 
in his riper years was known as 
"old Fie-for shame." He was a man 
who even under the most trying 
circumstances never forgot the re- 
spect he considered due to his 
rank. It was related how, on one 
occasion, coming down rather early 
in the morning to the library at 
Dunscombe Park, his seat in York- 
shire, he found a very pretty house- 
maid lighting the fire. True to his 
traditions, he made love to the 
charming girl, and she in a mo- 
ment of amorousness dared to 
murmur "Oh, my darling!" Where- 
upon Lord Feversham drew himself 
up stiffly and reprovingly said 
"None of that damned familiarity!" 
Two of his daughters were famous 
for their beauty, the late Duchess 
of Leinster and Lady Helen Vincent. 



Germanic Modes 

It is understood that a conven- 
tion of German tailors is now in 
session at Frankfort to decide upon 
new fashions for both men and 
women. 

The German convention, the cor- 
respondent says, purposes to set 
different fashions than those adopt- 
ed by the Paris and London mod- 
istes and tailors. 



Old Brocade 

A note of sadness in the uncover- 
ing of old documents and love epi- 
sodes of Mrs. Frank Leslie is that 
no one appears to renember or 
speak of the days when she also 
was "a pet of the press." The news- 
papers helped her to gather up the 
threads of an insolvent business 
and make a success of it. It was 
the widow of Frank Leslie who took 
the name and had the courage to 
branch out into new ideas and il- 
lustrations that had not been tried 
before, and who paid off the debts 
of the publication and really made 
the fortune which now the relatives 
are quarreling over and to get are 
smirching her name. If these facts 
exist at all as they are now set 
forth, why was not the power of 
them used before Mrs. Leslie's 
death for a rightful distribution of 
the property? Anyone who knew 
Mrs. Frank Leslie and her pride 
knows that, while she paid little 
attention to gossip, she would have 
gone poor during life rather than 
to have been so dragged in the dust 
of scandal from "record evidence." 



She Will Be Here 
Save for entertainments by the 
Pezets and Spring Rices, the daugh- 
ter of Sir Robert Hart, that clever 
Englishman who was for so amny 
years at the head of the Chinese 
customs, passed through Washing- 
ton without making any very great 
stir, not a single fashionable hostess 
dreaming what a lioness she had 
let slip through her fingers until 
Mrs. Beauclerk was gone. The Pezets 
are old friends and knew her inti- 
mately when her husband, the late 
William Beauclerk, was British 
Minister at Lima. He was a grand- 
son of the eighth Duke of St. Al- 
bans, a clever diplomatist and an 
authority on Spanish-American af- 
fairs, and is pleasantly remembered 
in Washington, where he served in 
the early days of his diplomatic ap- 
prenticeship on the staff of Lord 
Sackville. While he was secretary of 
the Legation at Pekin he met and 
married Evelyn Hart, who was the 
belle of the British colony both be- 
cause of her charm and her great 
wealth. Mrs. Beauclerk, with her 
daughter Vere, is on her way to 
China by way of California. 

Properly Represented 

American Ambassadors and Min- 
isters to European countries are do- 
ing the diplomatic work of the 
world. Fortunately, some of these 
envoys are literary men, and at a 
later time their memoirs on the 
men and events of the great war will 
form a priceless historical and lit- 
erary heritage. There is Dr. Henry 
van Dyke at The Hague, Brand 
Whitlock at Brussels, in the very 
thick of the fray; Walter Page, for- 
mer editor of the World's Work, at 
London, and Thomas Nelson Page, 
the novelist, at Rome. Diplomats 
who are also literary men are worth 
while, particularly in times like 
these. 




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THE 



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Your present Piano accepted as 
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26 O'Farrell Street 

Oakland Store 473 12th Street 

Bacon Block 



Saturday, February 6, 1915 



THE WASP 



Ins and Outs of the Social World 



(Continued from pape 



All in the Game 

Dainty little Miss Elinor Tay. 
pretty Mrs. Fred Han-haw's daugh- 
ter, is much in the social limelight 
these days, and while she has not 
made a formal debut, she is contest- 
ing the leadership of the debutan- 
tes nidi the iin j - 1 experienced belles. 
Mis- Tay is a demiblonde and while 
not so exquisitely pretty as her fas- 
cinating little blonde mother she 

lias none the less decided claims to 

beauty. 1 can recall an amusing 
incident which occurred a good 
many years ago when .Mrs. Hen- 
Bhaw, who before she married the 
portly Judge, was Mrs. Charlie Tay, 
anil before that was Helen Walker, 
and the prettiest girl in her set, was 
engaged to Willie Whittier. She 
and Miss Lizzie Carroll were great 
friends. Milss Carroll was the be- 
trothed of Kedick Duperu and the 

quartette were istantly together. 

Then one fine day Miss Carroll an- 
nounced her engagement to the heir 
of the Whittier millions and folloy- 
ed it up by an immediate marriage. 
The day the wedding occurred Miss 
Walker and Mr. Duperu gave a 
"consolation dinner" and the affair 
gave the smart set something to- 
laugh over for weeks to come. 



Her Latest Favorite 
I notice that Mrs. Fred McNear 
has a new "dancing partner" and 
she and "Billy" Hamilton are cer- 
tainly some nifty little dancers. 
They are everywhere together, but 
the affair is quite above board as 
Friend husband is always in evi- 
dence and seems quite content to 
let the dashing Georgie play 
around with her new affinity as 
much as she chooses. The hand- 
some "Billy" is seen at all the 
smart set functions these days and 
seems quite to have recovered from 
his unfortunate marital affair. His 
wife was good looking "Mab" Mc- 
Donald of Santa Rosa, daughter of 
the wealthy Mark McDonald, but 
the marriage was not a happy one 
and the usual divorce occurred. 
Billy is a brother of the handsome 
Hamilton sisters, Clara, who mar- 
ried George Martin and Alexandra, 
now Mrs. Rudolph Schilling. His 
brother Ralston married the enor- 
mously wealthy Miss Ethel Lincoln, 
and in spite of some disparity in 
their ages, they seem ideally happy. 
Billy's little son is being brought 



N.Warshauer 



F.Warshauer 



Warshauer Brothers 

TAILORS 



49 Geary Street 

SAN FRANCISCO 



up by Ills Bister, .Mis> Laura Ham- 
ilton. 

• « • • 

An Interesting Man 
Society will have to do without 
dashing .Mrs. Hoy Mishop for a 
while to come as she has gone 
south for some weeks with her par- 
ents, Mr. and Mrs. Thomas Wheeler. 
Her father, the genial "Pop" Wheel- 
er, is a wealthy New Yorker, who is 
a well known member of the Stand- 
ard Oil family there. Mrs. Bishop 
is fair and very pretty with quanti- 
ties of blonde hair which she always 
wears beautifully waved. I saw her 
at the Fairmont dinner dance the 
other night in a lovely white gown 
with sea-green crystals which was 
vastly becoming. Mr. Bishop has 
a decidedly interesting career. He 
was a Decatur, Illinois boy, and 
was attending Cornell when the 
Spanish war broke out. He aban- 
doned his college plans, enlisted in 
Troop A of the Ohio cavalry, which 
was known as the Famous Black 
Horse Troop, and served as escort 
for both the inauguration and fun- 
eral of President McKinley. He 
laughs now when he tells how he 
was private in the rear rank and 
horse shoer of the troop which 
was composed of society and col- 
lege men. After the war Mr. Bishop 
entered Columbia and graduated a 
mining engineer. He had many in- 
teresting experiences in Siberia in 
the pursuit of his profession and 
also was for a time engaged in var- 
ious properties in Mexico. 

•>:• * * -::■ 

A Divorcee 111 

I hear that chic little Mrs. "Billy" 
de Boalt, Admiral Rowan's good- 
looking daughter, ^vho surprised 
society by filing a suit for divorce 
last week, is very ill in New York, 
and her condition is causing her 
friends no little anxiety. She re- 
turned from Paris to New York to 
have a delicate operation perform- 
ed upon her head and is quite crit- 
ically ill in a hospital there. 



Some Pretty Nurses 

I am glad that our society girls 
are not going to let the adventur- 
ous maidens in other parts of the 
world eclipse them in the useful 
art of nursing, and- that some twen- 
ty-five of them have joined Miss 
Betty Ashe's new class on "First 
Aid to the Injured" and are enter- 
ing heartily into the spirit of the 
new work. Miss Ashe herself took a 
course in trained nursing in order 
to properly carry on her work in 
the Telegraph Hill Settlement, to 
which she devotes her life. All kinds 
of bandages, care of the wounded, 
treatment of cuts and burns, forms 
the new course. I have not heard of 
any of the fair members are plan- 
ning to volunteer in actual service 
in the war zone, but they will be 
competent to lend a hand should 
the need arise. 



LIFE AS IT IS LIVED 
By Billee Glynn 

THE history of Robert Batter 
was much the same as that of 
many others. He had been 
born in the country, drifted to San 
Francisco, gone into business, then 
become engrossed in it, married 
somewhat before that, and. coin- 
paratively successful. continued 
hustling indefinitely because hust- 
ling had always appeared to him 
the Thing. Moreover he had proved 
it by the amount of his fortune. 
"I have only one life to live," was 
his favorite phrase. And certainly 
he lived it according to every ap- 
proved standard. 

Even with his wife and two chil- 
dren he talked business and uncon- 
sciously he had molded her to his 
point of view. Her youth, the sat- 
iny power of her womanhood, had 
greatly disappeared, but she un- 
derstood thoroughly the value of 
success and money. Thus with his 
own wife had he been successful. 
And, of course, he cared for her 
very deeply. He called her "Dear" 
and withheld every caress of the 
lover. She had been trained out of 
that or appeared to be. What car- 
essing there was went entirely to 
the two children— a boy and a girl. 
Though Robei-t Hatter, now that 
they were going to school, saw real- 
ly very little of them. But he al- 
ways thought of his boy as a mil- 
lionaire, a power in the business 
world. And it pleased him might- 
ily this vision of another Hatter 
like himself. 

With his ears he heard the brazen 
sounds of commerce; with his eyes 
he reckoned what was actual, ma- 
terial, sure, and consequently 
worth while. For he "had only one 
life to live." It was around that 
phrase that he thought and 
worked. He repeated it frequently. 
His preference at the theatre was 
broad humor and comic opera. He 
moved hastily through his pleas- 
ures and hastily despatched his 
meals. Baste had become a habit. 
Things went on like this till Rob- 
ert Hatter was fifty-five. Then came 
upon him a slight apoplectic stroke. 
Anyway he was about through. 
With that urgent phrase on his 
lips, "I have only one life to live," 
he had gone the speed limit and 
the hour limit. 

Meantime his son had come out 
of university, been set up in busi- 
ness, and lost his business through 
his fondness for pleasure. He had 
been twice married and twice di- 
vorced. Then an actress brought 
a breach-of-promise suit against 
him for a large amount and won it. 
It was then that Robert Hatter, 
angry and disgusted clean through, 
really had the heart to talk to his 
son, whom even in his thirties, he 
had still iookeu upon as a boy. 

" You have cost me already one 
hundred thousand dollars," he 
raged. "What do you mean by this 
sinful waste of money, this libertine 
life?" 



11 



Whereupon the son proved that 
he had inherited something. For, 
unconscious of it being his fathers 
pet philosophy, he replied to him 
seriously: "I have only one life to 
live." 



Easy to Stop losing- your temper 

when yon know how! Here Is the secret 
Nothing is more exasperating or annoy- 
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reading nor reading for distance. You 
lose your temper and probably hours of 
time until you get tin- proper glasses. 
By wearing the new- patented "Caltex 
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temper as hoth reading and distance cor- 
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...I nouceable dividing line — no rainbow 
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W. D. Fennimore \ \ \ I i A. R. Fennimore 

-Smwi^?/// 



immm\a 




181 Post Street 
2508 Mission St. 

1221 Broadway, Oakland 



San Francisco 



HHM01 

NEW YORK 

America's Latest and 
Most Refined and New 1 
York's Centermost Hotel 

| Only hotel occupying an entire city I 
, block, VanderblHand MadiaonAvs., 

43d and 44th Sts., adjoining Grand , 
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| 1000 rooms; 9o0 with bath— Itooni rates / 

i from $2.50 per day. Suites from •> 

to 15 rooms for permanent oceit- 

pancy. Large and small bull, bau- 

iq.uct and dining salons and suites 

specially arranged for public 

k or private functions 

^CustavBaumann, Pres 
John McE. Bowman 
Vice-Prcs 



* I 

,V Phone Douglas 5370 m 

I M. E. GALLAGHER f 

Ti Fancy, Street, Reception and Evening a 

| GOWNS I 

f j* j* at 4 

<| WEDDINQ TKOUSSEATJX K 

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& 96-97 WMttell Eldg., 166 Geary St. % 

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I The "Frances 

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5 MANICURING PARLORS. 
If 110 GEARY STREET. 
*£ Purchased and Now Conducted by 

I ?ffrs. J. Williams 

»w Formerly Manager Hair D.essing $ 

6 Dept., The Emporium. & 
Ic^ag8asSa3«<iS»oa»=««=3«03aa3»«(otfe|l 



12 



n 



THE WASP 



Saturday, February 6, 1915 



Cafe Notes 

The weekly luncheon of the Home 
Rule in Taxation League was held 
Wednesday at the Hofhrau with an 
unusually large number in attend- 
ance. The speaker of the affair was 
Rabbi Herman Rosenwasser of the 
Bush Street Synagogue, who took 
for his subject, "Social Problems in 
the Light of Israel's Prophets." 



AFTER THE THEATER 

For Good Fresh Oysters 

GOTO 

JOHN'S GRILL 

57 Ellis Street 

SPECIALTIES 

Oyster Loaves 

Lobsters — Oysters — Crab 

Stew — Steaks — Chops 

WILFRED J. CrIRARD, Prop 



iECHAU : TAVERN. 



Cor. Eddy and Powell Sts, 
Phone Douglas 4700 

A HIGH-CLASS 
FAMILY CAFE 

Where patrons are constantly surrounded 

by an air of refinement and respectability 

Informal Dansant Every Evening 1 at 

Nine Except Sunday 

Under the management of 

A. C MORRISON 



<«:^x^;**><^x^xk»:«xk**x**k»*><***k^> 



Odeon Cafe 

Market and Eddy Sts. 

San Francisco's Leading 
Restaurant 

£ Vaudeville Evening — 

Concert Afternoons 

A. BECKER, President 
A. J. BECKER, Manager 






J.-B. Pon J. Bergez 0. Lalanne 

C. Mailhebuau L. Coutard 



Bergez-f rank's 

OLD 




..Poodle Dog.. 

Hotel Co. 

and 

Restaurant 



Music and Entertainment Every Evening 

416-421 BUSH STREET 

(Above Kearny) 

SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 

Exchange Douglas 2411 



FEDERAL CLUB 

32 TURK STEEET 

San Francisco's Popular Rendezvous 

for Sportsmen 

Dance Hall Buffet 



At Fred Solari's 

To dine at Fred Solari's Grill on 
Geary Street, next to the Columbia 
Theater, is accounted by San Fran- 
cisco's most critical people to be 
one of the most delightful features 
of metropolitan life. The cuisine is 
famous, the incidental entertain- 
ment delightful. Every evening at 
8 o'clock there is a jolly, after-din- 
ner dance lasting until midnight. 
Two of the best exponents of the 
modern dance yet seen in this city, 
Mr. Le Boy and Alice Rinaldo, give 
nightly exhibitions of the new 
dances and instruction to the 
guests. During one of the dances 
each evening, called the "Lucky 
Dance," a valuable prize is given to 
one of the ladies participating. 

•X- ■>* # # 

Teehau Tavern has many appeals 
to popularity and now comes some- 
thing entirely new which will un- 
doubtedly attract even larger 
crowds to the Informal Dansants 
which take place every evening in 
the week. 

The innovation is the "Candy 
Dance" and its name is justified by 
the presentation to the ladies of 
artistic boxes of candy. 



Gold Pool Not Needed 
The Federal Reserve Board will 
very soon order the dissolution of 
the famous $100,000,000 gold pool 
which is no longer needed to pro- 
tect the foreign exchange situation. 
With demand sterling around $4.84 
and recently 300 points or more be- 
low the par of exchange it seems 
like a dream to remember how 
threatening was the outlook a short 
time ago. Foreign exchange rates 
tell of passing events with great 
accuracy, and the tale of the day 
is that the United States is the 
only country in the world which 
has all the money and credit it 
needs. 

Wall Street Whispers 
Those who imagine that the real 
J. P. Morgan & Co. died with the 
senior partner find an interesting 
contradiction in the recent appoint- 
ment of this firm as commercial 
agents of the British Government. 
As a matter of fact the firm has 
increasing prestige all through 
the strenuous times that have fol- 
lowed the declaration of Europe's 
war. 

Some Job 

A dispatch from Copenhagen, 
that Albert Ballin, director general 
of the Hamberg-American Steam- 
ship Company, at the request of 
Emporer William, has taken over 
the management of the entire rail- 
road system of Germany and the 
work of delivering food supplies 
for the German army. 



Among Those Present 

One of the "celebrities" at the big 
ball given last Saturday night at 
the new Civic Auditorium was Sam 
Berger, one of the proprietors of the 
Berger establishment on Market 
street. The "Celebrities Ball" it was 
called by the management, with 



such famous people as Charlie 
Chaplin and Mable Normand pres- 
ent. The affair proved to be a huge 
success from every standpoint. 

•K- -X- * # 

Oyster Loaf Buffet is Popular 
The Oyster Loaf Buffet on Market 
streets seems to be one of the popu- 
lar spots in town, around noon 
time particularly. The fine lunch- 
eon served draws to the cafe a large 
clientele. For the man who has but 
a few minutes to give to his noon 
meal, the Oyster Loaf Buffet will 
please greatly. Try it some day. 
* * * * 

A soldier writing from the 
trenches asks what is the meaning 
of the soldier's curious phrase for 
death, "Going West." Can any 
reader suggest an answer to this 
question? Is it soldier slang, or is 
it a phrase that has grown up dur- 
ing the present war? If a poetical 
explanation were permissible, the 
metaphor would be obvious. As the 
sun goes west so life travels to its 
end. Henley put the thought in 
some of his finest lines — 

Let me be gathered to the quiet 
west 

The sundown splendid and serene 
— Death. 

Dismissing that symbolic inter- 
pretation, one can only guess that 
the phrase comes from the colonies. 
One has to remember that in this 
war America, Australia and India 
are all making contributions of men 
and along with them contributions 
of slang. 

-X- -X- * * 

Everything points to a very large 
attendance at The Dansant to be 
given at the Palace Hotel this Sat- 
urday afternoon, between the hours 
of four and seven o'clock, for the 
purpose of raising funds for the 
Child Labor Convention and Ex- 
hibit in San Francisco. Mr. and Mrs. 
Douglas Crane, those favorite danc- 
ers, have signified their intention of 
dropping in for a while, and Mrs. 
Lee Rubens, who has the affair in 
charge is more than pleased at the 
support of San Francisco society 
folk. In addition to the long list of 
patronesses already announced are 
the following: The Mesdames Alex- 
ander Russell, Phillip King Brown, 
Philip Lansdale, Frederick Sharon, 
Horace Morgan, Carter Pomeroy, C. 
O. G. Miller, James Otis, Luther 
Holton, Clara Darling and the 
Misses Margaret Huntington, Mar- 
garet Williams, Frances Taylor and 
Ethel McAllister. Judge Frank J. 
Murasky of the Juvenile Court will 
also be in attendance. Reservation 
of tables may be made at the Pal- 
ace Hotel. 

Nightly dansants are drawing 
large crowds to Fred Solari's grill. 
The refined nature of the dancing 
and the quality of the music are 
combined inducements aside from 
the excellent cuisine. 






'•»*•«*♦**♦**«♦**+*»*•♦ 



Gray hair restored to its natural col- 
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perfectly harmless dye, and the effect 
is immediate. Tno most certain and 
satisfactory preparation for the pur- 
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The Mark of the Candy of Character 



"Small Blacks" I 



A COFFEE CONFECTION 
♦!• Halt As Sweet As Other Candy 



I 
y 
? 

More Than Twice As Good a 

10c, 50c and $1 PACKAGES | 

V 

The Golden Pheasant % 

32-36 GEARY STREET X 

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iMmaw 



HOTEL AND RESTAURANT 
64 - 56 Ellis Street 



Our Cooking Will Meet Tour Taste. Our 
Prices Will Please Yon. 



The New 

POODLE DOG 




HOTEL&RESTAURANT 

WILL REMAIN AT CORNER 

POLK and POST 

SAN FRANCISCO 

Telephones: Franklin 2960; Home C 6705 



Pearl Oyster House 

Phone Douglas 4788 

FISH AND SHELLFISH 

In All Its Varieties 

Fine-St. Entrance, California Market 






Phone China 571 



i ShanghaiLow f 

2 Chop Suey and Noodles f 

X Furnishes the Very Best Chop 2. 

A Suey and Oriental Dishes In the A 

.*, Finest Home like Dining' Boom in *> 

?• the City. £ 

y First Class Service, Special Booms *f 

y for Ladies y 

I 532 GRANT AVENUE 2 

X Between California and Fine Sts. X 



Saturday, February 6, 1915 

SPORTSMAN 

By R. 

Excitement Reigns 
The golf cluhs are buzzing with 
:alk ol the elaborate program arr- 
anged (or the Exposition games, 
mere is no doubt that players and 
II interested in their activities are 
igreeably surprised. They expected 
i lut, Imt not quite so much. 
Thi' verdict seems to be that this 
cill be the biggest and best tourna- 
nent ever held in America. It will 
end an impetus to the sport that 
vill drive it ahead tor years to conic. 

Ouimet, the Wonder 
Among the Eastern cracks who 
ire coming is Ouimet, that sensa- 
ion who declined to fall. This 
oung American is quite a unique 
personality in the history of the 
ame. When he heat the two great 
British players, it was freely pre- 
licted that the tlukc could not be 
epeated. Hut Ouimet has shown 
tamina and neither dazzling sue- 
ess or some severe set-backs, have 
ipoiled his game. He is the stuff 
>f which champions are made, and 
alifornians will be glad to greet 
lim. 

The Coast Contingent 
Travels, the wily old veteran, 
rlcreshoff, "Chic" Evans, will all 
3e here. What chance have Jack 
Seville, Harry Davis and "Scottie" 
Armstrong of Los Angeles against 
uch men? The answer is: "Quite 
i good chance." Playing on their 
>wn links and under the eyes of . 
;housands of well-wishers, the Coast 
ontingent are going to surprise the 
American golfing world. At least 
;hat is the view of men who have 
rown gray watching the develop- 
nent of the game around the bay. 

The Sequoiah Course 

The Sequoyah Club will provide 
i full-size championship course with 
i sandy soil and natural hazards, 
t will be possible to play on its 
arefully tended turf immediately 
ifter the heaviest rain, without get- 
ting one's feet wet. Those interested 
have no fear that all will be ready 
four the tournament in the spring. 
Messrs, John Lawson, Adamson, 
Lindsay and the other keen golfers, 
^vho have provided these beautiful 
links, deserve the grateful thanks 
:>f all interested in the royal and 
ancient game. 

* * * * 

Basketball to be Fad 
From golf to basketball is a far 
cry. Yet they are both good games. 
The visit of the Illinois Athletic 
Club team, champions of the world, 
has compelled immense interest. 
They come to defend their title 
to the Amateur Athletic Union. 
Championship, and the impression 
seems to be that they will success- 
fully do it. Basketball has been 
played longer in the East, there are 
more teams and the competition is 
keener. The Olympic Club unlimit- 
ed team, has been playing 



THE WASP 



'S NOTEBOOK 

C. Baily 

for a number of years, and has 
evolved a bewildering system ol 
team-plays. No local team can deft 
this scoring machine, and there are 
those who think the men from Chi- 
cago will be trounced. Experts 
claim that the game as played in 
the East and Middle-west is much 
rougher than here, if this is the 
case, the referee is going to have 
an awkward task. The Illinois team 
arrive from the East February 21, 

and leave .March 1. They will play 

al number of practice games apart 

from their A. A. L'. engagements. 

* * * * 

" I Keep Rabbits" 

E. B. de Groot, the new head of 

Kan Francisco's playground activi- 



letlCS Should bo made really useful 

to hoys, girls and parents. 

Even devised systems tor stimu- 
lating an interest in such hum 
drum activities a- carrying coal for 
mother, or helping wash up. The 
hoy at the English college who ask- 
i .1 u hat branch of athletics he was 

good at. replied: "I keep rabbits," 
may have rivals in this city yet. 



The Dizzy Motion Revived 

Roller-skating, always a favorite 
sport with (alifornians, owing to 
tlie absence of ice, is being revived 
again at Dreamland Kink. Some of 
the most graceful skaters in the 
world arc to he found in the ranks 
of San Francisco Society. The Misses 
Zeile, .Miss Cheesbrough, and many 
others can move on wheels with the 
easy grace that few of the icy maid- 
ens can equal. In a New York Club 




"^J-lw 



The Speedy Basketball Team of the Olympic Club 



ties, has established a national rep- 
utation in the very modern sphere 
of work. He has grown gray in the 
task of teaching people how to play. 
There are those who claim that too 
much time and energy is wasted in 
these days in over play. Strange to 
relate, Mr. de Groot, who has spent 
fifteen years teaching Chicago how- 
to spend the leisure hours, is in 
entire agreement with them. It is 
part of his work to prevent over- 
lapping, and the futile expenditure 
of time. He thinks games and ath- 



thc other day, much amusement 
was aroused by the claim that Cali- 
fornian's were excellent skaters. But 
the tittering ceased when it was ex- 
plained that the surface was maple- 
wood, not ice, and on wheels in- 
stead of steel runners. 



The death of James E. Sullivan 
has placed the Amateur Athletic 
l'nion on trial. The man, who has 
just gone, governed the great or- 
ganization of which he was the 



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13 

head, more or less as a Czar. That 
his rule was beneficent, tin- larger 
number of those interested in ama- 
teurism will admit readily. Hut he 
was undoubtedly an autocrat. He 
was the beau ideal of the committee 
of one. Now that he is gone, many 
interests and men, who were rest- 
less hid afraid under his sway, arc 
beginning to grow bolder. A spirit 
of revolt against the strict ruling of 
the l'nion has displayed itself at 
such widely distant points as Den 
ver. I. ii- Angeles and New York. In 
these preliminary affrays the Union 
has triumphed, but there will be 
bigger battles. In a commercial age, 
the way of simon pure amateurism 
is hard. For instance there is golf! 
* * * * 

Polo Situation 

From the point of view of the 
duck, or water polo player, the pres- 
ent weather may be admirable. But 
no language is sufficiently pictur- 
esque or warm to express the view 
of the man who plays his game on 
a pony. 

For seven long weeks the players 
down the Peninsula have waited 
disconsolate for a chance to have a 
game. Each day the rain has pat- 
tered on the window panes and 
the ponies are eating their heads 
off and stamping and fretting in 
the stables. If the sky does not 
clear soon the local teams will enter 
the arena minus practice or train- 
ing. Manager Harry Hastings 
thinks that several of the "big 
four" will be playing in the Expo- 
sition games, but not as a team. He 
expects they will be present as mem- 
bers of other fours. The Coopers- 
town men are already assiduously 
practicing at Coronado, and they 
are not being handicapped by the 
rain to the same extent as their 
friends in the North. 



The preliminary practice and 
games will be played down the Pen- 
insula and it is not anticipated 
that the finals, which are to take 
place at the Exposition ground will 
be reached until March. 



Major Ross, for some time manag- 
er of the Coronado Country Club, is 
among those who will be absent 
from this season's games. He is a 
great full-back, with an unerring 
back-hand shot, and his faculty for 
playing an uphill game made him 
worth much more to a side, than 
the number of goals against his 
name in the official handicap lists 
would indicate. The Major is an 
officer in the Canadian forces. As 
the situation in Europe grew more 
serious, he realized that he would 
have to go. His cheery personality 
will be much missed. He was very 
popular with the cosmopolitan 
crowd that gathers at Coronado. 
At times, in the heat of the game 
the Canadian soldier was apt to 
lapse into warm words. This never 
failed to delight the many "jackies" 
from Uncle Sam's fleet, who invar- 
iably attend the more interesting 
contests in the South. 



14 



THE WASP 



Saturday, February 6, 191 



THE MONEY MARKET 



MONEY continues in an abund- 
ant supply and rates are easy 
while the outlook is tor con- 
tinuance of these conditions. Call 
money remains at 2 per cent, or 
under in New York, while the local 
rate is 3 1-2 and 4 per cent for 
brokers' customers and tor outside 
call loans. Individual customers' 
collateral loans and commercial 
loans are quoted from 4 to 6 
per cent, commercial paper from 
3 3-4 to 4 1-2 per cent and year mon- 
ey is quoted from 4 3-4 to 5 per 
cent. In New York 60-day loans are 
quoted at 3 per cent, four to six 
months' money 3 1-2 per cent, com- 
mercial paper from 3 1-2 to 4 per 
cent and year money is quoted 5 1-2 
per cent there. The money is in a 
trifle better request due to the ac- 
tivity of the stock market. Interior 
rates are also easy, although a trifle 
higher than those quoted here. The 
movement of commercial paper is of 
fair volume and offerings are some- 
what restricted owing to the slack- 
ened pace of trade and industry. 
The building of an immense trade 
balance in our favor is a factor 
which will operate favorably in the 
future. The benefit accruing from 
our large exports is not general, yet 
it has a bearing on our monetary 
situation. The large foreign credits 
placed in the United States are for 
munitions of war generally and go 
to strengthen our position in the 
world's money mart; in fact, we are 
the only credit country in the world 
at present. 

A slight firmness in foreign ex- 
change is the response to the an- 
nouncement last week that arrange- 
ments had been perfected by a 
group of international bankers 
whereby any undue movements of 
gold between this country and Eu- 
rope would be prevented. Coupled 
with this information was the state- 
ment that the British Government 
had established a commercial agen- 
cy in this country. Inasmuch as the 
foreign exchange market is point- 
ing inevitably to a movement of 
gold into this country the inference 
is that a large credit will be open- 
ed here for London which will be 
utilized for the purchase of supplies, 
etc. Such a credit would he the 




SoriE ftRE BORN TO GREftTNESS: SOME --ETC. 

THE MONEY MAKERS 

(By X-WALL) 



only means for counteracting the 
decline in exchange that must en- 
sue as a result of the favorable 
trend in our foreign trade. Already 
the balance has swung around very 
decisively in our favor; and the new 
era has only just commenced. 

It will naturally have to be a very 
considerable credit to be of any ma- 
terial benefit. Its practical effect 
will be to hold a corresponding 
amount of exchange off the market 
as the bankers making the advance 
will probably be instructed to pay 
for supplies, etc., purchased on this 
side, or honor drafts drawn against 
goods shipped to Europe. It is 
said the credit may be $100,000,000, 
but it may amount to more in the 
end, at the rate the trade balance is 
now piling up in our favor. But 
it must be apparent that such an 
expedient can only be temporary. 
There will come a time when Europe 
will have to settle this adverse bal- 
ance. She can do so in two ways, 
namely: by sending back our se- 
curities or by shipping gold. Grant- 
ed that no greater cause arises for 
sending back our securities than 
there is at present the prospects 
are very decidedly in favor of an ex- 
tensive gold movement. 

The credit arrangement is analo- 
gous to the steps contemplated to 
prevent a heavy drain of gold from 
here to Europe last fall, except in 
that case it was an expedient that 
was only needed temporarily, as it 
was well recognized that the trade 



THE ANGLO & LONDON PARIS 
NATIONAL BANK 



SAN FRANCISCO 




Capital $ 4,000,000 

Surplus and Profits. 1,600,000 
Total Resources.... 40,000,000 

OFFICEES: 

Herbert Fleischhacker President 

Sig. Greenebaum. .Chairman of Board 
Washington Dodge. . . Vice-President 

J. Priedlander Vice-President 

C. F. Hunt Vice-President 

S. Altschul Cashier 

C. E. Parker Assistant Cashier 

Wm. H. High Assistant Cashier 

H. Choynski Assistant Cashier 

G. R. Eitrdick Assistant Cashier 

G. P. Herr. .. .Assistant. Cashier 
A. L. Langerman Secretary 



balance would soon turn in our fa- 
vor. In our case, as things turned 
out, there was no need to ship more 
than a nominal amount of gold. 
But now the expedient is only a 
means of putting off the "evil day" 
and the question is when the gold 
inflow will start. In so far as it will 
relieve the Bank of England's gold 
supply for some time during the 
present crisis a credit arrangement 
of this sort will prove beneficial. 

* * * * 

Getting in Shape 

The principal financial news of 
the week related to the ascendent 
position which this country is at- 
taining as a world market for mon- 
ey and commodities. Our export 
balance was not only the largest ev- 
er reported for the month, but its 
total of $132,000,000 has been exceed- 
ed only two or three times by the 
balance of any month. February 
promises to make an entirely new 
record in this direction. The British 
Treasury announcement that Brit- 
ish capital would not be available 
during the war for borrowers out- 
side the empire was simply adver- 
tisement of the fact that our money 
market was getting into shape to 
finance the international trade. 

Our international position estab- 
lishes a firm basis for trade, indus- 
trial and financial recovery this 
year. Already signs of coming im- 
provement are noticeable in general 
business and a significant change 
is noted in banking attitudes to- 
ward the reorganization of corpo- 
rate crippled corporations, particu- 
larly railroad compainies. In un- 
dertaking the task of readjusting 
the affairs of the Missouri Pacific 
Railroad important banking inter- 
ests have given most encouraging 
evidence of their opinion that the 
times are propitious for clearing the 
way to a countrywide resumption 
of prosperous activity. Indeed there 
is an implication in the case of the 
Missouri Pacific, the Wabash and 
other properties that reorganiza- 
tion work had best begin speedily 
before reviving prosperity readers 
securing holders less willing to pay 
the heavy price necessary to make 
financial readjustment as thorough- 
going as they should be. 



High 

Grade 

Municipals 

Free from the expense and annoy- 
ance of the Federal 

Income Tax 

Byrne & 
McDonnell 



NEW YORK, NEWARK, 
SAN FRANCISCO 



Merchants Exhange Bldg. 
San Francisco, California 



The German Savings 
and Loan Society 

(THE GERMAN BANK) 
Savings Commercial 

Incorporated 1868 
526 California Street San Francisco 

Cal. 

Member of the Associated Savings 

Banks of San Francisco. 

The following Branches for Receipt 
and Payment of Deposits only : 
Mission Branch, S. E. corner Mission 

and 21st Streets. 
Richmond District Branch, S. W. cor- 
ner Clement and 7th Ave. 
Haight Street Branch, S. W. corner 
Haight and Belvedere. 

DECEMBER 31st, 1914 

Assets $58,584,596.93 

Deposits 55,676,513.19 

Reserve and Contingent 

Funds 1,908,083.74 

Employees' Pension 

Fund 188,521.05 

Number Depositors 66,442 

Office hours: 10 o'clock A. M. to 
3 o'clock P. M., except Saturdays to 
12 o'clock M. and Saturday evenings 
from 6 o'clock P. M. to 8 o'clock P. 
M. for receipt of deposits only. 

For the 6 months ending Decem- 
ber 31st, 1914, a dividend to de- 
positors of 4 per cent per annum 
was declared. 




Wells Fargo Nevada 
National Bank 

Of San Francisco 

Nevada Bank Building, 2 Montgomery St., 
N. E. Corner of Market St. 

Capital Paid Up $6,000,000.00 

Surplus & Undivided Profits 5,148,628.93 



Total 511,148,628.93 

OFFICERS. 

Isaias W. Hellman, President 
I. W. Hellman, Jr., Vice-Pras. 
F L. Lipman, Vice-Pres 
James K Wilson, Vice-Pres. 
Frank B. King, Cashier. 
C. L. Jacobs, Assistant Cashier 
W. McGavin, Assistant Cashier 
C. L, Davis, Assistant Cashier 
A. D. Oliver, Assistant Cashier 
A. B. Price, Assistant OaBhier 
DIRECTORS. 
Isaias W. Hellman I. W. Hellman, Jr. 
Joseph Sloss A. Christeson 

Percy T Morgan Wm. Haas 

F. W. Van Sicklen Hartland Law 
Wm F. Herrin Henry Rosenfeld 

John C. Kirkpatrick James L. Flood 
J. Henry Meyer Chas. J. Deering 

A. H Pnyson James K Wilson 

F L. Lipman 

ACCOUNTS INVITED 

Prompt Service, Courteous Attention, Un- 
excelled Facilities. 
SAFE DEPOSIT VAULTS 



Saturday, February 6, 1915 

TUMULTY'S HAT 
First let it be understood that 
Mr. Joseph P. Tumulty's tale of woo 
iocs not rest upon the fact that the 
lergyman who cocked his hat was 
i Methodist. The liat would have 
leen cocked in the same way had 
he clergyman sitting down on it 
ieen <>f any other denomination. It 
9 due Mr. Tumulty to say that he 
nukes iki attempt to discriminate. 
I'hc fact that the clergyman who 
<at down on Mr. Tumulty's hat at 
Indianapolis was a Methodist cler- 
gyman adds nothing either to veri- 
similitude of arisemblance, but is 
u wearisome detail of the story. 

The story is that while Mr. Tu- 
multy, who is the private secretary 
nf President Wilson, was in Indian- 
apolis with his chief, a Methodist 
[■lergyman sat down upon his hat; 
that, because of the cocked appear- 
ance of the hat thereafter, the door- 
keeper refused him admittance to 
the hall where Mr. Wilson was 
speaking, and that ill luck has 
since attended him, at a New York 
hotel where he stopped en route 
back to Washington, on a domestic 
visit he made to New Jersey to 
which political motives have since 
been imputed, and in having, since 
that unlucky day, indorsed for a 
Federal office a man now charged 
with being connected with a trust. 
A word to Mr. Tumulty; he 
should have got rid of the cocked 
hat at once. It was keeping it 
which is now working the hoodoo 
in his case. Such a believer in luck 
as Mr. Wilson could tell him that. 
Nobody doubts that if Mr. Wilson 
could have made a cocked hat of 
Mr. Bryan when he was trying to 
get somebody to sit down on him, 
he would not now have him in his 
cabinet. 

The Pursuit 

San Francisco Society is watching 
witli interest and some amusement 
Marian Newhall's attempts at the 
conquest of Daniel Jackling, the 
copper king, who went to San Fran- 
cisco from Salt Lake City with the 
frankly expressed intention of "do- 
ing society." The dashing Miss New- 
hall and several young matrons are 
helping Jackling do it, and he has 
lately joined a small and exclusive 
dancing club. Whether Marian 
wants the copper magnate to add 
to the many strings to her bow or 
as a more important factor in her 
life she has not confided to any- 
one.— Town Topics., N. Y. 
# * * # 

Reggie and the Actress 

There is much gossip along 
Broadway and some speculation 
about the obvious intimacy between 
Charley Dillingham and Reggie 
Vanderbilt. It is not known that 
there are any business relations be- 
tween them— Charley surely needs 
no financial backing these days — 
and people are wondering just why 
Reggie is sticking around the the- 
atre so much. Perhaps time will 
tell. 



THE WASP 



15 




THINGS 
WE 
SHOULDN'T 
KNOW 



or 



This Is Too Subtle 
A certain San Francisco society 

matron who has rather more than 
a penchant for "lions," big game 
being necessary to assure her social 
position, which has been rather pre- 
carious for sometime, made an in- 
formal call on the Countess V. de 
Mouillac, who arrived here this 
week from Paris and is lingering for 
a few days before joining her hus- 
band, a naval officer at Tahiti. The 
lady kindly and diplomatically ex- 
pressed her horror and regret at the 
ravages endured by la belle France, 
and then suggested that the Coun- 
tess accept her hospitality, with the 
further promise that she would in- 
troduce her to San Francisco society. 
The French circle, while charming 
in itself, did not represent the real 
four hundred. It would be a joy- 
anee la Countess could never forget. 
With the finished mind of her race, 
the Countess instantly understood 
the situation. While she served re- 
freshments she declined in this 
manner: 

"More and more I begin to under- 
stand, madame, that your San Fran- 
cisco is a great Exposition city." 



An Innovation 
She who would possess an origi- 
nal mind must get up before 
breakfast, or stay up all night, as 
many do. To keep ahead of the 
times introduce innovations. An in- 
novation is anything outside of the 
eternal triangle which will compel 
press space. Mrs. Frederick Burn- 
ham, who has hunted big game, and 
the Countess Dubois-Lucy, who 
married into Iowa's World's Fair 
Commission, have introduced dan- 
sants as a special feature in the ob- 
servation car of an overland. It 
was a happy idea and will no 
doubt prove popular. Indeed, it is 
strange no one thought of it before. 
The coach of a running train has 
the proper vibration for a modern 
dance, the slewy and dizzy charact- 
er of the modern dance music. Par- 
ticularly is it adapted to rag. And 
rag cannot die with so many peo- 
ple too lazy to really learn to dance. 
Besides a rag is expressive of so 
many minds. A debutante of the 
season praises it with "It's so nat- 
ural." In truth it is natural to 
very many. The upa-upa is natur- 
al to the Tahitian, too. But the 
trip to California across country 
has been raisined. The one-time 
dull train journey has become a 
low-necked social event. 



As Others See us 
A pampered pet of San Francisco 
society is Ysabel Chase, who has 
been giving a very good exhibition 
of running Gussie Foute a close race 
for popularity as far as fairy god- 
mothers go. Mrs. William H. 
Crocker has been of great help to 
Gussie, and Mrs. Frederick Sharon 
has in recent years vied with Mrs. 
Crocker in featuring Gussie at ev- 
erything she gave until it became 
current gossip that she was trying 
to make a match between her young 
protoge and her very eligible bro- 
ther, Dr. Harry Tevis. Since the 
Foutes went abroad the Horace 
Blanchard Chases have come a fin- 
ancial cropper and have had to part 
with Stags Leap, their far-famed 
home in the Napa Valley, and move 
into very unpretentious quarters al- 
so in the country, but this time 
down the Peninsula among Ysabel's 
friends. Ysabel is now on her way 
to Honolulu as the guest of Mr. 
and Mrs. Christian dc Guine, Jr., 
(Marie Louise Elkins) for a stay of 
six weeks or more in the Islands. 
On the same steamer with them are 
the Harold Dillinghams (Margaret 
Hyde-Smith), who have been enter- 
tained from A to Z by all their 
friends during Margaret's visit 
home, and, of course, they will intro- 
duce the de Guignes and Ysabel in 
exclusive Honolulu society, and see 
that they have the time of their 
lives while there. Mrs. Foute and 
Augusta are now in San Francisco 
after their interrupted European 
tour. — Town Topics, N. Y. 



mm 



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16 



THE WASP 



Saturday, February G, 1915 




ORPHEUM 

The W. Horelik Ensemble, which 
numbers fourteen people and in- 
cludes some of the most remarkable 
exponents of Russian folk dances 
that have ever appeared in this 
country will head the Orpheum bill 
next week in their pantomimic sen- 
sation "In the Gypsy Camp," which 
is a story told without words of 
jealousy, hatred, love and beauty. 
It finishes with a sort of terpsichor- 
ean carnival during which is given 
an exhibition of cyclonic dancing 
that proved one of the greatest 
sensations New York has ever 
known. > -I 

Charley Grapewin, the favorite 
comedian, will appear in the domes- 
tic comedy "Poughkeepsie" which is 
one continuous laugh. He will be 
supported by Anna Chance, who is 
not only fair to look upon, but an 
excellent foil for Mr. Grapewin's hu- 
morous acting. 

Butler Haviland and Alice 
Thornton will present the plotless, 
sobless comedy trifle, "At Trou- 
ville," which is based upon the un- 
fortunate incident of a young man, 
who, while in bathing, has a por- 
tion of his attire taken from his 
bath wagon, and the effort he un- 
successfully makes to reach his ho- 
tel unobserved. 

Santley and Norton, a pair of en- 
tertaining vocalists, furnish a thor- 
oughly enjoyable act. 

Next week will terminate the en- 
gagements of Paul Armstrong's one 
act satire, "Woman Proposes:" Mr. 
and Mrs. Douglas Crane and Milt 
Collins. It will also be the last of 
the famous Metropolitan Opera 
House Prima Donna Mme. Jeanne 
.Tomelli, who has scored a most bril- 
liant triumph. 

* * * * 

CORT 

"Peg o' My Heart" has been more 
than repeating its triumph of last 
year at the Cort Theatre, for the at- 
tendance on the return engagement 
has been even greater than it was 
before. The Manner's comedy and 
Peggy O'Neil, the winsome little ac- 
tress who plays Peg, are firmly es- 
tablished as genuine San Francisco 
favorites. The second, and what 
must be the final week of the en- 
gagement, begins with tonight's per- 
formance. It has been arranged, 
however, to add one more night to 
the original engagement, that of 
Sunday, February 14th. 

Peggy O'Neil's delightful inter- 
pretation of the central role is well 
known. She brings to the part just 
the Celtic piquancy that it de- 
mands,, for Miss O'Neil is both Cel- 



tic and piquant. She radiates 
charm the moment she appears up- 
on the stage. The humorous lines 
of the playright trip from her lips 
with certain rare spontaneous qual- 
ity that is indescribable. 

The plot of "Peg 'o My Heart" is 
too well known to require retelling. 
Everyone knows the story of the lit- 
tle Irish-American girl who is sud- 
denly transplanted to an aristo- 
cratic home in England and who 
resents the transplanting. Partic- 
ularly she resents the process of 
their "making a lady of her." But, 
of course, she does become quite a 
lady and everything ends hapily as 
it should in all good plays. 

In addition to Miss O'Neil, Oli- 
ver Morosco has sent the New York- 
Chicago cast, an admirable organi- 



zation in its entirety. There will be 
a popular priced matinee on Wed- 
nesday in addition to the regular 
matinee Saturday. 

"The Whirl of the World," the 
great winter garden spectacle show, 
headed by Eugene and Willie How- 
ard, will be seen at the Cort begin- 
ning, Monday, February 15. 

The Biggest Ever 

The biggest program and the low- 
est schedule of prices ever asked for 
any concert will be the feature of 
the San Francisco Symphony Or- 
chestra's special Sunday concert at 
the Exposition Civic Auditorium 
next Sunday afternoon at 2:30 
o'clock. Augmented to eighty musi- 
cians, the orchestra will have as so- 
loists: Albert Spalding, the leading 
American violinist and Rudolph 
Ganz, the great Swiss pianist. Con- 
ductor Hadley's program includes: 
Wagner's Overture "The Master- 
singers," Beethoven's piano concer- 
to "The Emperor," Goldmark's Sym- 
phony "The Rustic Wedding," Men- 
delsohn's concerto for the violin 
and Tschaikowsky's overture "The 
Year 1S12." 

There will be 1550 reserved seats 
on the main floor and 708 in the bal- 
cony at 50c each, 1412 seats not re- 






f 















ALBERT SPALDING 

ALMA GLUCK 

THE SUBLIME SOPRANO 

Columbia Theater 

Tickets $2.50. $2.00, $1.50, $1.00 at Sher- 
man Clay & Co., Kohler and Chase and 
Columbia Theatre. 

Coining- Peb. 28, The Violinist 
ZIMBALIST 



In March — MAGGIE TEYTE 



CQi£ 



LEADING 

THEATRE 



EU1» and Market 
Phone Sutter 2460 



2nd and Last Week Starts Sunday Nig-lit 
Last Performance Sunday Night, Peb. 14 ■ 

Oliver Morosco Presents 

THE IRBESISTIBLE COMEDY OP I 
YOUTH 

"Peg 'o My Heart" I 

By J. Hartley Manners 
With Peg-g-y O'Neil 

...And the New York-Chicago Cast..^. 
Nig-hts and Sat. Mat. Prices 50c to $2.00 

Popular $1.00 Matinee Wednesday 



Next — Beg-inning- Monday, Peb. 15 — 
"The Whirl of the World." 



0"FMim\\. mxSTOCWOH fcr fOV'J'E.U. 

Safest and Most Magnificent Theatre In 
America. 



Week Beginning* this Sunday afternoon 
(Matinee Every Day.' 



Peggy O'Neil with "Peg o' My Heart" at the Cort 



VAUDEVILLE AT ITS GP.EATEST 

W. HORLIK ENSEMBLE in their 
Dancing Sensation '"In the Gypsy Camp": 
CHARLEY GRAPEWIN supported by 
Anna Chance in "Poughkeepsie;" BUT- 
LER HAVILAND & ALICE THORNTON 
presenting- "At Trouville;" SANTLT & 
NORRTON Singers; Paul Armstrong's 
one act satire "WOMAN PROPOSES" 
with Ruth Allen and a company of 8; 
MR. & MRS. DOUGLAS CRANE in their 
dances; MILT COLLINS. Last Week — 
Great Artistic Triumph MME. JEANNE 
JOMELLI, Prima Donna of the Metro- 
politan Opera Company. 

Evening Prices 10c, 25c, 50c, 75c. 

Matinee Prices (except Sundays and 

Holidays) 10c, 25c, 50c. 

PHONE DOUGLAS 70 



.Saturday, February (',, 1(11.1 



THE WASP 



17 



served mi the main door and 2705 in 
the balcony not reserved at 25c 
each. There are 250 boxes mi the 
main Mum- ami balcony. The price 
of a box seating eight is $5.00, single 
lm\ -eat- are sl.00 each. 



Remarkable Motion Picture 

"The German side of tin' War" is 
the title of a remarkable motion 
picture which will be presented for 

one week only at the Savoy Theatre. 
beginning this Sunday. Five reels 
of film which is direct from Ger- 
many ami hears the sanction of the 
Kaiser, show the German phases of 
the present conflict exclusively. The 
Kaiser appears in many of the 
scenes and is shown reviewing his 
troops at the mobilization and 
again addressing his people from 
the royal palace in Berlin. Only 
the battlefields where the Germans 
have been victorious arc included 
and it is pointed out by the spon- 
sor's of the pictures that they show 
conclusively that the Emperor's 
troops arc well fed and invariably 
cheerful, while their prisoners are 
well treated, well nourished and 
generally cared for. A feature of the 
affects in the regiment photographs 
is the famous German "Goose step" 
of the soldiers on the march. 
Scenes in Vienna, with the Emper- 
or Franz Joseph greatly in evidence, 
are also included. The perform- 
ance will be continuous on Sun- 
day, from 11 a. m. to 11 p. m. and 
on week days the pictures will be 
shown at 8:30, 7:30 and 9 p. m. 



It Will Soon Be Here 

Never has a Mardi Gras Ball so 
piqued the curiosity of the smart 
set as the one which is to be staged 
in the sun court of the Palace Ho- 
tel on the night of February 16th. 
The committee of the arrangements 
has not enveloped the proceedings 
in an impenetrable fog of uncertain- 
ty. In fact they have given out the 
news just as fast as the details 
could be decided upon. 

Now that the queen, the king, the 
ladies-in-waiting, and the courtiers 
have been announced: with the set- 
ting of the French Garden deter- 
mined upon for the background; 
with the announcement that the ar- 
tists and sculptors connected with 
the exposition will be a feature of 
the pageant and will introduce 
some novel touches in the pano- 
rama of gay masquers, one would 
think that the edge of curiosity 
would be dulled and that the smart 
set would simply sit back and wait 
for the night of nights. 

But to the contrary these gener- 
alities have in no wise taken the 
edge of the interest and everywhere 
that the gay parties foregather one 
hears a hundred speculations. 



St. Valentino's Eva The goal has 

i n set .'ii $50, expected to be 

raised. 

The big campaign contemplated 
i- not to be in the form of a tag- 
or a pencil day. or anything of 
that sort. It is to be a house i" 
house canvass, with every last por- 
tion of the City systematically comb- 
ed by volunteer workers for the 
single dollar donations, of which it 
hopes to get $50,000. 

The Associated Charities is in dire 
need of funds. The past year has 
been a hard one. Each day has 
seen an increase in the number of 
appeals for aid which have been re- 
served— and met. The result is the 
organization is hard pressed for 
money with which to continue its 
work. 

The best people in San Francisco 
have rallied to the aid of the or- 
ganization in this campaign. The 
list of workers includes some of the 
best known names in the city's life. 
Society women will go forth on the 
Big Day to ring doorbells and ask 
for "Dollar Valentines for the 
Poor." 

In return for each dollar dona- 
tion, the volunteer solicitors will 



give valentine receipts, a bit of pa- 
per suitably engraved with room 
upon for the inscription of the con 

I ributor'S name. The committee in 
charge of the work issues the warn- 
ing that no money should he given 
unless a valentine receipt is given 
in return for each dollar. 



First Hand News 

Frances Starr is playing in "Marie- 
Odele" at the Belasco, New York. 

.Mrs. Stuyvcsant Fish, of New 
York, decries the "hard-up" hys- 
teria. "Those with means should 
give as much employment as they 
can. instead of economizing," the 
Gotham leader of society advises. 

Booth Tarkington's "Pcnrod," 
published last March, is in its six- 
tieth thousand, and is said to have 
sold better during the last few 
months than ever before. 



The editorial and business offices 
of The Wasp have been moved to 
The Bankers Investment Building, 
49 Geary Street. The telephone num- 
ber has been changed to Douglas 
1871. 



An Appeal 

"A Dollar Valentine for the Poor" 
is the alluring slogan adopted by 
the Associated Charities for the 
"Dollar Day" campaign which it is 
to wage on Saturday, February 13, 




Committee of Mercy 
The Committee of Mercy a lovely 
title with Lady Paget as president, 

Mrs. John Astor as vie- president, 
the Duchess of Marlborough as 
chairman and Lady Randolph 
Churchill as head of the Hospital 
Committee all American women — 
is connected witl) the American 
Women's War Relief Fund, with of- 
fice- at No. 200 Fifth avenue, ami 
asks [or immediate contributions. 
Frederick 11. Allen, the honorary 
treasurer, writes: "The suffering in 
Europe is beyond conception, and 
women and children are dying daily 
as the result of hunger and expos- 
ure." 



Savoy Theatre 

One Week, Com. Feb. 7 — Sunday. Con- 
tinuous from 11 a. m. to 11 p. m. Week 
days at 2:30, 7:30 and 9 p. m. 

FIRST TIME IN CALIFORNIA! 

5 REELS Or AUTHENTIC PICTURES 

"THE GERMAN SIDE OF 
THE WAR" 

Direct from Germany and sanctioned by 
the Kaiser. Interesting- Explanatory 
Lecture. 

Prices — 20c and 30c. 



SPECIAL SUNDAY CONCERT 

SYMPHONY 

ORCHESTRA 

Hehry Hadley Conductor. 

February 7th, 2:30 P. M. 

Doors Open at 1:30 P. II. 
AT THE EXPOSITION CIVIC 

AUDITORIUM 

POLK AND GEOVI STREETS 

80 — Musicians — 80 

TWO GREAT SOLOISTS 

Albert Spalding, Violinist, 

Rudolf Ganz. Pianist. 

NOTE SPECIAL PRICES 
Reserved Seats 50c: General Admission 
25c; Box Seats $1.00 each; Full Boxes, 
seating 8, $5.00. 

Seat sale: Tickets NOW at box office 
Sherman. Clay & Co., and at Auditorium 
day of concert. Mail orders NOW to 
Frank W. Healy, 711-712 Head Building. 
San Francisco. 



RENT YOUR 

Dress Suit 



From 



CHARLEY GRAPEWIN and ANNA CHANCE at Orpheum 




Selix 



50-54 
Mason Street 

Phone Douglas 1133 



IS 



THE WASP 



Saturday, February 6, 1915 



NEW/PAP 
SHOP 




FRA ELBERT FAKE 

The American public has some 
tunny idols. Elbert Hubbard is 
one of the tunniest. Elbert has al- 
ways been so patently out tor the 
dollar that it is rather strange he 
should ever have become an idol, 
any more than John Smith or any 
other maker of Furniture. The rea- 
son for his acceptance, perhaps, is 
his capacity for "putting something 
over." However fraudulent the 'op- 
eration, the American public usu- 
ally worship this quality in a man. 
Let him get by with it and he is 
lauded regardless of anything but 
what he makes. All his life Fra 
Elbert has been "putting over" oth- 
er men's sayings, has been trading 
advertising in the shape of scrap- 
heap philosophy, and passing for 
clever on a blathery arrangement of 
words. In line with all this he has 
become a newspaper callboy. Like 
Alfred Henry Lewis he will die in 
the service. Meanwhile he keeps on 
losing his hair and selling furni- 
ture. A liar or a thief, it does not 
matter, a man is successful who gets 
the money. 



Chester Criticizes 

George Randolph Chester is quick 
to adapt himself. But he has a 
poor opinion of the San Francisco 
newspaper man. He let this out in 
a conversation the other night with 
very intimate friends. "It seems so 
silly," he said. "You may be here 
but twenty-four hours, or you may 
have been here a hundred times be- 
fore, yet the question of every re- 
porter is 'How do you like San 
Francisco? You are quite in love 
with it, are you not?' Imagine a re- 
porter on The Sun, The Tribune, or 
The World, putting out the 'How 
do you like New York' line. If San 
Francisco were a village I could un- 
derstand it. Do your city editors 
demand this sort of copy — the pa- 
pers seem to be full of it to the dis- 
advantage of other reading matter. 
It is rather a blot on local intelli- 
gence. San Francisco is all right 
and always has been, but why keep 
printing it? People will eventually 
think that there is something the 
matter with you." 



table and asked Harry, the waiter, 
"May we have a little spoon?" "Why 
yes sir," replied the waiter urbanely, 
"there won't be anybody around for 
a while; spoon as much as you 
like!" 



A Little Spoon 
Do not talk about the return of 
prosperity with two of the leading 
daily papers of New York— the best 
in the world — offering a silver-plat- 
ed spoon with every copy, like a 
backwoods weekly, in order to keep 
up the circulation of their Sunday 
edition. This reminds one of a New- 
lywed who took his wife into John's 
between the rushes of the lunch 
and dinner hours, and, when his or- 
der was served, glanced over the 



Gary's Prophecy 

E. H. Gary, chairman of the Unit- 
ed States Steel Corporation predicts 
that the pecuniary advantages to 
this country resulting from the war 
are now equal to the disadvantages, 
so far as he could judge. 

"The business men of this coun- 
try are at the present time on a bet- 
ter basis than ever before," he con- 
tinued. "Their management, their 
conduct, their business morals are 
improved; their standards are high- 
er. 

"We have before us promise of an 
era of prosperity, contentment and 
happiness. Undoubtedly the ter- 
rible consequences of the pending 
war will for some time unfavorably 
affect even this great and growing 
nation, but if we remain strictly 
neutral we may expect to receive an 
increasing measure of trade and in- 
fluence. 

"The extreme optimist of today, if 
the people of this country take ad- 
vantage of their opportunities, will, 
ten years hence, be considered to 
have been very conservative in his 
estimate of future prosperity. The 
year 1915 seems certain to be much 
better for the business man than 
1914 was, and we should do every- 
thing practicable to evidence our 
faith in future prosperity." 

* * * -x- 
Lower Discount Rates 

"It is expected that as a result of 
the lower discount rates authorized 
for Atlanta, Chicago and San Fran- 
cisco reserve banks, discount oper- 
ations, particularly in the South- 
ern district, will assume somewhat 
larger proportions. 

"The Aldrich-Vreeland act as 
amended expires by limitation on 
June 30 next, by which date all 
currency issued under the provis- 
ions of that act must be retired. 
There is still about $50,000,000 of this 
additional currency outstanding in 
the Southern districts, and the 
board deemed it wise to approve 
the lower discount rates so as to 
enable the banks of that section by 
availing .themselves of the [redis- 
count privileges to retire their ad- 
ditional currency without inconven- 
ience to conditions. 

"There is now an adundance of 
money in many of the Federal Re- 
serve districts, and it seems an in- 
opportune time for most of the Fed- 
eral Reserve Banks to try to force 
their funds into use through dis- 
count operations in their own dis- 
tricts. Under the Federal reserve 
system it is possible by means of 
rediscount operations between Fed- 
eral reserve Banks for reserve mon- 
ey to flow from districts where it 
cannot be employed into those 
where it can be used to advantage." 



German Ladies' Society 
The German Ladies' Benevolent 
Society, founded in San Francisco 
in 1870, and for forty-five consecutive 
years in its quiet, noble, efficient 
way, a fine factor of San Francisco's 
charity work, held its big, annual 
meeting and election of officers on 
Wednesday, January 27th. 

The election of officers resulted 
as follows: President, Mrs. Caroline 
Koester; First Vice President, Mrs. 
M. Esberg; Second Vice President, 
Mrs. M. A. Fehleisen; Treasurer, Mrs. 
M. A. Rohlffs; Financial Secretary, 
Mrs. Henry Meyer; Recording Sec- 
retary, Mrs. John H. Gingg. Board 
of Directors: Mrs. Geo. L. Volk- 
mann, Mrs. F. Habenicht, Mrs. Wm. 
Loewy, Mrs. J. C. Meussdorfler, Mrs. 
H. W. Hansen, Mrs. Wm. Ophuls, 
Mrs. H. St. Goar, Mrs. N. Ohlandt, 
Mrs A. B. C. Dohrmann, Mrs. C. 
A. Bruns. 



if The Beauty Shop | 



Lucky Dog 
Jack — My wife has left my home. 
Jill— Lucky dog, mine hasn't left a 
thing. 




i$L_ 



^iiiiiiiii'iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii^Mi/^iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiinii!!//^. 

jl Phone Douglas 4393 — 

e 1 

" MME. H. E. BUEDELL, Coraetiere. = 

1 THE CORSET SHOP | 

g EXCLUSIVE AGENTS = 

| EEIN JOLIE, XA PRINCESSE and | 

= HENDERSON COESETS. = 



= 210 Stockton St., bet. Geary & Post 

~ San Francisco. 



t t 

*\* FOB SALE '*• 

♦j» A Wholesale and Retail "Wine y 

*t* and Liquor House, located in *t* 

A downtown San Francisco. A very A 

y old established business. The y 

*}* owner desires to go to Europe. *J* 

A For further particulars apply to A 

A room 3 47, at 49 Geary St. Tele- ♦> 

A phone Douglas 1871. ♦> 



MONET LOANED on Diamonds 
and Jewelry. 2 per cent per month. 
Columbia Loan Office, 3 Stockton 

street. Est. 1872 



Wedding Rings 



Watchmakers, Jewelers, Opticians. 
715 Market St, Nr. Third. 



PATRICK & CO. 

RUBBER STAMPS 

STENCILS 
SEALS 
BADGES 
SIGNS, ETC. 
560 Market St. San Francisco 




212 STOCKTON STREET 

UNION SQUARE 
SAN FRANCISCO. CAL 



Hair Dressing and Manicuring .». 
Toilet Preparations 
Electrolysis 

Exclusive Beauty Shop and 
.'. Specialists 

A •;• 

§ Telephone Garfield 8130 g 

•;..;..X«X«X~X«X":«:"X"M~X~X~>*X»*> 

LEGAL NOTICES. 



NOTICE TO CREDITORS 

Estate of Olney Speer, deceased. 

Notice is hereby given by the under- 
signed administrator of the estate of 
Olney Speer, deceased, to the creditors 
of and all persons having claims against 
the said deceased, to exhibit them with 
the necessary vouchers within 4 months 
after the first publication of this notice 
to the said administratorat the office of 
M. J. Hynes, Public Administrator, 858 
Phelan Building, San Francisco, Cali- 
fornia, which said office the undersigned 
selects as his place of business in all 
matters connected with said estate of 
Olney Speer, deceased. 

M. J. HYNES, 
Administrator of the estate of Olney 

Speer, deceased. 
Dated, San Francisco, Jan. 5, 1915. 



NOTICE TO CREDITORS 

Estate of Emily Ann Rooks. 

Notice is hereby given by the under- 
signed executrix of the last will and 
testament of Emily Ann Rooks deceased, 
to the creditors of and all persons hav- 
ing claims against the said deceased, 
to evhibit them with the necessary 
vouchers within ten months after the 
first publication of this notice to the 
said executrix at the office of her at- 
torney, Gerald C. Halsey, at 105 Mont- 
gomery Street, San Francisco, Cal., 
which said office the undersigned selects 
as her place of business in all matters 
connected with said estate of Emily Ann 
Brooks deceased. 

ADA MARGARET PLATH, 
Executrix of the will of Emily Ann 
Rooks, deceased. 

Dated, San Francisco, January 26, 
1915. 

GERALD C. HALSEY, 
Attorney for Executrix 
105 Montgomery Street, 
San Francisco, Cal. 



SUMMONS 

IN THE SUPERIOR COURT of the 
State of California, in and for the 
City and Countv of San Francisco. 
EDNA M. HEIN, Plaintiff, vs. PEDRO 
GARCIA and BONITA GARCIA, his 
wife, defendant. Edward Lande, at- 
torney for plaintiff. 

No. 59413. Action brought in the Su- 
perior Court of the State of California 
in and for the City and County of San 
Francisco, and the complaint filed in the 
office of the County Clerk of said City 
and County. 

THE PEOPLE OF THE STATE OF 
CALIFORNIA SEND GREETINGS TO: 
Pedro Garcia and Bonita Garcia, his 
wife, defendants. 

YOU ARE HEREBY DIRECTED to ! 
appear and answer the complaint in an 
action entitled as above, brought against 
you in the Superior Court of the State 
of California, in and for the City and 
County of San Francisco, within ten 
days after the service on you of this 
alias summons — if served within this 
City and County; or within thirty days 
if served elsewhere. 

And you are hereby notified that un- 
less you appear and answer as above 
required, the said Plaintiff will take 
judgment for the money or damages de- 
manded in the complaint as arising upon 
contract or will apply to the Court for 
the relief demanded in the complaint. 

GIVEN under my hand and seal of 
the Superior Court at the City and Coun- 
ty of San Francisco, State of California, 
this 5th day of December, A. D. 1914. 

K. I. MULCREVY, Clerk. 
(SEAL) By H. Brunner, 

Deputy Clerk. 



THE WASP 



The Wasp I 



Is the Livest Publication 
in San Francisco 

Subscribe for IT 
Advertise in * 1 



© 




The Wasp 
Publishing Co. 

49 Geary St. Phone Douglas 1871 







Wellington Coal 

Best for Family Use 
For Sale by All Dealers 



Western Fuel Co. 



MINERS AND SHIPPERS 




Asparagus Gin 

(Folsom Brand) 

Made of Select and Fresh As- 
paragus and Double Stamp 
Gin 



It is a very pleasant Tonic 
recommended for Kidney and 
Bladder Troubles and agree- 
able to the taste. 



IN GENERAL 
FAMILY USE 



For Sale by 

Leading Drug, Grocery and 

Liquor Stores 

The Rothenberg Co. 



140 Front St., 



San Francisco 



Mme. Mariette Corset* 

Women with a love for fine un- 
dergarments will be delighted with 
the finished workmanship and ex- 
quisite materials of the Mme. Ma- 
riette Corsets. 

They are designed by French 
artists for American women. 

Freedom of motion and natural- 
ness of pose are the present re- 
quirements in corsetry. The light- 
ness and flexibility of the Mme. 
Mariette corsets, the low bust ef- 
fects, secure the utmost mobility 
to the wearer. 

Let our expert corsetieres show 
you the charming new Mme. Ma- 
riette models. 

Prices $5.00 to $25.00. 

D. SAMUELS 

THE LACE HOUSE 

N. W. Cor. Stockton and O'Farrell 



Sultan Turkish Baths 

624 POST STREET 

Special Department for Ladies 

Open Day and Night for Ladies and 
Gentlemen. 

Al. Johnson, formerly of Sutter Street 
Hammam has leased the Sultan Turkish 
Baths, where he 'will be glad to see hia 
old and new customers. 



LA GRANDE & WHITES 
LAUNDRY CO. 



Office »nd Worki: 234 Twelfth st. 

Bet. Howard and Folsom Sta. 

SAN FRANCISCO. - - CALIFORNIA 

Telephone Market 916 



Office Houn 
9 a. a. to 5:20 p. a. 
Pfcooe Doualu 1501 



ReodeQcc 
573 Fifth At«iu 
Houn 6 to 7:30 jj. ■. 
Phone Padfc 275 



W. H. PYBURN 
NOTARY PUBLIC 

Mr Motto "ALWAYS IN" 

Od parie Fraacaia Sc habla Ejpaao 

Office: 229 Montgomery Street 
Sao Fruciaco CtforoU 



Send for Our Select List of 

EIGHTY CALIFORNIA PAPERS 

You can insert Display 

Ads in the entire list for 

EIGHT DOLLARS AN INCH 



Pake Advertising Agency, Inc. 



432 S. MAIN ST. 
Los Angeles 



121 SECOND ST. 
San Francisco 



Valuable Information 

Of a Business, Personal or Social Nature 

from the Prea of the 

Pacific Coast 

ALLEN'S 

Press Clipping Bureau 

88 riRST STREET 

SAN FRANCISCO, CALIFORNIA 
Telephone Kearny 392 



TAKE A TRAVEL TIP 

Swift, Safe Electric Service Via the 

Oakland, Antioch & 
Eastern Railway 

Between San Francisco, Oakland, Berke- 
ley, Sacramento, Chlco, OroviUe, 
Marysville, Colusa, Wood- 
land and Pittsburg- 



Observation Cars 
For Comfort 



Key Route Ferry 
in San Francisco 



Sutter 2339 



Automatic Block 
Signals for Safety 




fortieth and Shafter 
Avenue 
In Oakland 
Piedmont 870 



San Francisco's Restaurant de Luxe 

Adjoining the Columbia Theatre 

Tou do not know this city until you have dined at FRED SOLARI'S, 
San Francisco's most palatial restaurant. "World famous for its dis- 
tinctive cuisine and polite service. 

DANSANTS EVERY EVENING 
EXCEPT SUNDAY 

In main dining room, under direction of competent lady manager, A 
place of beauty and refinement and the right people about you. 

FRED SOLARI'S GRILL 

CORNER MASON AND GEARY STREETS 



I 



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IIIIIHIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIH 



THE 

PANAMA-PACIFIC EXPRESS 

Daily Scenic Observation Train Eastward 

THROUGH THE 

SIERRAS AND ROCKIES 

by Daylight 



Omaha — St. Louis — Kansas City 
and Chicago 



TICKET OFFICES: 
665 MARKET STREET 1326 BROADWAY, OAKLAND 

Phone Sutter 1651 Phone Oakland 132 

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Golden State Limited 

VIA LOS ANGELES 

Chicago, St. Louis, 
Kansas City 

From San Francisco, Ferry Station 
6:00 P.M. DAILY 



Soothem Pacific 

The Exposition Line — 1915 — First in Safety. 






NIGHT AND DAY SERVICE 

Franklin Engraving Co. 




DESIGNERS, ILLUSTRATORS! 

THREE COLOR HALF TONE WORKl 

HALF TONE&ZINC ETCHING.^ 



118 Columbus Avenue 
San Francisco, Cal. 

Our Art Department Creates Distinctive and Original Designs 
for Booklets, Newspaper Advertising and all Stationery 
of Highest Quality. 

The Photo-Engraving Department Produces Cuts in all the 
Modern Processes of Tri-color, Multi-color, Copper 
Halftones, Zinc Etchings and Embossing Dies 



Vol. LXXllI— No. 7 



SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 13, 1915 



Price 10 cents 





WEEKLY JOURN, 
ILLUSTRATION -*» COMMENT 

ESTABLISHED ^ 1876 









I 






RESULT S FO R 1914 

The Pacific Mutual 

Life Insurance Company 

of California 

FORTY-SEVENTH YEAR 



GEO. I. COCHRAN, President 



GAIL B. JOHNSON, Vice-President 



Total Assets $ 32,604,612.25 

Gain in Assets for the Year 3,266,460.26 

Cash Income 9,506,116.05 

Gain in Cash Income over 1913 426,250.30 

Total Life Insurance in Force 154,525,447.00 

Gain in Life Insurance in Force 9,485,254.00 

New Life Insurance Issued and Paid for in 1914 22,805,828.00 

Accident Premiums Collected in 1914 1,876,579.49 

Total Payments to Policyholders (Life- Accident) 1914 3,690,791.83 

Grand Total Paid Policyholders Since Organization 40,410,883.83 

Total Reserves Held for Policyholders (December 31, 1914) . . . 27,590,612.63 

Gain in Reserves over 1913 2,509,016.30 

Surplus Funds (Not including fully paid capital of #1,000,000) 

Gain in Surplus over 1913 

Dividends Paid to or Set Aside for Participating Policyholders 

1914 

Average Interest on Mean Invested Assets 6.23 per cent 

MOST LIBERAL POLICY ISSUED 

Combines Protection Against Death, Accident and Sickness in One Contract 



2,989,845.57 

610,315.37 

1,095,373.74 



KILGARIF & BEAVER, Managers 



F. A. STEARNS, Manager 

Accident Dept. 



E. G. BATH, Manager 

Monthly Premium Dept, 



Offices: Shreve Building, San Francisco 
Send for Detailed Statement 



rHE-"*WASP 



LEADING HOTELS AND RESORTS 



Have You Dined in the 

Palace Hotel 
Court? 

Service and Cuisine Perfect 



Fairmont Under Same Management 



Palace Hotel Company 



The management of the 

Hotel St. Francis 

announces the inauguration of dancing in 

the Rose Room, weekday evenings 

Dancing 9 o'clock. 

Dinner and Supper a la Carte 

Geary street entrance or 

through hotel 



| FAIRMONT HOTEL | 

• Recognized as the most complete and beautiful residence hotel in the • 

• world. 500 rooms, every one with attached bath. 

• The Rendezvous of the discriminating' travelers from every land 

' Largest floor space devoted to public use of any hotel in the world. ' 

S EUROPEAN PLAN 

PALACE HOTEL COMPANY 

• SAN FRANCISCO J 

2 ' 1 Person $3.00 to $5.00 5 

5 I Persons $5.00 to $8.00 J 






i 
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Hotel Somcrton 

NOW OPEN 
440 GEARY STREET Opposite Columbia Theatre 
Connected with Cecil Hotel and under same management. 
350 Rooms, Single and En Suite. Newly Furnished — Strictly First Class 

MRS. W. F. MORRIS, Proprietor 



I 
y 
v 

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Y 

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W^ H « H « M » M « H rt H t"A H »"A"A"A H A B < H t H i^t K r'i w i%"« M / , A H t^^ w ^ 



HOTEL OAKLAND 

OAKLAND 

Table d'Hote Dinners 

Tuesdays, Thursdays, Sundays 

$1.25 Per plate with wine 

Informal Dinner Dansants Thursdays VICTOR REITER, Manager 



! Special Notice 

X During January we will give free a pretty wine tray with * 

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X Phone Sutter 4031 



JULES RESTAURANT 




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Every Thursday and Saturday Evenings 



Dinner with Wine $1.00 
675 MARKET STREET 



Dancing at 7 p. m. 

OPP. CHRONICLE 



Established 1853 

Monthly Contracts $1.50 per Month 

NEW WORKS JUST ERECTED AT 

27 TENTH STREET, S. F. 

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LEADING CHINESE 
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Cor. California, 

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Chinatown 



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San Francisco's Fashionable Society, Play and Frolic, in The WASP 



Will Bryan do this 
A group <if Italian artists have 
appeared to Secretary of State Bry- 
an to save the treasures of art in 
belligerent Europe, which will 
fioubtlessly be destroyed unless 
- such action is taken. The ap- 
peal is signed by Kleanora Duse, the 
actress; Ouglielmo Ferrero, the his- 
torian; Bestolfi, the sculptor; Aris- 
tide Sartorio, the painter, and Gia- 
coino Boni, the archaeologist. 

None of these but are several 
times greater than Mr. Bryan or 
any other of the politicians at 
Washington, except, perhaps, the 
President who is not a politician. 
Yet will Mr. Bryan heed the re- 
quest? He who is anxious to be- 
queath the world his various 
speeches, who loves the grandiose 
like an African loves fat, should 
surely take decisive action to save 
the immortal art of Belgium and 
Fiance, of Warsaw, and perhaps 
Germany later on. All the deeds 
of his life would not sum as great 
as this. In spite of his resemblance 
to Pra Elbert, it would make him 
Immortal. 



The Boys From the North 

Private advices state that the first 
Canadian contingent of 32,000 men, 
who have been at Salisbury for 
three months, arc in Prance, or on 
their way there, and that they will 
be on the firing line soon. The 
cavalry are already across the Chan- 
nel. 

The Canadian troops will after all 
go to the war as an army division, 
with the prospect that when the 

sin eding contingents arrive, they 

will be welded into one corps. The 
men are in good shape. 

Dispatches show that the whole 
camp was happy to receive march- 
ing orders. The men had chafed 
under the restraint of English army 
discipline, but they accepted con- 
ditions as they found them, and all 
they wanted was to be allowed to 
go to the firing line as soon as pos- 
sible. It was not known from what 
port they would embark. 

As soon as the first contingent 
have moved from Salisbury, it is ex- 
pected that the second contingent 
of 25,000 men, now in concentration 
camps in various parts of Canada, 
will proceed to England. 

"I hear that Doodley's wife has 
left him without any reason." 

"So? Well, in that ease she left 
him as she found him.' 



cZ&WASP 



RENO RE-ESTABLISHES ITSELF 

Money is responsible for many sins. Reno, thinking to re-legislate 
itself into a boom, has influenced the Nevada lawmakers to restore 
to it the six-months divorce law. It needed doctoring for things 
were had. It had fallen to the condition of a mere tanktown. Ladies 
glanced at ii in passing through, shrugged their shoulders and that 
was all. Rather than reside there longer than the customary six- 
months they would keep their husbands, much as they disliked them. 
It takes more than the spineless cactus of Luther Rurbank to make 
a smiling, pocket-clinking Nevada. 

Bui Reno knew what was the matter with it, the particular piece 
of ginger it needed under its belt. It needed its former aggregation 
of silk lingerie, clutched free from the grasp of worthless husbands. 
ii needed renewed notoriety in the newspapers of the world, the 
flowing money of the silent and the mysterious, the veiled beauties 
who lingered patiently to shake a mate. Without these things Reno 
found that it had no 'class," that it possessed not even sandwich 
attraction. Now madame, representing the eternal feminine, with 
rosy, gentle, unringed fingers will pluck it softly back from its 
near sand-burial. And Reno is preparing to enjoy the sensation, 
Reno where "freedom" is so dear to the heart and purse, where 
every shister lawyer blooms like a morning-glory. In fine, Reno has 
become again the cancer-spot of the country. 

The social structure of the whole United States is honey-combed 
and ant-eaten with this business of divorce. In some States the 
laws are more stringent than in others, but, generally speaking, a 
divorce is the very easiest of matters. In California little trouble 
is ever experienced. You shake the tree and down conies your divorce- 
The courts seem all of one mind and temperament — the mind and 
temperament of a philanderer. It would appear that they do not 
think of it as separating a man and his wife, of making children 
motherless or fatherless, but of separating merely a man and his 
mistress. 

The ideals of mariage have fallen to a low level. Most marriages, 
as a matter of fact, are nothing more than "trial marriages." The 
thought behind is the motive of the contract. "If I do not like it 
T can get a divorce." Can any ceremony legalize an affair of that 
kind? Where are all the bright-eyed children of love that should 
be born in the world but appear with the unmeaning faces of pennies? 
Indeed, one might ask where are there children at all? As an in- 
cumbrance to dissolution they have gone out of fashion and may yet 
become so rare that nurseries will be changed to museums. 

And yet a child is the most wonderful being in the world, and 
marriage is the most wonderful thing in the world. For true mar- 
riage should mean always the faith, sacrifice, and hope of love. 

No woman can come out of a strange pair of hands and be the 
same. All the science of the world cannot reconstruct a rose. The 
easy divorce is a huge national immorality, and more than that it is 
a particular immorality of the State of California. 

On the Western shore and facing the Orient, we must hold the 
loveliness and height of our dreams. No people are greater or 
higher than their hearts. And the thought in marriage is the very 
heart of life. One happy fireside is more than a million dollars. 
The very nation revolves around it. For that reason marriage 
cannot be undertaken lightly and the people are lost who regard 
it lightly. 



A Scamp and Piker 
The recent publicity regarding 
Howard Harron, the attorney, and 
"the other woman" whom his wife 
found together in common domi- 
cile, reveals a most unpleasing side 
of the affinity business, and shows 
up the man as a piker and a scamp, 
It is too bad that there are so many 
others like him. The affinity had 
youth and a few other things. The 
wife had gray hair, some starving 
children Harron had brought into 
the world, and a capacity for being 
true to him. She had played an 
honest game and the man strayed 
afield. He lacked the imagination 
to clothe truth, to remain in love 
with the woman who had made his 
home, so be must chase thistledown 
because it glinted in the sun. And 
every third man you meet on the 
street is like him. One tires of the 
average male psychology after a 
while— it is so rotten. A woman 
who is true and makes a home is 
worth while remaining with these 
days. There are not so very many 
homes in San Francisco and far too 
few in the United States. 




Love of Loves 

Love well your loves; love your 
love who dreameth, with a rose at 
his lips and flowers in his eyes; it 
is he whom you seek when your 
April dawn ariseth, on whom a fra- 
grance doth rest when you are old. 

Love you the love who doth play- 
in the sun of colors, under the azure 
of Greece, around its altars, and 
who unrolleth to heaven her tresses 
and girdles, or emptieth a quiver 
on hearts immortal. 

Love you the love who speakcth 
with the low leisure of Ave Marias 
under the vaulted arch; it is he to 
whom you pray when your head is 
weary, ho whose voice doth return 
to you the cradle's rhythm. 

Love you the love God breatheth 
over our mire, love you blind love, 
lighting his torch of flame, love you 
the love in dream that seemeth like 
to our angel, love you the love that 
is promised to the ashes of the 
grave ! 

Love you the ancient love of the 
reign of Saturn, love you the charm- 
ing god, the hidden god who hung, 
like a moth of the night, an invis- 
ible kiss on the lips of Psyche! 

# * # * # 

Beggar— I haven't tasted food for 
a month! 

Jones— You ain't missing much. 
It's the same old taste! 



THE WASP 



Saturday, February 13, 1915 




INS AND OUTS OF 
THE SOCIAL WORLD 



BY GRACE TIBBITS 




A History of Surprise 

The day of miracles is surely not 
past— at least that is why society 
is gasping at one another ever since 
both Jack Spreckels and his bril- 
liant ex-wife, Edith Huntington 
Spreckels have announced their be- 
trothals. Of course we have all of 
us had our own little, ideas on the 
subject— but the general impression 
has always been that if Jack and 
Edith ever contemplated double 
barriers again it would be only a re- 
vowing of their first vows, as they 
have been on quite the friendliest 
and most sociable terms ever since 
the signing of their first papers. 
They have both attended the same 
parties where they always dance at 
least once together and so it goes. 
But now, however, the truth is 
out, though both acknowledge it 
rather reluctantly as there must 
elapse a full six months before the 
final divorce can be granted. 

Jack Spreckels' name has been 
linked with that of charming Sidi 
Wirt for lo, these many months, 
and it was even hinted that his at- 
tentions to the pretty dancer was 
the cause of the divorce. 

She first gained notoriety out here 
when she came from New .York to 
the Potter Hotel in Santa Barbara 
to conduct the winter dances there 
a year ago. As to the success of her 
dances there, actions speak louder 
than words and the male members 
of Santa Barbara's dancing set were 
completely carried off their feet. So 
successful was she that before her 
contracted time was up Mrs. Potter 
settled up her financial agreements 
with her and bade her leave the 
mission town, where men are very 
much at a premium. 

She is quite a tall and a decided 
brunette, built on long, lithe lines,' 
with a charmingly youthful and al- 
most boyish physique, and of 
course up-to-date enough in her 
dancing to realize that grace and 
corsets don't go together. The con- 
vivial Jack met her some two or 
three years ago in the East and 
worshipped ardently at her shrine 
last winter, making frequent and 
oft' trips down the coast. 

She is not the usual ballroom 
dancer in any way, however, being 
the daughter of the late Edward 
Wirt, who at one time was an ex- 
tremely wealthy and prominent cat- 
tleman of the middle West. Sud- 
den business reverses threw the 
lovely Sidi very much on her own 
hands and she turned to the danc- 
ing professions as her only means of 
support. 

Mrs. Jack's betrothal comes as 
much more of a bombshell than 
does Jack's, as it had been hinted 
many times that she intended de- 
voting herself to art and literature, 
giving the other sex an extremely 
wide berth. She and Prank Wake- 



field claim to be victims of that il- 
lusive bird — love at first sight — as 
their acquaintance only dates back 
a few months. Prank Wakefield, it 
will be remembered, was the tall 
and good-looking husband of Lena 
Sefton of San Diego, where their 
romance had its beginning. She was 
the daughter of the wealthy Seftons 
and a sister of Joe Sefton, who mar- 
ried pretty little Helen Thomas, 
whom the artist Sardona considers 
one of the five prettiest San Fran- 
cisco women. After their marriage 
they came to San Francisco to live, 
where two years or so ago, Mrs. 
Wakefield filed suit for divorce. No 
sooner had the divorce been grant- 
ed, however, than she and Captain 
Benjamin Clark, TJ. S. A., quietly 
slipped off and were married much 
to the Sefton senior's disgust. They 
are now living in New York, where 
Captain Clark is stationed. 



And Still They Wonder 

Another bomb-shell in our quiet 
midst is the news of the marriage 
of Paul Cowles, superintendent of 
the Central division of the Asso- 
ciated Press, to Mrs. Charlotte M. 
Wynne of Lombard, Illinois. The 
wedding was celebrated at the home 
of Mrs. Wynne's brother, John P. 
Moses, in Chicago, and Mr. and Mrs. 
Cowles intend residing at Lombard. 
Paul Cowles is extremely well- 
known out here, where he has been 
for years connected with the As- 
sociated Press. He is the father of 
that stunning, statuesque beauty, ■ 
Miss Helen Elizabeth Cowles, whose 
engagement to young Kenneth 
Davis, the Wingfield Scott Davises 
son, was announced last autumn, 
but has since been broken. Cowle's 
first wife was Miss Mabel Curtis, the 
youngest of the three stunning 
daughters of the James Marvin Cur- 
tises, and considered the most beau- 
tiful. It was after their union was 
blessed by the advent of the tiny 
daughter that Mrs. Cowles began 
to be troubled with melancholia, 
which the devotion and attention 
of her husband seemed utterly pow- 
erless to relieve, and which preyed 
on her mind for many months. So 
that when her sudden and tragic 
death occurred, no one really ever 
knew whether it was accidental or 
with suicidal intent. At any rate 
Cowles has remained a widower for 
two score years and more while the 
little daughter Helen Elizabeth has 
always made her home with her 
grandmother, Mrs. Curtis. 

Helen Curtis, the late Mrs. Cowle's 
oldest sister, married the late Thom- 
as Magee, senior, whose children 
were nearly the age of their hand- 
some step-mother, and Eliztbeth 
Curtis married Dennis O'Sullivan, 
the famous Irish tenor, whose 
death several years ago was an ir- 



reparable loss to the world of mu- 
sic. 

Mrs. Graham's Motive 
Like the conquering hero after 
winning a great battle returns to 
his home to rest, so now is William 
Miller Graham, planning to return 
to the oil fields of Oklahoma, to re- 
cuperate after the strenuousness of 
the blighted Graham divorce suit. 
Earl Graham," who has been spend- 
ing the past year or so in Okla- 
homa, beat it post haste for Santa 
Barbara at the first war cloud on 
the Graham senior's horizon and it 
was through him, I hear, that the 
affair has ended peacefully. Earl 
has sort of grown up during his 
absence from the mission town, and 
his stunning good looks and charm- 
ing manners are sort of taking the 
petticoat portion of society by 
storm. 

In the meantime Mrs. Graham is 
remaining behind locked doors, re- 
fusing to see any one, until some 
of the talk at least has died down. 
When the divorce was at first made 
public every one said: "At last, dear 
Eleanor must be landing a title, for 
she would never part with genial 
Billy Graham unless it was to enter 
the nobility" — but wrong again. I 
guess, for Billy, who waxes most 
confidential over his troubles, says 
that when Eleanor recovers suffi- 
ciently, he proposes to return to 
"Bellos Guardo" and resume the ev- 
en tenor of his ways. 

* * * # 

Ah! My Heart! 
What ho! — for the Golden Horse 
Guards of the P. P. I. E. — who in- 
tend slaughtering hearts by the 
million in their gold bedecked uni- 
forms and prancing mounts. Fifty- 
three of them in all— headed by one 
rotund friend Courtney Ford. Cap- 
tain Ford, from now on, with such 
gallant riders with them as Roy 
Pike, Leon Siebes and George 
Busch, but where is Bill Lange. 
Golden Horse Guards without Bill 
— Never! Surely the step is not too 
wide from the professional ball 
players costume to real gold braid — 
well, not in California at any rate! 
Why not have it a real millionaires 
squadron like the Seventy-First 
New Yorkers and get such men as 
the Parrott boys, the Tevises, Wil- 
liam and George Seibe, and Alfred 

Harwood? 

* * # # 

Lily a Mystery 

Society is all agog over the latest 
news from the Peter Martin house- 
hold, which is that the stately Lily 
now refuses to let Mother Martin see 
her cherished Peter at all. Under 
lock and key is that amiable son 
of luxury, with his stern wife as 
warden, and no kind hearted mam- 
ma to come and listen to his griev- 
ances. 

Whether the dashing Lily is 
afraid of him or whether his con- 
dition is not so serious as she 
makes out — no one knows — but 
Lily herself. At any rate she has 
brought the wrath of the entire 
Martin clan down on her head and 



they are all vowing vengeance, I 
hear. By the by, Lily's cousin-in- 
law, Mrs. Herman Oelrichs has just 
arrived from the east and we are 
all muchly interested in whether 
Mrs. Peter will be included in the 
entertainments that will be given 
for Tessie Fair. She intends remain- 
ing here for two months at least, 
and as she has a host of friends 
here, will be elaborately dined and 
wined. 

* * * * 

A Jealous Man 

Society is quite bubbling over 
with delight over the news that 
pretty little Mrs. Albert Reis is com- 
ing out here again with the inten- 
tion of remaining for quite some 
time. Lieutenant Albert Reis, TJ. S. 
N. is now stationed on the "Nebras- 
ka" and will arrive here with the 
fleet this month. The dashing Jen- 
ny Lee before her marriage, is to be 
a guest of her sister, Mrs. B. F. 
Schlessinger, during her visit. The 
Reis were stationed at Goat Island 
for nearly two years during which 
time Jenny was quite one of the 
most popular of the younger ma- 
trons in society. Speaking of the 
Reis, everyone is wondering wheth- 
er Albert Reis, who looks not un- 
like Douglas Crane, has gotten over 
any of that mad jealousy he has 
always displayed toward his wife. 
If any man so much as looked in 
Jenny's direction he almost had Al- 
bert to fight for it and many times 
have I seen her dragged off nearly 
by the back of her pretty hair, be- 
cause someone was saying too many 
nice things to her. She was a great 
pal of Kate Henry's before either of 
them were married, and the con- 
trast between the tall blonde Kate 
and chic little Jenny was almost lu- 
dicrous. 

* * * * * 

The Importance of a Kiss 

Society, particularly the male por- J 
tion of it which centers about the | 
various clubs, are once more breath- 
ing freely after the mental strain of ! 
a certain divorce case of last week, j 
The case in question was one of 
those deeply involving affairs in 
which the husband seemed to re- 

<~:~K»:~:~x«x-:..x~K..:~>.>.>.x~:">'K'* 
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| Shreve & Company | 



(Established 1852) 

Jewelry 
Platinum and Gold 

Tableware 
Sterling Silver and Plate 

Leather Goods 
unmounted and mounted 
with 14k. Gold and Silver 



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Post Street and Grant Avenne 
San Franclsoo 



Saturday, February 13, 1915 



THE WASP 



jenl a veritable kissing bee, in 
which wifi'y dear played the lead- 
ing rule. Now there's really no 
treat harm in a kiss occasionally, 

hut it looks so silly to read ol it 
in print, hence the trembling in 

clubdom, several of whose most 
prominent members were mad 
enough to burst on reading of 
their little tete a tetes In the morn- 
ing paper. No one dared SO much 
as snicker at a victim, for tile hus- 
band's wrath was a far-reaching 
thing, and lie was hitting right and 
left. For a time it almost threat- 
ened to rival the famous Long di- 
vorce case or that ease, now ancient 
plstory, of the J. J. Moores. 

Hut fortunately the affair is set- 
tled now and those whose fair 
name- arc still lily white, are offer- 
ing up thanks to the Almighty. 
Bather a coincidence of it was that 
one man whose kisses were perhaps 
more ardent than any of the oth- 
ers, or at least Friend Husband 
thought they were, announced his 
engagement to a fair divorcee be- 
fore the ink of his recent newspaper 
notoriety was dry. 

* * * -x- 

From the Windy City 
One of the most interesting guests 
at the Hotel del Coronado is Miss 
Ejoleta Armour of Chicago, who 
came out to California to visit her 
cousin Philip Dangforth Armour, 
and his pretty bride. Miss Armour, 
it will he remembered, was the crip- 
pled daughter of the millionaire 
beef packer, .T. Ogden Armour, and 
was one of the most remarkable 
cases cured by Dr. Lorenz. Miss Lo- 
lita was a sad little invalid, strap- 
ped to a bed and made to move 
in any way. The great German spe- 
cialist operated on her and to ev- 
eryone's amazement, she was soon 
able to be up and about. And now 
except for a slight limp she is as 
normal and athletic as any girl. 
She is rather short and dark com- 
plcxed and is quite a contrast to 
Mrs. Philip Armour, who is a slip 
of a pink and white maid, with 
soft wavy golden hair. The Ar- 
mours, who are being extensively 
entertained in the south, intend 
coming to San Francisco before re- 
turning to Chicago. 



Thoroughbreds 

The Horse Show of this week 
quite took us back a score or more 
years ago to those Horse Shows 
we used to have at the old Me- 
chanics Pavilion when Walter Ho- 
bart would be the real matinee idol 
of each performance. Seated on his 
wonderful mounts, in his immacu- 
late riding togs, Walter was a sight 
long to be remembered, and to ride 
with him in any of his double tan- 
dem teams was quite the height of 
bliss for any maid. Now Walter is 
as wedded to his eighty horse pow- 
er "Red Devil" as he ever was to 
any of his thoroughbreds. 

The maids of the younger set were 
most conspicuous this year, and 
made a truly attractive picture on 
their saddle horses, each being 
quite the dennier cri in English rid- 



ing breeches and high hoots. Phyl- 
lis ti,. Young, Beatrice Nickel, Gert- 
rude Hopkins, and Aunc Peters 

were all equally smart 

* • • * 

On Second Thoughts 
The course of true love never 
seems to run very smoothly and 

couples seem t<> border on the very 

verge of divorce only to patch UP 
their differences and start out 
again for calmer seas. A certain 
couple very prominent in the world 
of fashion whose wedded bliss only 
dates back a couple of years or so, 
came to a real open rupture several 
months ago. The irate husband 
packed his belongings and left the 
attractive Pacific Avenue apart- 
ment, and the wife who had been 
married before, once more saw years 
of widowhood before her. But after 
the hasty step had been taken and 
each contemplated the affair in a 
calmer mood, they decided that it 
was all foolishness and that they 
would give double harness ono more 
trial. Thus like unto the King of 
France, who bravely marched up 
the hill only to march down again, 
came back the husband bag and 
baggage, and now they are as hap- 
py as two turtle-doves. The society 
columns are full of their entertain- 
ments for the wife's two daughters, 
and the dove of peace seems to be 
planted there for good and all. 

■X- * * x- 

A June Wedding 
Robert Sharon and pretty Hazel 
Ingels of Oakland have decided to 
be married early in June at the In- 
gels home on Oak street. Miss In- 
gels, who took a course at the Uni- 
versity of California, is one of the 
most popular belles of east bay so- 
ciety, and young Sharon, who be- 
longs to the William Sharon family 
of Piedmont, is one of the most 
sought after beaux. He is a broth- 
er of Florence Sharon, now Mrs. 
Herbert Hamilton Brown and of 
Mrs. Harry Farr of Piedmont. Fred 
Sharon is a cousin, and he is a 
grandson of the late Senator Wil- 
liam Sharon of Nevada. 

-X- -x- -x- # 

Maids Raise Dogs 

Miss Edith Chesebrough startled 
society nearly out of its senses the 
other day by announcing her in- 
tention of going into the raising of 
dogs with a commercial view. Of 
course we have always known that 
the athletic Edith has never cared 
a rap for anything all of her life 
except golf and dogs, but the idea 
of her establishing kennels and 
raising dogs for the market comes 
as rather startler. Ever since the 
death of their father, the late A. 
Chesebrough, both the girls decided 
to do something in a business way 
with the idea of padding out their 
income a bit, as the Chesebrough 
estate was battered quite beyond 
recognition by the failure of the 
■shipping Arm of Bates & Chese- 
brough. So the raising of Aire- 
dales became their chosen vocation 
and they have joined the ranks of 
society workers. By the by, speak- 
ing of society bread-winners, I hear 



that the two Brewer girls, Marie and 
Elena, are making a great success 
of their real estate business, as are 
Mrs. Randall Hunt and .Mrs. V. < >. 

Alexander. 

***** 

Some Thin Costumes 
The Oriental ball of last week 
which was given by Howie Dctrick's 
Assembly, was quite the gala occa- 
sion for the younger set of the win- 
ter, and was fully as marvelous an 
affair as it was predicted to he. Of 
course several years ago people 
thought differently, some of the cus- 
toms would have been rather se- 
verely criticized, for they were truly 
Oriental as to material and style. 
A lace pantaloon which displayed 
a shapely calf ,or the gauziest of 
chiffon draperies were quite de 
rigeur and maids from our oldest 
and most respected families 
looked as though they might 

(Continued on Page 11) 

MRS. SARAH CECILIA CRANE 

Emmanuel Practitioner 

Hours 10 to 4 

1452 Divisadero St., near Geary St. 

Phone Fillmore 3929 



To visit San Francisco without see- 
ing A. An. hews' Diamond Palace would 

o visiting Europo witl t seeing 

I'm,-. It is a lea, ling feature of San 
Francisco, a marvel of beauty and ele- 
gai ce, ami is unquestionably the most 
magnificent jewelry store in the world. 
Visitors and rosidents are cordially in- 
vite,] to examine the marvels of genius 
at 30 Kearny Street. Established 1850. 
Open S a. ni. to 5:30 p. in. 



Phone Kearny 2578 



FOR EXCLUSIVE CUSTOM MADE 
SUITS AND GOWNS 



165 POST STREET SAN FRANCISCO 



w \ \ \ \ \ \ \ \ \ \ \y 

4 phone Franklin 5062 

% < 

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Formerly F. Gerard of New York 



fi 

$ Sowns and S/3 l o u s o s V 

''/:, For Sale and Made to Order W 

'4 ( 476 O'FARRELL STREET ! 'i 

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SCHOOLS 




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|5 \l to which to send yojr boys 5 1 

5 or girls, you should rcmem- IS 
(8 ber that practically all the expert § 
iS short-hand reporters of the State W 
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6 Short-Hand System is the best, <5 
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a them to g 

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I Business College I 

*§ 1256 MARKET STREET £ 

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?, and Evening Classes. £» 



HEAUS" 5 



RUSSIAN IMPERIAL 
SCHOOL OF DANCING 

VERONINE VESTOFF 
(Late associate of Favlowa) 

The Imperial Russian 
Ballet School Maintained 
by the Czar of Russia for 
training children to dance, 
is famous throughout the 
world for having brought 
the art of dancing to a 
point of perfection not ap- 
proached in any other 
country. 

Veronine Vestoff is the 
only accredited representa- 
tive of this school in the 
United States. 
Chateau Bohlig — Pine and 
Powell Sts., San Francisco, Cal. 



COLLEGE 



1215 Van Nest A venae 
SAN FRANCISCO 



16th & San Pablo Ave. 
OAKLAND 



PUCKETT'S 
College of Dancing 

ASSEMBLY HALL, 1268 SUTTEE 
CLASSES: 

Beginners' Classes Mondays 

Classes and Socials. . . . Wednesdays 

TANGO CLASSES Thursdays 

Assemblies Fridays 

FOR PRIVATE LESSONS 
PHONE FRANKLIN 118 



THE KIBXAW STUDIOS 

OF MODERN DANCES 

Miss Claribel Kirby announces Mr. 
Gilbert Littlejohn has joined the teach- 
ing forces of this instituion. Private 
lessons or class instruction by appoint- 
ment only. Tea and refreshments if 
desired. 

435 Powell Street, 

Third Floor 

Telephone Sutter 2105 

Instructions given with improved 

methods — Fox Trot, Lulu Fado, One 

Step, Hesitation, Tango, Maxixe and all 

the new dances. 



A. MAHR B. MIECZKOWSK1 

Graduates of the Imperial School 

Russian Dancing School 

Imperial Method Taught 

1509 Gough Street, S. F. 

Telephone West 4935 



THE WASP 



Saturday, February 13, 1915 



cZ&WASP 

The Pacific Coast Weekly 



Published weekly by 

THE WASP PUBLISHING COMPANY (Inc.) 

49 GEARY ST., SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 

Phone, Song-las 1871 

MARTIAL, DAVOUST --- Managing Editor 

PAUL GWTNNE ------------ Editor 

GLENN H. JOHNSON Associate Editor 

GERALD C. HALSEY Attorney 

SUBSCRIPTION — In the United States, Canada, and Mexico, $5 a year in advance. 
Entered at the San Francisco Postoffice as second-class matter. 



The Wasp will gladly publish notices of social events and other 
items of interest to its readers. Manuscripts should be at this office 
not later than Wednesday morning of the week's issue. 



In his speech to the Electric Railway Association at Washington 
the President told his audience that "you are not going to be penaliz- 
ed because you are big and strong, ' ' and ' ' if your methods of competi- 
tion arc clear and above reproach, why then you ean pile these pro- 
fits as high as the Rockies and nobody will be jealous of it;" t'ur- 
ihermore "nobody is henceforth going to be afraid or suspicious of 
any business merely because it is big." It has not been so during the 
iast twenty years, particularly during the last ten years. Bigness has 
been a crime, the only crime proved, and the persistent attempts to 
punish it savagely have disturbed the industrial peace of the country, 
with disastrous results, in so much that the accruing losj may 
be fairly compared with the cost of a great war. 

"There is a new atmosphere for business," says Mr. Wilson. "It is 
ihe atmosphere of renewed public confidence. The mists and mias- 
matic airs of suspicion that have filled the business world have now 
been blown away." Let 'lis be devoutly thankful. A few months 
ago the President discovered that there was a new temper of the 
people. The new temper meant that the people had got tired of 
Seeing corporations crucified every day, that they bad found out 
that these endless prosecutions were really directed against them- 
selves, that the hurt was theirs, that when business was alarmed and 
capital made timid, they, all the people were the chief sufferers. It 
was not a new temper at all, it was a very old state of mind. The 
clear-seeing sensible men of the country had felt that way all the 
time. 



Vocational training appears to have come to the front as a panacea 
for all matrimonial ills. Among those who are strong advocates of it 
are Mr. Taft and Mrs. Havelock Ellis. They argue that when women 
become economically independent then will come the halcyon days 
when she will marry for love alone, and, as the story goes, "they will 
live happily ever after. ' ' 

In this condition we would say that if every woman who is a 
home maker today had been economically independent before mar- 
riage, America would not now have as many homes. Vocational 
training does not foster the love and desire for home making, neither 
does it eliminate the money question. A young woman who is draw- 
ing a salary of $2,000 does not care to marry any one who can not 
supply her with at least that much. 

Home making is an art. The wife is not merely the housekeeper — 
she is much more — she it is who sets up the Lares and Penates and 
makes them dwell wherever her lot is cast, whether it be in a cot or 
castle. 

The home life of Martha Washington's times, when Mount Vernon 
glowed with the warmth of hospitality, and every one who entered 
its doors felt the benediction of Christian family life, is much prefer- 
able to the cold cheerless modern ideals of a home. 

The higher education of women or her entering the profession 
should not be opposed , but one of the basic principles of the home 
is the protection and care by the man of those he loves, and when all 
women become economically independent and practically on a foot- 
ing with the male being, the home will vanish, and what will become 
of family life % 




A POOR RICH MAN 

One day last winter a group of 
American newspaper men sat in the 
foyer of the Savoy Hotel in London 
looking 'em over. Martin W. Little- 
ton, the New York lawyer, joined 
the group and helped look 'em over. 
Before long a portly, well groomed, 
elderly man who was about to pass 
caught sight of Littleton. He stop- 
ped and greeted the lawyer. His 
face brightened as he grasped his 
friend's hand. 

"I'm so glad to see you, Martin," 
he said. "Won't you ask your 
friends to excuse you for a few min- 
utes. I want to talk to you." 

He almost dragged Littleton from 
his chair in his eagerness and led 
the lawyer through the grill room 
toward the bar. 

Ten minutes later the two return- 
ed and the elderly man took an af- 
fectionate leave of his lawyer friend. 
"Boys," said Mr. Littleton as he 
rejoined the group of newspaper 
men, "there is the most pathetic 
case I know of. Of course you know 
that is Eugene Zimmerman. You 
have all seen him here in London, 
where he comes several times dur- 
ing the year. There's a man with 
an income of $2,000,000 a year who 
gets no pleasure out of it. He 
doesn't know how. He admits he 
doesn't know how. 

"While 'Beefy' was getting our 
Scotch he told me his troubles. 
'Martin,' he said, 'won't you come 
with me to Paris for a few days? 
Do, now, there's a good fellow. Why, 
man, I'm so tired of everything that 
I feel sometimes as if I couldn't 
stand it a minute longer.' 

"I told him I had to get back to 
New York next week and was sail- 
ing tomorrow so I couldn't go to 
Paris with him. 

" 'Then what shall I do with my- 
self?' he said. Tor heaven's sake tell 
me how to amuse myself! I stand it 
as long as I can in Cincinnati or 
New York, and then I jump on a 
boat and come over here. A few 
days in London is enough and then 
I ru ndown to the Duke's to see my 
daughter. One gets enough of Man- 
chester's company very soon, and I 
come back to London. 

" 'I stand it as long as I can and 
then make a run for Paris. Two 
days and I'm back here buying a 
ticket for New York. I can't seem 
to enjoy anything like other men. 
What's the matter with me? Tell 
me what to do. How ean I get a lit- 
tle pleasure out of life?' 

"I asked him if he liked young 
folks. I knew he did. His eyes 
brightened and he said: 'Martin, if 
I could have sweet young girls and 
fresh, wholesome young boys about 
me all the time I would be perfectly 
happy. I love to hear them laugh, 
and it gives me the greatest pleas- 
ure to listen to their chatter. But I 
can't find them, Martin. Tell me 
where I can find them.' 

"I told him to give a series of lit- 
tle dinners to the children of the 
many nice people he knew. Have 
them bring their governesses and 
tutors along. 'And don't forget 
this,' I said. 'About 9 o'clock you 



must get up from the table and 
say: "Now, young people, it's time 
for an old fellow like me to go to 
bed. Have all the fun you can and 
we'll meet again soon. Good night." 
"He thanked me with tears in his 
eyes for the suggestion. He's just 
gone off to see how soon he can 
have his first dinner. And he has 
an income of $2,000,000 a year." 



THE WICKED WHITE MAN 

A scathing arrangement of the 
conduct of the white man in Alaska 
toward the native is coupled with 
charges of wholesale and continu- 
al violations of liquor laws and 
laws to protect fur-bearing animals 
in Alaska and the Pribilof Islands, 
in a report submitted to President 
Wilson and Secretary Redfield by 
Dr. E. Lester Jones deputy commis- 
sioner of fisheries. Dr. Jones re- 
cently returned from Alaska where 
he spent six months making a sur-' 
vey of the fishing and fur seal in- 
dustry and studying the adminis- 
tration of the various islands. He 
concluded that proper regulation 
would be facilitated by vesting full 
authority in the Department of 
Commerce. Immediate steps for the 
protection of the natives and re- 
habilitation of their morals are urg- 
ed in this report. "The white man's 
lack of care and regard for the sanc- 
tity of the native's home is the 
crime of Alaska" he says. "In many 
sections the wife and daughters 
are dishonored and any resistance 
from the husband, father or broth- 
er is overcome by threats and 
bribes and liquor, until even the 
men have all their best impulses 
deadened and seem to be unman- 
ned. Wherever the white man has 
settled, the saloon prevails and 
that has had more to do with the 
ruin of the Indian and Aleut than 
all other causes. In sections where 
the saloon is not found, liquor 
reaches the natives in the form of 
pay and bribes." 

In one instance, the report says, 
a commissioner, a deputy marshal 
and deputy clerk of a court "were 
actually interested in /a cannery 
and did everything in their power 
to see that their private interests . 
were not molested and that their \ 
company was not prosecuted after 
it had been found violating the 
law." 

The report adds that is it abso- 
lutely necessary to have more boats 
and funds to enforce the laws. 
Without more vessels, it declares, 
it is almost useless to make laws to 
protect this great fishing industry, 
worth nearly $200,000,000 a year. 

The wholesale killing of fur-bear- 
ing animals by those who spend 
their time trapping and hunting, 
killing everything and anything at 
anytime of the year, the commis- 
sioner declares, has been conducted 
in some sections until it is now nec- 
essary to reach back into unexplor 
ed regions in order to keep up the 
supply of furs. The commissioner 
suggests the adoption of closed sea- 
sons, especially for salmon. 



Saturday, February 13, 1915 



T1IK WASP 



FOR YACHTSMEN 

YACHTSMEN have for a long 
timr felt that something 
should he done to keep wcll- 
buill yachts from depreciating in 
value as fast as they do. A man 
will have a yacht built to sonic class 
one year, and it may In' the fastest 
in that class. The next year an- 
other is built which is faster, and 
by the third season the first will 
be a drug on the market and will 
he -old to some one who wants a 
good cruiser, its racing days are 
over. Jt is felt that if by some sys- 
tem of rating a yacht as it grows 
plder might still have chances of 
{Tinning races its value would be 
much greater then when it is fit 
only for the handicap class. 

Harry L. Maxwell, who has owned 
and raced dozens of yachts, had an 
inspiration recently. He suggested 
that a yacht should have an allow- 
ance of about two second a mile for 
each year of its age. With this a 
yacht one year old would be allow- 
ed one minute over a 30 mile course, 
and a yacht ten years old would 
get ten minutes. Mr. Maxwell ar- 
gued that yachts of today are of no 
better model than yachts of fif- 
teen or twenty years ago, but that 
great improvement has been made 
in construction, in rigging and in 
sails. By improved methods of con- 
struction much weight has been 
saved and consequently hulls are 
much lighter than they used to be 
and they also are stanehcr. With 
less weight to drive, with better 
sails to drive with, and with light- 
ness of spars and rigging, it is nat- 
ural that a new yacht will sail away 
from an older one. Mr. Maxwell 
said that from his own personal ex- 
perience he had figured out two 
seconds a mile for each year, but 
that if some other system were ad- 
opted which would give the older 

•yacht a chance of success against 
a new one he would be just as well 

i pleased. 



Would Win the President 
Talk of ambitions! On the most 
intimate and truthful authority we 
have it that a lady imbedded in the 
higher social strata of our city, has 
set her cap for President Wilson 
and will endeavor to entrance him 
when he comes here. The bomb- 
throwers of Europe dwindle with 
this intelligence. The President 
knows not what danger he reckless- 
ly rushes toward. The lady is a 
Christian Scientist and expects to 
achieve him by silent, treatment. 
For such a man, she secretly admits, 
she would work for ten years. And, 
having once met him, she feels that 
Science will draw him to her. The 
chief difficulty in the matter, it 
would appear, is that the late Mrs. 
Wilson was one of the finest of all 
American women. Yet the sex will 
set their caps without respect to 
anything. 




QUARTER HOUR wTKETCHE S 
WOR.TH WHILE 

ARRANGED „,.</ J ELECT ED />»m ,A. 

PRIVATE COLLECTION r MR. JOHN H.TOLLEY 

MR. JOHN R. THORN BY /..«- (Ac 

AJP nmujlll HC COMPANY 




LOTUS ISLES OF RUSSIA 
By J. H. U. 

ONE of the uncxpioitcd para- 
dises left in Europe is the 
beautiful wooded country of 

Central Russia. 

None of the famed tourist ridden 
spots of Europe has ever seemed so 

restful, SO lotus like, so packed with 
deep forests, summer fields and 
kindly people as the hereditary es- 
tate along the upper Volga, where 
I was a guest two years ago. 

After a two-day journey from St. 
Petersburg, going by steamer from 
Rybinsk down the Volga, I arrived 
at the muddy, sleepy little river 
town of Putsches!!. My host met 
me with the trojka at the landing 
and drove me to the manor house. 
It took us four hours to travel the 
twenty versts, or fifteen miles, over 
the most atrocious road I have ever 
seen. There were bogs, water soaked 
meadows, and ditches and rain- 
drenched forests. Rude peasant 
carts wabbled along the miry road, 
the red shifted yamschik in each 
'one lying stretched out sound 
asleep on the hay. 

The Krasnova estate was a de- 
lightful surprise. Here in this syl- 
van paradise, at one time an ap- 
panage of Peter the Great, had 
Russian genius for artistic effect 
been at work. Nothing was over- 
done. Nothing was missing. 

A large log house sat in a clearing 
at the head of an unspeakably 
beautiful valley. Deep, solemn for- 
ests of pine sighed with the wind 
all about us, gave up an ecstatic 
chorus of bird song and filled the 
big yard and every room in the 
spacious house with a very spicy, 
intoxicating fragrance. A little riv- 
er wound like a thread of quicksil- 
ver along the valley. The house 
was banked in roses, flags, poppies 
and vines. Romantic, quaintly 
wandering footpaths invited one to 
lovers' bowers and low, rustic 
benches, whoso cool, lovely solitude 
at every step made one think of 
phrases from Keats and Shelley. 

Life at Krasnova was a dream of 
vegetating ease and relaxation. 

"You musn't think while you're 
here you must simply grow like a 
weed," said my hostess upon my ar- 
rival. 

And so I splashed in the little 
stream early in the morning, had 
my breakfast served to me stretched 
out in a veranda chair in languor- 
ous ease, rode a great Arab horse 
through the forest or played a lazy 
game of tennis. I wandered afield 
with my kodak; I pored over Rus- 
sian novels lying prone on Oriental 
rugs spread in the shade over 
fragrant cushions of pine needles. 
Often I simply dozed away, fanned 
by the cool, resinous winds into 
the happy land of dolce far niente. 

There was nothing else to do. A 



little colony of peasants hid some- 

where in a little hollow and mys- 
teriously did all the work. For the 
rest, one had hut to roam, hunt, 

ride, sleep, bathe, read, or do or 

he anything one chose. Any exhi- 
bition of city-bred worry or un- 
seemly energy, or any mention of 
the words of duty or must was ser- 
iously frowned upon. 

We had the ozone of Switzerland, 
the primeval wildness of Siberia, 
domestic comforts no German hotel 
could match, and the famed abund- 
ance and oddly savory dishes of the 
Russian table. There were no 
trains or motor cars, no maps or 
time tables to study, no peremp- 
tory lackeys, no formal dressing, no 
fancy frocks to wear, no bills to 
foot. 

It was all a happy combination of 
western European speech, manners 
and clothes being artfully com- 
mingled with the delicious Mor- 
phcan philosophy of the Orient. 
And I believed then, as I write now, 
that the Russians are yet to teach 
the world how to live and enjoy 
life, and in nothing more than in 
the serene and delicate art of re- 
laxing after a winter of social or of- 
fice strain. 

My host was a scientist of Euro- 
pean reputation; my hostess was 
the daughter of one of Russia's 
greatest men of letters; she had 
studied painting in all the famous 
schools of Europe and had beauti- 
fied her two homes with exquisite 
canvases. They and their pretty 
little daughter and handsome son 
spoke the four leading languages of 
Europe as well as their own, had 
spent much of their lives in foreign 
capitals and, in fact, were German 
in learning, French in their man- 
ners and tastes and English in their 
sports and amusements. In their 
warm, quick sympathy, however, in 
their royal but natural and un- 
conscious hospitality, their facile, 
positively uncanny intellectual agil- 
ity and in their astoundingly un- 
conventional doctrines about the 
puzzles of human life they were em- 
inently and truly Russian. 

We discussed everything. Wheth- 
er floating idly down the lily bor- 
dered, shimmering Kuakesha or 
strolling in the silent, dim cathed- 
ral quiet of the great forest, we 
wore always concerned with the 
compelling problems of the uni- 
verse. In these all day talks they 
generally spoke their own tongue, 
I mine; for we were thinking 
aloud. 

"Love is love, whether it altera- 
tion finds or not," they argued. 
"Love is everything. When love is 
gone, everything is gone." 

"Anglo-Saxon life," they assured 
me, "is steeped in hypocrisy and 
civilized out of an appreciation of 

(Continued on Page 11) 



Logic of the Loaded 

"Who goes there?" the sentry clial- 

"Lord Roberts," answered the tip- 
sy recruit 

Again the sentry put the question 
and received a like answer, where- 
upon he knocked the offender 
down. When the latter came to, 
the sergeant was bending over him. 
"Sir lure!" said the sergeant, "why 
didn't you answer right when the 
Sentry challenged you?" 

"Holy St. Patrick!" replied the 
recruit; "if he'd do that to Lord 
Roberts, what would lie do to plain 
Mike Flannigan?" 

# * *- * # 

The music had ceased the dancing 
was over. 

"I hope you've enjoyed it to- 
night," said her lover. 

"Oh, charming! Delightful!" she 
answered him sweetly; 

" 'Twas the time of my life! I'm 
exhausted completely!" 



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Store 7, Cor. Powell and Sutter Streets 



THE WASP 




Extensive preparations are being 
made by the Press Club to observe 
their day at the exposition, May. 1, 
which is set down on the calender 
of events as "Press Club Day." Wal- 
demar do Bille, chairman of the 
press and exposition committees 
which have the festivities in hand, 
this week sent invitations broad- 
cast to press clubs in every part of 
the world inviting the ; 'membcrs 
to the Exposition to share in the 
Press Club Day celebration. 

De Bille expects that hundreds of 
newspaper men will be guests of the 
club on this day. Elaborate ar- 
rangement are being made to pro- 
vide a program of festivities com- 
mensurate with the importance of 
the occasion. 

It is probable that the mammoth 
pageant which will be presented at 
the Municipal Auditorium April' 17 
for the Press Club Annual show 
will be produced on this occasion. 

Prom Boston 150 newspaper men 
are expected at the Exposition and 
will be guests of the local scribes. 

Arthur Bennett, who went East 
to procure costumes and accessories 
for the April Show, has returned 
after buying several thousand dol- 
lars worth of costumes and equip- 
ment from the New York Hippo- 
drome. 



Sandy McNaughton's handball 
trophies are not to be contested by 
Olympic Club athletes. It had been 
reported that McNaughton after 
having won a tournament in the 
Olympic Club handball courts 
through long and tedious training, 
might lose his laurels through a 
contest by some of the members 
who said he had played in the 
wrong class. But those who talk- 
ed of the contest later told Sandy 
that they were only jesting and 
were as pleased as he over his vic- 
tory. 

* * * * 

An interesting lecture on "Jour- 
neyings Through Europe" was de- 
livered before the members of the 
Papyrus Club by Mrs. Florence 
Richmond, the president on Thurs- 
day evening in the clubrooms, 420 

Si Telephone Douglas 5712 {? 

4 * 

| Jackson & Merwin § 

£ EXCLUSIVE « 



& SZcoommodat/ons for 9P/en a> 

I 78 GEARY STREET f 

,§ San Francisco t* 

9 °S» 5 3»^» 3 3* 5 3*53»«3»as»538a38*««!j8S 



Sutter street. Mrs. Edward Cole- 
man, chairman of the section, had 
charge of the evening's program. 

* * * # 

The Argonaut Club's first large 
social affair of the season, a ball 
held last Saturday evening at the 
Hotel St. Francis, proved a brilliant 
success. Members of the club and 
their guests reveled in a whirl of 
the dance and all were unanimous 
in declaring the function the most 
elaborate ever had. 

The dance was preceded by a 
vaudeville show, in which Presif 
dent Liebman of the club played a 
prominent role, much to the amuse- 
ment of the audience. 

* x * * 

Officials of San Francisco and of 
the Exposition were entertained as 
guests of the Corona Club Thurs- 
day during the celebration of San 
Francisco and Exposition Day. 

Mrs. Clive A. Brown delivered an 
interesting talk on San Francisco 
and Mrs. Charles S. Lewis spoke on 
the celebration. Stereopticon views 
illustrated both addresses. 

Arrangements are under way for a 
"colonial luncheon" Thursday, Feb- 
ruary 25 at the clubrooms, 536 Sut- 
ter street, to be followed by a card 
party. Members and their guests 
are to appear in colonial costume. 

* # * # 

The realm of youth was portray- 
ed by a clever program presented 
by the California Club Tuesday af- 
ternoon. Humorous stories were re- 
lated by Al C. Joy of the Press Club 
and Mrs. D. E. F. Easton, manager 
of the Children's Theatre, spoke on 
"Drama for Children." Garnet 
Holme, producer for the theatre, de- 
livered an address on "Children as 
Critics." 

A group of children's song were 
sung by Mrs. L. Foster Young, well- 
known soprano soloist. 

* * * -X- 

Members of the Philomath Club 
in large nunmbers attended the 
annual breakfast which took place 
Monday at Century Hall, Sutter 
and Gough streets. The affair was 
for members only. 

* # -X- -X 

A lesson on the modern methods 
of milling flour was had by the 
members of the home economics 
section of the To Ivalon Club Wed- 
nesday when they were escorted 
through the plant of the Globe 
Grain and Milling Company at 
Chestnut and Montgomery Streets. 
Recently the section visited a large 
cotton mill in Oakland and the 
trip proved so edifying that the 
members decided to make a scries 
of such tours to factories and mills 
of the city and vicinity. 

* -X- -X- * 

Remember Him? 

Lieut. Gen. Sir George Bryan Mill- 
man, who served against the Indian 
mutiny and was with the relief of 
Lucklow, is dead. He was an officer 
of the Fifth Fusilliers for many 
years, and from 1870 to 1909 he was 
in charge of the Tower of London. 



THE WOMAN BEAUTIFUL 




Auction Bridge 

Some of the deals recently played 
in the various duplicate auction 
tournaments throughout the coun- 
try have given rise to discussion as 
to whether it is the bidding or the 
play that loses the more points, as 
there are a number of hands in ev- 
ery game which show large losses. 
This brings up the question, what 
is the most common fault in play? 
And the answer seems to be that it 
is in the opening lead. 

In spite of all the teachers and 
text books it must be acknowledg- 
ed that not one player in fifty, take 
them as they come, knows the ele- 
mentary leads, returns and second 
hand plays, while such things as 
unblocking and echoes are as little 
understood as Esperanto. 

Very few among the average run 
of players, such as one meets at any 
of the big charity games, for in- 
stance, have the slightest idea of 
the difference ibetween the (leads 
against a trump and against no- 
trumpers, and still fewer have learn- 
ed the difference in the manner of 
opening suits that are backed up 
by reentry cards and those which 
will have to bring themselves in. 

Looking at nothing but the indiv- 
idual suit and its possiblities, there 
seem to be three openings which are 
fundamentally bad and are con- 
stant sources of loss. 

They may be roughly classed: 

1. Leads that give the declarer the 
advantage of position in a certain 
suit. 

2. Leads that stand to lose more 
than they stand to win in the suit 
itself. 

3. Leads that guess at the suit, 
when guessing is quite unnecessary. 

The first is probably the most 
expensive, and many a game has 
been lost by leading a certain suit 
or card up to the declarer, enabling 
him to win just the trick that was 
essential to success.. Such leads are 
playing the opponent's game. The 
opportunity for this error arises 
most frequently when a suit has 
been shown and the opponents 
have gone to no trumps in spite of 
it. 

This amounts to a declaration 
that the no trumper has the suit 
stopped, but it may be that it is 
stopped only if it is led. If there is 
nothing in the hand of the player 
with the opening lead that might 
prevent the declarer from stopping 
the suit it may be just as well to 
lead the suit and get the stopper 
out of the way. That is what your 



Saturday, February 13, 1915 

object in showing the suit: to get 
aq; si ^Biij, -op oi; nox sj[sra .rau^.iBd 
you to lead it and clear it up at 
once. 

But if the player to the left of the 
declarer has any card that will stop 
that stopper it is folly to lead the 
suit, because it simply makes the 
stopper a certainty, and all guards 
to it may be thrown away. 

If the suit which the declarer 
seems to have stopped is the lead- 
er's suit there is even more reason 
for not opening it, unless the sop- 
per is better than anything the 
leader holds, and must win a trick 
in any case. 



A Superscription 

Look in my face; my name is Might- 
have-been; 
I am also called No-more, Too-late, 

Farewell; 
Unto thine ear I hold the dead sea 

shell 
Cast up thy Life's foam fretted feet 

between; 
Unto thine eyes the glass where 

that is seen 
Which had life's form and Love's, 

but by my spell 
Is now a shaken shadow intolerable 
Of ultimate things unuttered the 

frail screen. 
Mark me, how still I am! But 

should there dart 
One moment through thy soul the 

soft suprise 
Of that winged peace which lulls 

the breath of sighs- 
Then shalt thou see me smile, and 

turn apart 
Thy visage to mine ambush at thy 

heart, 
Sleepless with cold commemorative 

eyes. 



P. V. Matraia, 
President 



Julius Eppstein 
Secretary 



Jxrt 3>loral Company 

iDCorporatcd 

HOTEL ST. FRANCIS 

225 POWELL ST., SAN FRANCISCO 

Tel. Kearny 3524 and Suiter 1372 




WEAR THE 
HEW PATENT 

Invisible Bifocals 

and avoid annoyance and incon- y 
venience in changing- glasses when 
you wish to see far or near, as the 
case may be. Both the reading and 
distance corrections are combined. 

Mayerle's Glasses 

are highly recommended for read- 
ing, working or to see at a dis- 
tance, weak eyes, poor sight, 
strained, tired, itchy, watery, in- 
flamed, gluey eyes, floating spots, 
crusty or granulated eyelids, 
cross eyes, astigmatism, headache, 
dizziness, children's eyes and com- 
plicated cases of eye defects. Two 
gold medals and diploma of honor 
awarded at California Industrial 
Exposition, also at Mechanics' 
Fair, October, 1913, to 

GEORGE MAYERLE 

Graduate German Expert Optician 

Established 20 Years 
960 Market St., San Francisco 

Opposite the Empress Theatre 

Mayerle Eyewater at Druggists' 

50c; by mail 65c 



. 



Saturday, February 13, 1915 



THE WASP 



9 




By John C. Observer. 



"Hicky" for a Jitney 

The jitney bus owners have been 
heard. They are crowing over their 
profits of $1.50 an hour and over. 

The United Railroads have had 
their say. They are bemoaning the 
loss of thousands of nickels a day. 

Something even has been said by 
Ihe Supervisors, though they are 
still on the fence. 

It would seem that all of the in- 
terested parties have been heard 
from. But such is not the case. 
There are others vitally concerned 
in the welfare of the new five-cent 
busses who are saying nothing. 
They are simply resting on their 
oars, smiling the smiles of the con- 
tented, too satisfied for utterance. 

These arc the accident insurance 
agents. They are glad that the jit- 
ney has come. Their only hope is 
that it is here to stay. 

For, while the new nickel vehic- 
les have been responsible for sur- 
prisingly few accidents so far, their 
number in the downtown district, 
and especially along Market street, 
is throwing fright into the hearts 
of all pedestrians. 

Their progress through Market 
street in little groups has been lik- 
ened to schools of fish swimming 
down a river. Wherever and when- 
ever the pedestrian crosses Market 
street, he finds himself dodging jit- 
neys. By the time he reaches the 
opposite side of the street, his heart 
is in his mouth. He thanks his 
lucky stars that he has escaped in- 
tact. 
Such fears are the stock and trade 

of the accident insurance man and 

the number of policies written since 
jthc busos first made their appear- 
ance is said to have made the jit- 
faeys staunch friends of the insur- 
ance brokers. "On with the jitneys," 

sit id an insurance man this week, 

'we're with them heart and soul." 



Passing of "Billy" Hynes 

"Billy" Hynes is dead. 

The news threw San Francisco in- 
to grief last Saturday. Pew of the 
popular public administrator's 
best friends even knew of his illness 
His demise was a shock to all and 
wherever men congregated high tri- 
bute was paid to the departed of- 
ficial. 

But as San Franciscans read eu- 
ogics of the deceased, they wonder 
?d, for the first time, why M. J. 
ftynes had been known only as 
'Billy" Hynes, the nickname follow- 
ng him into public office and pri- 



vate life. In fact there were few 
who knew that his given name was 
Michael, so generally was lie known 
as "Billy." 

The sobriquet came as the result 
of Hynes' unusual abilities as an 
entertainer, talents that made him 
a favorite at political rallies and 
private functions. 

For as one of his best friends said 
soon after his death, "Billy Hynes 
simply sung himself into office." 

Years ago, at a charity minstrel 
show Hynes took his place as an 
end man and his quick wit, smart 
repartee, and natural talent as a 
comedian made him the hit of the 
show. 

Time and again during the even- 
ing, as the interlocutor opened the 
way for a good piece of mirth, he 
made a facetious statement and 
winking at Hynes in a corner of the 
stage, asked, "Don't you think so 
Billy?" 

This was "Billy's" cue to blossom 
forth in a flurry of mirth. He 
threw his audience into paroxysms 
of laughter. After the affair ended, 
"Billy" was greeted with cheers. 

Years passed after that affair, 
now perhaps a quarter of a century 
back, but as "Billy" he continued 
to be known and as "Billy" Hynes, 
he was elected to public office again 
and again. 

At political rallies, it was a com- 
mon thing for the cry to come from 
the galleries, "Cut out the talk an' 
give us 'Billy' Hynes." 

And "Billy" never disappointed. 
Never known to make a polit- 
ical speech, he responded always 
with bright monologues of the ex- 
periences of "my friend Clancy" and 
concluded with his inimitable 
laughing song. 



Terpischore Conquers 
No more will Edward Rainey, the 
astute private secretary of Mayor 
Holph, worship at the shrine of Ter- 
psichore, He has laid his right 
hand aloft, exclaiming loudly, "nev- 
er again." 

Early last week Rainey limped in- 
to the mayor's office and painfully 
fell into his big swivel chair. He 
arose soon afterwards with a gri- 
mace of pain over his face and limp- 
ed slowly from his office through 
the corridors of the City Hall, pass- 
ing officials and politicians. 

Their curiosity aroused, Rainey 
was plied with questions. Everyone 
wanted to know what had happen- 
ed. 

"Did some job seeker pull your 
leg, Ed?" asked one curious friend. 
"Perhaps you hurt yourself get- 
ting out of a jitney," suggested an- 
other. 

But Rainey was silent and nary 
a question did he answer. So the 
curious began to speculate. The 
mystery of Rainey's limp spread 
through officialdom and became a 
piece de resistance with those who 
run the machinery of the city gov- 
ernment. 

The newpapers had recorded no 
accident to the Mayor's secretary, 
they said. They knew that Rain- 
ey's hobby is hiking with the Sier- 
ra Club over Tamalpias slopes but 
hiking in the rain was out of the 
question. 

So the mystery continued for days 
until someone on the inside let the 
secret out. The Mayor's secretary 
was injured doing a "dip" at the Ce- 
lebrities' Ball. Clothed with official 
dignity and representing the city 
at that function, Rainey was revel- 
ing in the joys of the "three step" 



when lie twisted a tendon in his 
limb. 

"On with the dance, but I'm 
through for good," he told a friend 
as he limped out of the ballroom. 
» # * * 

"Peter B. Kyne" a Model 
"We want black eats painted over 
the walls of the room; I'll bring 
Peter B. Kyne down to you for a 
model," said a prominent member 
of the Press Club the other day to 
an interior decorator, who had been 
engaged to beautify the Club's re- 
ception room in the Press Building 
on the Exposition grounds. The 
room is to be furnished in Bohem- 
ian style. 

With those directions, the Press 
Club official departed, leaving the 
artist to wonder in amazement. 
"Bring Peter. B. Kyne down with 
you for a model." he kept repeat- 
ing to himself time and again. "I'm 
sure Peter B. Kyne cannot be a 
cat," he declared aloud. 

For somewhere in his mind, the 
decorator had a fixed idea that the 
name of Kyne was associated with 
literature. If it was, the decorator 
could not understand why that in- 
dividual should pose as a feline. 
He was hopelessly perplexed. 

The decorator called his wife. He 
placed the circumstances before her. 
She went direct to her bookcase 
and drew out a bundle of old mag- 
azines. Quickly she searched 
through them, until there appeared 
the name of Kyne as author of a 
short story. 

"By Peter B. Kyne" she called to 
her husband, " I knew he was an 
author." 

'Then how can he pose as a cat?" 
shouted back the husband. 

So they called the Press Club on 
the telephone and asked for Frank 
Morse, editor of The Scoup; the 
Press Club journal. 

"Tell me quick," demanded the 
excited artist, "Is Peter B. Kyne a 
writer and if he is how can he be a 
model for a cat?' 

Morse thought long and then the 
humor of the situation threw him 
into convultions of laughter. "Peter 
B. Kyne is a writer," he answered 
but our black cat— the mascot of 
the club— is named after him, see?" 




The Things You Hear 

"Arc you coming to the Waller- 
by reception tonight?" 

"No. The Twobbles will be there, 
so I declined my invitation." 

"Why do you object to the pres- 
ence of the Twobbles?" 

"I don't object to their presence 
particularly, but |I [have already 
heard them tell the story of their 
escape from Berlin ten or twelve 
times, and I don't feel equal to an- 
other recital." 

* * * # * 

Bifkins— I see you carry a silver 
watch. I thought you had a gold 
one. 

Hardup— I did, but icircum- 
stanses alter cases. 

# * * * * 

Sillicus— Yes, I'm just crazy to get 
married. 

Cynicus— Well, I won't contradict 
you, my boy. 



10 



THE WASP 



Saturday, February 13, 1915 




Constancy 
O love, 1 do not love thee less at 
dawn : 

Day, coming like a spy, 
Beholds me touch thy hand; 
Darkness enfolds what daylight 

doth descry; 
Dost thou not understand? 
Oh! do not tremble like a startled 

fawn. 
Come lift thy head and no more sit 

and grieve: 
The spying sun hath fled, 
And twilight holds us fast. 
A thousand kisses ache to press thy 

head 
Wow that the day is past, 
Yet, love, I do not love thee more 
at eve! 



The Ladies' Hearts 

The sight of two magnificent sets 
of long red whiskers at the junc- 
tion of Powell and Market streets 
the other afternoon at 2:15, bound 
north,, attracted much attention. 
Not a white horse was in the neigh- 
borhood, but the driver of a white 
automobile looked conscious as 
gazes were turned from the whis- 
kers to him, and a man who was a 
passenger on a southbound omni- 
bus ventured to remark that not in 
twenty years had the streets of San 
Francisco abounded in beards as 
they do just now. Inquiry at the 
hotels revealed the cause. 

The whiskers, if they were real, as 
they appeared to be, were as near 
alike, speaking by sets, as if they 
belonged to twins. If physiognom- 
ies do not go for naught, the men 
immediately behind and below 
them were either Frenchmen or Bel- 
gians. That surmise led to the in- 
quiry which showed that bearded 
men had been flocking to San Fran- 
cisco for several months, coming 
mainly from Europe. 

In the lobbies of some of the com- 
mercial hotels recently, what space 
was not taken up by smoke was de- 
voted to whiskers. A walk up 
Powell showed that thoroughfare 
at certain hours punctured with 
whiskered individuals, for whom 
the beardless seemed to possess 
equal interest with that they them- 
selves aroused. In the fashionable 
hotels whiskers of various varieties 
were in evidence, and a walk along 
Market developed an average of 
more than one set of ambrosial face 
trimmings to every block. A bar- 
ber said that whisker-triniming had 
become a lost art in his shop until 
a few weeks ago. 



Napoleon III 

Following is a pen portrait of 
Napoleon III from the unpublished 
diaries of John Hay. 

"Short and stocky, he moves with 
a queer, sidelong gait, like a gouty 
crab; a man so wooden-looking 
that you would expect his voice 
to come out rasping like a 
watchman's rattle A complexion 
like crude tallow marked for Death, 
whenever Death wants him — to be 
taken some time in half an hour, 
or left, neglected by the Skeleton 
King, for years, perhaps, if properly 
coddled. The mustache and im- 
perial which the world knows, but 
ragged and bristly, concealing the 
mouth entirely, is moving a little 
nervously as the lips twitch. Eyes 
sleepily watchful— furtive, stealthy, 
rather ignoble, like servants look- 
ing out of dirty windows and say- 
ing 'nobody at home,' and lying as 
they say it. And withal a wonder- 
ful phlegm. He stands there as 
still and impassive as if carved in 
oak for a ships forehead. He looks 
not unlike one of those rude, inart- 
istic statues. His legs are too short, 
his body too long. He never looks 
well but on a throne or on a horse, 
as kings ought." 

Money for the Blood 

Early in the great Scontroversy 
both England and Germany an- 
nounced that the issue would 
would be determined solely by the 
be determined solely by the 
question of money, men and sup- 
now comes the news that the house 
of Morgan has arranged a loan of 
$12,000,000 to Russia. It is the for- 
runner of similar loans from many 
bankers. At last the nations are 
wearing out their resources. 

If the average man will just sit 
back and think a bit, he will appre- 
ciate what this means. It means, 
briefly, that the question of life and 
death for millions lies in the hands 
of the relatively few men in the 
world who control the cash. If 
providing this cash means that war 
will go on, refusing to provide the 
cash also means that war must 
stop. If one man in the world had 
all the cash in the world, and by 
lending or withholding it he could 
continue or stop the frightful 
slaughter, and if you who read this 
were that one man what would you 
do? 



A Man Not Necessary 

At the call of mobilization in Par- 
is, hurried marriages were legion 
and the government suspended the 
formalities in favor of men called to 
the colors, thousands of whom wish- 
ed to regularize their domestic sit- 
uations so that the women with 
whom they had been living for 
years but whom they had never 
married because of family, religion, 
money considerations and the thou- 
sand reasons which prevent or de- 
lay marrieges among poor French 
people, might have the franc and 
a quarter a day support from the 
government during the war. 

Most business houses and employ- 
ers in general respected the ancient 
French institution of irregular fam- 
ilies and let their workmen's mis- 
tresses and children have the same 
proportion of salaries and wages 
as was allowed to really married 
couples. But lately there have been 
cases of misunderstanding of the ex- 
tent to which the complicated rules 
of getting married had been sus- 
pended on account of the war. 

A midnette called the other day 
at the marriage office in the city 
hall of her burough and asked 
whether it was true that the formal- 
ities were suspended. The chief 
clerk said it was true. "Very well, 
then," she said, simply, "I think 
we'll get married then. Here are 
our papers. They are up to date 
and all stamped properly." 

"But, mademoiselle," exclaimed 
the clerk, "just who is 'we'?" 

"My fiance and myself, of course." 

"But where is he?" 

"Why he's fighting, of course." 

"You mean to say he's not here?" 

"Of course." 

"But you can't get married with- 
out the man here you know." 

"Oh, can't you? I though the 
formalities had been suspended." 
And mademoiselle had to go home 
and write her man at the front he 
must try very hard to get three 
days off and come to Paris and get 
married. 



Ambition to be Fast 

Cassimir S. Mankowski, whose am- 
bition it is to own the first boat 
that will race through the water at 
the rate of a mile a minute, has ac- 
cepted plans for a craft to be built 
from designs by Frederick Chase 
with which he expects to accom- 
plish the feat. The craft is to be 26 
feet in length, six feet shorter than 
the Ankle Deep, which was burned 
at Buffalo last season. It will be 
fitted with two 250-horse power en- 
gines, giving the craft 200 more 
horse power than his former craft, 
sufficient, the designers believe, to 
give the desired speed for a full 
hour's run at a mile a minute. The 
new craft is to be named the Ankle 
Deep Too. 




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no other has, and ii 
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mend Gouraud's Cream' as the least harmful of all the 
Skin preparations." 




For Sale by All Druggists and Fancy 
Goods Dealers. 

GOURAUD'S ORIENTAL TOILET 
POWDER 

For infants and adults. Exquisitely 
perfumed. Relieves Skin Irritations, cures 
Sunburn and renders an excellent complex- 
ion. Price, 25 cents, by mail. 

GOURAUD'S POUDRE SUBTILE 
Removes Superfluous Hair. Price 91, by 

Mail. 

FERD. T. HOPKINS, Prop., 37 Great 

Jones St., New York Oity. 



Confident— Does your wife agree 
with you? 

The Count^-Not very well. I 
think she must be too rich for my 
blood. 



A Piano Clearance of 
Unusual Importance at 

Kohler & Chase 



Unusual because of the high 
quality of the Pianos, Player 
Pianos and Baby Grands. Unusual 
because of the extremely low 
prices. Unusual because of the 
large assortment and wide varie- 
ty- 

Practically every well-known 
make is included — Knabes, Stein- 
ways, Fischers, Emersons, Kohler 
& Chase, Weber and scores of oth- 
ers. 

Used Upright Pianos now as 
low as $85, Player Pianos as low 
as $195, Baby Grands $225, etc. 

Convenient terms if desired. 

All in all the most important 
sale we've conducted in a num- 
ber of years. It will pay you to 
investigate. 



26 O'Farrell Street 

Oakland Store 473 12th Street 

Bacon Block 

Tickets for all concerts always on 

sale here. 



Saturday, February 13, 1915 



THE wasp 



Ins and Outs of the Social World 

(Continued from page 5) 



bave i n the brides of the harem 

all of their lives. 

Plump little Miss Marion Stoval, 
whose features an' not unlike those 

of our Bisters Of the far east, was 

one "i the most fetching maids in 

tl tstun i an Oriental Princess. 

It was a snakelike gown of green 
chiffon and crystals, with a jacket 
of brilliant purple embroidered in 
green and gold. Her hair was 
bound close to her head with a 
bandeau of pearls and she wore 
green stockings with gold slippers. 
Miss Helen Wright. Miss Ola Wil- 
Icts. Miss Julia Van Fleet and nu- 

POLICE TO REGULATE EM- 
PLOYMENT BUREAUS 

When the Police Commission of 
San Francisco found it necessary to 
step in and issue a strong word of 
warning to employment bureaus, 
threatening them with drastic regu- 
lation if they did not cease their 
plundering of the unemployed, it 
can be taken for granted that con- 
ditions in that line of business are 
extremely bad. Pending an investi- 
gation of the bureaus, a strict or- 
der went out from headquarters 
that no more licenses were to be is- 
sued. 

The opportunity for gouging 
those who came to them seeking po- 
sitions proved too much for the 
majority of the unemployed bureau 
operators to resist, and it soon be- 
came the universal habit to charge 
all the traffic would bear. Pees 
amounting to over thirty per cent 
were charged in some eases. Twenty- 
five per cent is the usual thing with 
most of these grasping rascals, 
where, in all honesty and decency, 
ten per cent should be the limit. 

The average employer is unaware 
of the extent of this obnoxious prac- 
tice, for in their hiring of help from 
the agencies, no echo of the ques- 
tionable methods in vogue reach 
their ears. Consequently they have 
little heeded the occasional protest 
wrung from some victim who had 
the temerity to cry out in their 
presence against the employment 
robber. 

Now that free employment bu- 
reaus have been established by the 
State in an effort to reliev this 
condition, the question has arisen 
whether or not the bureaus should 
be under the control of one man, 
and that man identified with a lab- 
or union, or placed under the juris- 
diction of one of the Commissions. 

If the former plan is adopted it 
dooms from the beginning any free 
employment bureau. When a man 
is hired there are always two parties 
to the transaction; the employer 
and employee. The labor unions 
are the closest of corporations and 
see only one side of all questions. 
No employer would get a fair deal 
and consequently would not pat- 
ronize the free bureaus. And with- 



meroua others of the fair maid- 
were visions of beauty in loose 
trousers of thin ehiffon, while the 

men were Stunning mandarins. 

shah- and ancient Bamarii. 

Scores ol elaborate dinners were 
given prior to the affair, the most 
attractive probably being that giv- 
en by Miss Ruth Perkins at her 
home on Jackson street. The table 
resembled a Japanese garden and 

great loads Of dirt were brought in 

and arranged by a Japanese artist 
into a tea garden with picturesque 

bridges, pools, streams with gold- 
fish swimming about, and in the 
background a temple of Buddha. 



out anybody to hire the unem- 
ployed, the bureaus could do no 
business. 

The employer must receive equal 
consideration with the employee, a 
condition that is possible only if 
the bureaus are under the control 
of a disinterested commission, com- 
posed of representatives of both 
sides. 

This same problem has been met 
and solved in Germany. Committees 
were placed in charge of all free 
labor bureaus. The trade union- 
ists commenced by bitterly oppos- 
ing the public employment bu- 
reaus. Once they realized their real 
value they started to make use of 
them, and in a short time handed 
over their own employment bu- 
reaus to the public institutions. 
The same thing will happen in Cal- 
ifornia if the agencies arc placed un- 
der the supervision of a commission. 



The Worth of Love 

Love, seed, and flower of all eternal 
tilings, 
Thou rose of heaven that blos- 
soms on the earth 
And makes a garden whercso'cr it 
springs, 
Mysterious love, what praise can 
give thee worth? 
For men thou art the glamour hid 
in gold, 
The staff in power, the hope in 
honor lain; 
Without thee Princes shiver; and 
the old, 
Who have not thee, their treas 
ures clutch in vain. 
Thou hast more forms than the 
grey ocean knows: 
Thou art a lark flown skyward 
ere the day, 
Thou art a cloud where through the 
sunset glows, 
The silent moon on his unbodied 
way ; 
Thou art a forest singing in the 
wind, 
A well-spring risen from unwatc- 
cred earth , 
Thou art a flaming heath with 
storm behind: 
Song, fountain, fire— what praise 
can give thee worth? 



LOTUS ISLES OF RUSSIA 
(Continued from Page 7) 

the great elemental, cruel, but beau- 
tiful meaning of life. The most im- 
portant thing in life is goodness, 
and the next is frankness and sin- 
cerity. The greatest calamity is to 
be torn with more ideals than 
strength of will." 

After the II o'clock oozhen we went 
out on the wide veranda facing the 
stygian forest with our coffee and 
cigars. A swollen yellow moon 
struggled upward and became im- 
paled on the sharp black points of 
the pines. .Mother and daughter 
sat down at the grand piano, and 
the moody, passionate modulations 
of a Beethoven sonata drifted out 
to where we sat. Our talk ceased. 
Fatigued by the heat of the day, 
fed and happy, we mused, lulled 
by the music, hypnotized by the 
theatrical beauty of the moonlit 
nocturnal landscape 

One day we were the guests of 
a poor, patriarchal peasant at his 
thatched hut in the nearest selo 
whither we galloped in a trojka. 
Later, a neighboring estate gave us 
a big birthday dinner. Some morn- 
ings we made hay with the peas- 
ants in the field. Again and again 
I visited the warped, mossy, flour- 
powdered old mill up the valley. 
How I loved to meditate over its 
unhurried, picturesque activity. No 
wonder a great Russian poet found 
here his joy and inspiration! 

Then the sweet voiced tea-bell 
clanked appetizingly on the other 
side of the hill. I saw the gentle 
face of old Pavia Nicholievna by 
the steam plumed samover; I saw 
the mound of brown krangycl, stuf- 
fed with nuts and glistening with 
sugar and daintily arranged on the 
crimson embroidered table linen 
under the trees; I saw gaping bowls 
of snowy prostakvasha curds and 
tall pitchers of golden cream— and 
I rose up, clapped my notebook to, 
slung my kodak into place, and 
was soon eagerly swinging my 
heavy boots through the tides of 
grass along the path that snakes 
up over the meadow and dodges in 
among the pines. 



The Secret of Beauty FREE 
A masterpiece in color by C. Allen 
Gilbert, the well known artist. 

We will be glad to send to all users of 
Gourand'B Oriental Cream a copy of Mr. 
Gilbert's beautiful painting, entitled 
"The Secret of Beauty," in panel form, 
11x22 inches. It is a splendid reproduc- 
tion, on highly coated paper, of one of 
the girl's figures Mr. Gilbert is noted 
for, and is not marred by any printed 
matter which would prevent framing. 
Send 10c in stamps to cover wrapping 
and postage. We are confident you will 
be highly pleased with the picture and 
calendar and find it a valued addition to 
your library or den. 

FERD. T. HOPKINS & SON, Props. 
37 Great Jones Street, New York. 



11 



Best brain work done between ages of 

GO and 70 is a recent claim of 

■dentists 

H this ola mi is true I i should be 

■ d wll ii i he proviso thai vision 

»od nothing binders brain 

moiN turn defective ej eslghl — 

pi - There is no longer 

cuse for anyone not working to 

nil mental ca pad I y now I ns I i he 

rl ni lens called "Caltex one- 

i Bifocal has been perfected, it 

■ r and far seeing with the 

[>alr of glasses and without Mur 

or discomfort, 

W. D. Fennimore 1 i M ) A. R. Fennimore 




m 

181 Post Street 
2508 Mission St. 

1221 Broadway, Oakland 



San Francisco 



i 




ilLTMOl 

NEW YORK 
America's Latest and 
Most Refined and New , 
York's Centermost Hotel 

Only hotel occupying an entire city 

block, Vanderbllt and Madiaon A vs., 

43d and 44th Sts., adjoining Grand 

Central Terminal 

10O0 rooms; o.to with bath— Room rati 
from ?2.fi0 per (Jay. Suites from 2 
to 15 rooms for permaoeiit oceil- 
paney. Large and small ball, linn- 

^quet and dlnjog salons and suites 
l specially arnmjrcd for public 

\ or private inactions 

Custav Bnumann, Pres 
in McE. Bowman 



i I 

t§ Phone Douglas 5370 W 

I M. E. GALLAGHER 1 

a Fancy, Street, Reception and Evening at 

| GOWNS I 

$ WEDDING TROUSSEAUX & 

| ,£■£,£ $ 

S 96-07 Whittell Bldg., 166 Geary St. ^ 

ft San Francisco. 8$ 

S«fe«Pstfetfetfetfe«feSfe«BTtfetBo jg 

I The "Frances" 

I IIAIRDRESSING AND 

5 MANICURING PARLORS, 
f 110 GEARY STREET. 
*£ Purchased and Now Conducted by 

I 9ffrs. Z. Williams 

m Formerly Manager Hair Diessing § 

6 Dept., The Emporium. ^ 



HONOLULU JAPAN CHINA PHILIPPINES 

REACHED VIA "THE SUNSHINE BELT" 

S. S. CHINA (10,200 TONS) 

SAILS SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 20th 

SEND FOR ILLUSTRATED BOOK AND POSTALS 

PHONE 
KEARNY 3620 
364 Flood Bruiting*, San Francisco 



12 



THE WASP 



Saturday, February 13, 1915 



Doug-las 2549 W. H. Jerrett, Prop. 

RECTOR'S 

CABARET DE LUXE 

IT'S DIFPEBEHT 



12 Entertainers— Dancing 
36 Ellis Street. Under Cort Theatre 



| 

t 

y 

! 

I 
I 



AFTER THE THEATER 

For Good Fresh Oysters 

GOTO 

JOHN'S GRILL 

57 Ellis Street 

SPECIALTIES 

Oyster Loaves 

Lobsters — Oysters — Crab 

Stew — Steaks — Chops 

WILPKED J. GIEAKD. Prop 



BkHAU : TAVERN. 



Cor. Eddy and Powell Sts. 
Phone Douglas 4700 

A HIGH-CLASS 
FAMILY CAFE 

Where patronB are constantly surrounded 

by an air of refinement and respectability 

Informal Dansant Every Evening" at 

Nine Except Sunday 

Under the management of 

A. C MORSISON 



Odeon Cafe 

Market and Eddy Sts. 

San Francisco's Leading 
Restaurant 

Vaudeville Evening — 

Concert Afternoons 

A. BECKER, President 
A. J. BECKER, Manager 



J.-B. Pon J. Bergez 0. Lalsnne 

C. Mailhebuau L. Coutard 



Bergez- Frank's 

OLD 

..Poodle Dog.. 

Hotel Co. 

and 

Restaurant 




Music and Entertainment ETery Evening 

416-421 BXJSH STREET 

(Above Kearny) 

SAN FRANOISCO, CAL. 

Exchange Douglas 2411 



PEDERAL CLUB 

32 TURK STREET 
San Francisco's Popular Rendezvous 



Cafe Notes 
The Cliff House was the scene of 
a merry function a week ago, when 
Mr. and Mrs. Melville Schweitzer 
entertained a number of friends at 
a delightful dinner dance. A splen- 
did menu was served and between 
the various courses the guests in- 
dulged in the latest terpsichorean 
novelties. 



More than 80 German refugees 
who fled from the Marshall Islands 
reaching here on their way back to 
the Fatherland, were entertained 
at dinner at the Odeon Cafe last 
Monday night. . The strangers were 
guests of the cafe management and 
enjoyed the affair heartily. 



At Techau's 

After the grand, popular opening 
of the Panama-Pacific Internation- 
al Exposition on Feb. 20th, it will 
be well to remember that the day 
may be rounded out in a fitting 
manner by attending the Dinner 
Dance at Techau Tavern. 

It is planned to make the occa- 
sion the most enjoyable that the 
Tavern has ever seen, which is a 
large order to fill, for this famous 
cafe has a record of many delight- 
ful achievements of a similar char- 
acter. 



Oyster Loaf Well Patronized 
The heavy rains of the past week 
were not enough to keep the usual 
luncheon crowd from the Oyster 
Loaf Buffet on Market street. When 
it is storming outside one apprec- 
iates a comfortable homelike inter- 
ior, where an excellent luncheon 
may be obtained. Noontime the 
Oyster Loaf was a busy place these 
past few days. 



Business Good Says Berger 
What ever the reason for it, trade 
at the Berger store on Market street 
keeps to its high level. Perhaps 
everybody is getting ready to cele- 
brate the opening of the Exposition 
which takes place just a week from 
today. At any rate, Bergers seems 
to be getting business, for it main- 
tains about the most complete line 
of men's furnishings to be found in 
the city. 



Gray hair restored to its natural col- 
or by Alfredum's Egyptian Henna — a 
perfectly harmless dye, and the effect 
is immediate. Tnj most certain and 
satisfactory preparation for the pur- 
pose. Try it. At all druggists. — Advt 



Beethoven in Gotham 
For the first time in six years 
Beethoven's opera "Fidelio," was 
given at the Metropolitan Opera 
House recently. It was under the 
direction of Mr. Hertz. The last per- 
formance of it had been heard there 
under Gustav Mahler in the season 
of 1908-9, when there was only one; 
and the seaon before it had been 
given three times in a production 
newly studied under his direction 
after the manner in which he had 
previously produced it at the Im- 
perial Opera of Vienna, where it 
had been considered to be one of 
his most noteworthy achievements. 
The inclusion of "Fidelio" in the 
season's repertory at the Metropol- 
itan must be set down to the credit 
of the management as a work of 
piety and disinterested idealism. 
For though Beethoven's opera had 
a place in the affections of music- 
lovers all its own and different from 
that of any other lyric drama, it 
has never been what is regarded by 
operatic managers as a "success." It 
was not one in Beethoven's lifetime 
when he himself launched its career, 
and when he labored grievously ov- 
er successive revisions of its score 
for subsequent productions in the 
hope of fitting it to the demands of 
managers and public. There has al- 
ways been needed a certain amount 
of effort to keep it upon the stage. 
And yet the opera represents 
some of the greatest and most 
heartfelt of Beethoven's inspira- 
tion; its greatest moments are 
among the greatest moments in all 
lyric drama. Nothing in all musi- 
cal literature makes a more poig- 
nant appeal to the heart, or pene- 
trates more deeply to the innermost 
springs of human emotion, nor has 
music often been used with a touch 
so unerring in dramatic characteri- 
zation. Its eloquence, at its high- 
est, is supreme, and its beauty is 
not staled by lapse of time or the 
passing of the operatic fashion. 
* -x- * * * 

Villon's Last Poem 

I, Francois Villon, ta'en at last 
To the rude bed where all must 
lie, 
Fain would forget the turbid past, 
And lay me down in peace to die. 
"Would I be shrived?" Ah, can I 
tell? 
My sins but trifles seem to be, 
Not worth the dignity of hell; 

If not, thou ill avails me 
To name them one and all, and yet, 
There be some things which I re- 
gret ! 



<~x~X"X~x~x-x«x~x~x~x~x~x~:« 



for Sportsmen 
Dance Hall 



Buffet 



The After-Dinner Dansants at FRED SOLARI'S GRILL, 

the beautiful appointments of the restaurant, the perfect cui- 
sine and service appeal to the discriminating. 

Large parties of the kind of people, one likes to meet, en- 
joy the nightly dances that commence at 8 o 'clock and continue 
until closing time. Mr. Le Boy and Alice Rinaldo have met 
with tremendous success in their expositions of modern dances. 
They also give free instruction to guests. Last Friday, Pacific 
Parlor No. 10, Native Sons of the Golden West, enjoyed a din- 
ner-dance at Fred Solari's, which was voted one of the jolliest 
affairs of the season. 




The Mark of the Candy of Character 



"Small Blacks' 



A COFFEE CONFECTION A 

Y 

Half As Sweet As Other Candy y 

More Than Twice As Good A 
10c, 50c and $1 PACKAGES | 

The Golden Pheasant X 

32-36 GEARY STREET .$ 



I 

I 

V 

1* 
x 

! 

I 

I 
•xkK"X*x~x**X"X"X~X"X~x~x~x 



? 




felwaw 



BOTEL AND RESTAURANT 
64 - 66 Ellis Street 



Our Cooking Will Meet Tour Taste. Our 
Pricea Will Pleaae You. 



The New 

POODLE DOG 




HOTEL & RESTAURANT 

WILL REMAIN AT CORNER 

POLK and POST 

SAN FRANCISCO 
Telephones: Franklin 2960; Home C 6705 



Pearl Oyster House 

Phone Douglas 4768 

FISH AND SHELLFISH 

In All Its Varieties 

Fine-St. Entrance, California Market 



Phone China 571 

ShanghaiLow 

Chop Suey and Noodles 

Furnishes the Very Best Chop 

Suey and Oriental Dishes in the 
Finest Home like Dining Boom in 
the City. 

First Class Service, Special Booms 
for Ladies 

532 GRANT AVENUE 

Between California and Fine Sts. 



Saturday, February 13, 1915 



SO QL; : .|F 




The Ladies Who Play 
A definite idea of the calibre of 
California's women golfers should 
be afforded at the Exposition tour- 
nament by the presence of .Miss 
.Mai inn Hollins, the champion play 
el- of New York. She is quite first 
class and it will be interesting to 
compare .Miss Edith Cheseborough, 
Mrs. Pomer and the other leading 
ladies of the links with tli is visitor 
of international reputation. There 
was, at one time a hope that some 
of the best British women players 
would be here. But most of them 
are nursing and the rest are knit- 
ting. 

# # # * 

Muchly Advertised 
The Eastern polo players, who 
have not already arrived on the 
coast, will come from the East in a 
Special train. It will start from 
New York and the Philadelphia 
and Boston contingent are to join 
en route. The Eastern sporting ed- 
itors are beginning to devote large 
sections of space to the forthcoming 
world's games and polo with it's 
| gorgeous trimmings is naturally 
coming in for more than its fair 
share of attention. One writer 
' claims that it is not unlikely Cali- 
| foinia may displace the Riviera, as 
' the winter pleasure resort of wealth 
and fashion. It is certain that on 
the matter of facilities for sport this 
state can easily surpass the south of 
France and in regard to beauty it is 
about an even thing. At least so 
it seems to a Philistine sporting ed- 
I itor. 

# * * # 

A Great Sprinter 
George Parker, one of the two 
i greatest sprinters in the world, 
i many think he ranks first in soli- 

Itary splendor, is threatening to go 
cast on business this year instead 
of staying and helping to defeat the 
Eastern athletes. If he really does 
this awful thing it will leave an un- 
fillable gap in the Olympic Club 
team. 

Parker is the brim ideal of the 
modern athlete. One of those, who, 
swept all before him at the Olym- 
pic games and whose stamina and 
symmetry provoked the eulogies of 
artists and men of letters of other 
lands. He is built for speed and 
yet is so sturdy that in the old 
days they would have made him 
into a weight lifter. If they can 
persuade him to run this year there 
is little doubt that a fresh record 
will be established for the quarter 
mile. Maxey Long of the New 
York Athletic Club in 1900, covered 
this distance in 47 seconds. This was 
achieved on a straight away cinder 
track. Running in Australia from 



THE WASP 

SPORTSMAN'S NOTEBOOK 



13 



By R. C. Baily 



scratch against fourteen other run- 
ners and on a Bat, curved track, 
Parker has done the distance in 
49 and one-fifths seconds. The Olym- 
pic club experts are convinced that 
Parker can chop down 47 seconds 
on the Exposition track competing 
against the greatest athletes in the 
world. 

■::■ -::- ::■ ■::- 

The accompanying photograph 
was taken at Fresno this summer 
when Parker staggered the sporting 

world by defeating Howard Drew in 
the 220 yards, at the same time 
equaling the world's record time of 
21 and one-fifth seconds. This was 
a wonderful bit of running and 
stamped the Olympic man for all 
time as one of the great sprinters. 
Fancy a man of this kind prefer- 
ring farming to the laurels and lime- 
light of athletic arenas. But so it 
is. Parker has a big ranch near 



I new of Southern California have 
all achieved the same ti No oth- 
er world's record is shared by so 

many. 

-::- ■::■ ■::■ .;■:- 

British Way Best 
A report recently issued at Stan- 
ford University showing the money 
spent on sport indicates that it is 
not the games that cost most which 
arc actively enjoyed by the larger 
number of students. For instance, 
rugby cost .$6,126.75, yet only half 
a bundled students played. Tennis 
cost only 75 cens the price of a 
couple of tennis balls, yet scores 
of men enjoyed this pastime. De- 
bate (Is this a sport?) lead to an 
expenditure of $139, which was pre- 
cisely the amount devoted to base- 
ball. Track athletics cost $1,22S, 
soccer, $287 and crew $233. Stanford 
is anxious to see as many men as 
possible actively engaged in sport 




with a big salary who takes defeat 
like grim death. 

* * * # 

Golfers will be sorry to hear of 
the serious illness of J. J. Melter- 
mott, who twice won the national 
open golf championship. He has 
been in a private sanitorium near 
Philadelphia for four weeks suffer- 
ing from what is described by his 
family as a complete nervous break- 
down. Following his disappear- 
ance from Atlantic city a few days 
before Christmas it was not until 




George Parker of the Olympic Club beating Howard Drew, the Colored Marvel. 



Stockton and he has recently mar- 
ried and neither universities anx- 
ious for his attendance nor ath- 
letic coaches desiring his assistance 
can persuade him to leave the cows 
and chickens. 

A rather interesting fact in con- 
nection with the 220 yard world's 
record is the fact that it is held by 
no less than six men. Bernie Wc- 
fer, Columbia University; Don Lip- 
pencott, University of Pennsyl- 
vania; Applegarth of England; 
Ralph Craig, Michigan and Howard 



and not so much the gladiatorial 
glorification of a few stars. That 
does seem to be one of the things 
that the English universities do 
better than ours. 

At Oxford and Cambridge every 
man from the aesthetic worshipper 
of art, long-haired and flowing of 
tie, to the bemonocled fashionable 
product of the swagger college does 
play some game bard. There are 
no professional coaches and there- 
fore while victory is hailed with en- 
thusiasm, defeat leaves very little 
bitterness. It is the paid coach 



t ^ t A i | i * | > » J « » I «» I « * l * i ff ' X * 

Select Assort- 
ment of fine 
candies and 
patisserie. 



Telephones 

Douglas 3266 
Douglas 3267 




French Confectioner/ 



Ice cream to 
order. Wedding 
cakes and 
cream cakes a 
specialty. 

********** 




211 Powell Street 
San Francisco, California 



recently that McDermott's friends 
learned the young man had been 
placed in a sanitorium by his fam- 
ily. From the time when McDer- 
mott won the open golf champion- 
ship in Philadelphia, August 13, 
1910, which was his twentieth birth- 
day, lie continued to rise in golf 
circles until the summer of 1913, 
when his stroke fell off and he be- 
gan to fall back into the ranks of 
the ordinary golf players. It is 
claimed by some that golf is next 
to chess, the most exacting trial of 
nerves known to the world of pas- 
time. Those who hold this view de- 
clare that it is the still ball that 
renders golf such stern toil. In ten- 
nis, baseball, football, there is the 
constant inspiration of the moving 
sphere and the spirit of fight 
roused by the enemy. But in golf 
the enemy has his own ball to play 
and success depends on the abso- 
lutely accurate performance of a 
multitudinous number of different 
movements. Ground and wind have 
(Continued on Page 17) 



14 



THE WASP 



Saturday, February 13, 1915 



Mexican Oil Row 

Another controversy has develop- 
ed between the Caranza authorities 
and oil companies in the Tarnpico 
district. It is reported that Carran- 
za is proposing that the companies 
sign an agreement to conform to all 
provisions of new petroleum laws in 
advance of their promulgations as 
the price of being permitted to re- 
sume drilling and construction op- 
erations. 

The new laws are being drafted 
by Carranza's Ministers. The com- 
panies have refused to sign the pro- 
posed agreement and work on new 
projects is still halted. 

There is reason to believe the new 
laws will be very drastic. It is un- 
derstood the companies are afraid 
to combat themselves too far in re- 
gard to proposals from Carranza, 
as his authority in Mexico is recog- 
nized only in a limited area and he 
is proceeding to govern without the 
aid of a Congress or any other body 
based on the Constitution. Also 
there are doubts as to how long 
Carranza will be able to retain even 
his present position. 



Too Much Tampering 

So much tampering with the Steel 
minimum begins to provoke criti- 
cism as an excessively arbitrary in- 
terference with the market and 
can hardly fail to make for further 
settlement of the list in general. On 
all accounts it would seem to be bet- 
ter now to make a large cut in the 
minimum price of the Steel shares 
or, what is better yet, to take off 
the embargo of minimum prices 
from the whole list. All the indi- 
cations are that the market is im- 
mune from the disturbances which 
were apprehended when the pro- 
tective prices were established. 

It would be just as easy and just 
as sensible to close the Stock Ex- 
change arbitrarily again in the 
event of a threatening overwhelm- 
ing of quoted values by liquida- 
tion as it would be to allow sus- 
pension of the market to be auto- 
matically effected by a rush of sales 
against the obstacle of the mini- 
mum prices. The market clearly 
wants to respond to the vastly en- 
couraging factors in the financial 




SoriE P>KE BORN TO GREATNESS: 50N1E --ETC. 

THE MONEY MAKERS 

(By X-WALL) 



and business situation and this is 
almost assurance enough that pro- 
tective prices are no longer needed. 
Nevertheless the experience which 
Wall Street is having in the exas- 
perating embarrassments of artific- 
ial restrictions on trading is creat- 
ing an unexpected set of real diffi- 
culties for-the financial community. 



War Helps Hawaii 

The European war has saved the 
sugar planters of Hawaii, according 
to ex-Gov. George B. Carter of that 
Territory to a representative of 
the Wasp. And if the report proves 
true that the Administration in- 
tends postponing the operation of 
the free sugar provision of the tar- 
iff for five years, Mr. Carter says 
that will be the most sensible thing 
the Democrats have ever done. 

"In Hawaii," said Mr. Carter yes- 
terday, "our attitude has been one 
of endurance. We are waiting to 
see not only the results of the war, 
but what the Administration is 
going to do next. Of course, the 
high price of sugar is due absolute- 
ly to the war. In fact, the Euro- 
pean war has made the last twelve 
months the most phenomenal year 
in the history of sugar-growing. In 
April we got the lowest price for 
sugar in twenty years, and there 
was the worst depression in the in- 
dustry, due entirely to the fact that 
Congress had adopted free sugar 
legislation, and practically scrap- 



THE ANGLO & LONDON PARIS 
NATIONAL BANK 



SAN FRANCISCO 



Capital $ 4,000,000 

Surplus and Proats. 1,600,000 
Total Resources. . . . 40,000,000 



■ rf» 



OFFICERS: 

\ Herbert Fleischhacker President 

\ Sig. Greenebamn . .Chairman of Board 
t Washington Dodge. . . Vice-President 

, J. Friedlander Vice-President 

] C. F. Hunt Vice-President 

E. Altschul Cashier 

J C. E. Parker Assistant Cashier 

Win. H. High Assistant Cashier 

H. Choynski Assistant Cashier 

G. E. Eurdick Assistant Cashier 

G. F. Herr. .. .Assistant. Cashier 
A. L. Langerman Secretary 



ped every sugar plantation in the 
United States and its Territories. 
In September sugar reached the 
highest price it has ever attained 
in the forty years I have known 
anything about sugar prices. This 
irregularity is a little trying. 
* * * # * 

Prince or Pauper 

The Bache review, commenting on 
the Steel incident says: "Steet com- 
mon is held as an investment not 
by any experts, but by thousands 
of little people who know nothing 
about investment, but have gradu- 
ated from the old days when they 
were fooled with fake oil stocks and 
cheap mining stocks, invariably 
worthless, and lost all the money 
they put in them. These people 
earnestly resolved after their losses 
to take thereafter something 'solid' 
and very many of them have since 
been virtuously buying Steel com- 
mon to the extent of a small num- 
ber of shares. They certainly have 
got something better than oil and 
mining bubbles, but the output of 
the dividend altogether will be a 
bad shock for some of them. So 
Steel common, true heir of the old 
fashioned iron and steel business, 
masquerades either as Prince or 
Pauper, and must now for a per- 
iod drag its rags about it and sleep 
in the gutter. Its time will come 
again, however, to put on the prin- 
cely robes: not in three months 
probably, as it would take a mar- 
velous increase in earnings to make 
a dividend for it in the next quar- 
ter, but the Steel Corporation man- 
agers seem unshaken in their be- 
lief of a good outlook. There is 
little doubt that the steel business 
has been through its worst exper- 
ience and that improvement will 
grow from now on.' 

***** 

More Gold for Turkey 
Advices received here from Sofia 
state that $5,000,000 in German gold 
has just passed through Bulgaria 
on a single train en route for Con- 
stantinople. 

According to Sofia the shipment 
makes a total of $15,000,000 in gold, 
which has been shipped to Turkey 
from Germany. 



High 

Grade 

Municipals 

Free from tne expense and annoy- 
ance of the Federal 

Income Tax 

Byrne &a